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Arnold
04-06-2011, 11:31 AM
How to Find a Good Physician for Testosterone Replacement Therapy
by Nelson Vergel

Many primary care doctors in the United States feel comfortable prescribing testosterone in 2010. Unfortunately, there are many doctors who still do not know much about the proper management of testosterone replacement or are afraid to prescribe it.

Here are several resources that can help you if you need to search for one:

The Hormone Foundation: The Hormone Foundation, the public education affiliate of The Endocrine Society, is a leading source of hormone-related health information for the public, physicians, allied health professionals and the media. Their mission is to serve as a resource for the public by promoting the prevention, treatment and cure of hormone-related conditions through outreach and education.

The Hormone Foundation’s physician referral directory is comprised of over 3,000 members of The Endocrine Society, the largest and most influential organization of endocrinologists in the world. The referral is updated weekly with physicians who are accepting new patients. To find a specialist near you, please use the search tools below. You can search by ZIP code, state/province, or area of specialty (e.g., diabetes, thyroid, etc.) within the United States and abroad.

Find An Endocrinologist (http://www.hormone.org/FindAnEndo/index.cfm)

Life Extension Foundation, List of Innovative Doctors:
http:Directory of Innovative Anti-Aging Doctors, Health And Wellness Practitioners - Life Extension (http://www.lef.org/Health-Wellness/InnovativeDoctors/)

There is an AACE doctor search page at:
American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (http://www.aace.com/resources/memsearch.php)

In theory they would use the AACE hypogonadism guidelines, but do not assume that all endocrinologists are testosterone friendly.

Women’s International Pharmacy: They refer doctors here Request A Free Practitioner Referral (http://www.womensinternational.com/request_referral.html)

College Pharmacy (Colorado Springs, CO): College Pharmacy - Home (http://www.collegepharmacy.com/)

Click “Find a Health Care Provider.” There is a form to fill out. Submit the form and they will e-mail a list of doctors nearest you who use their compounding services.

Medibolics.com, a HIV-related web site:

Doctors in this list also treat people who are not HIV positive: PoWeR Doctors Referral List (http://www.medibolics.com/physic2.htm)

Directory of “anti-aging” worldwide doctors: Worldhealth.net: Global Resource for Anti-Aging, Functional and Regenerative Medicine: Search for a Doctor | Worldhealth.net Anti-Aging News (http://www.worldhealth.net/pages/directory/?)

You can also google “compounding pharmacy YOUR CITY” to find out which compounding pharmacies are in your area. You can call them to find out if they can refer you to a doctor who uses their services.

After you find a potential doctor, ask some basic questions to determine their level of knowledge about testosterone. Some may feel insulted to be asked questions like these, but if they are it’s probably not going to be a good match for you (of course, be nice and diplomatic when asking questions!)

1. How many men does he/she treat for hypogonadism?
2. Does he/she offer HCG therapy, in addition to testosterone for testicular atrophy? (Many doctors do not know how to use HCG.)
3. Does he/she use Arimidex or tamoxifen to keep estrogen down in case of gynecomastia (enlarged breasts)?
4. Does he/she check for primary or secondary hypogonadism?
5. Does he/she allow patients to self-inject at home?
6. Does he/she work with any compounding pharmacies to access cheaper and customized hormonal products? (Some doctors worry com*pounding pharmacies have poor quality control)
7. What does he/she think of AACE hypogonadism guidelines? (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Medical Guidelines for Clini*cal Practice for the Evaluation and Treatment of Hypogonadism). These guidelines are very clear and doctors who have not read them should not be prescribing testosterone and managing sexual dysfunction. You can read them at link 12 and 13 of www.aace.com/pub/guidelines/hypogonadism.pdf They are great guidelines, although they really do not address the use of HCG, Arimidex (anastrazole), tamoxifen, clomid, or any other medication that may help with side effect management.

I hope this helps you empower yourself to find the right doctor!

source (http://www.mesomorphosis.com/blog/testosterone-replacement-therapy-physicians/2760/)

ApexContestPrep
04-14-2011, 01:32 AM
Good read here, the anti-aging clinics seem to be the way to go for most HRT out here.

Arnold
04-14-2011, 09:26 AM
or a good Urologist, many think they should see a Endocrinologist for TRT, but don't waste you time, just go to a Urologist.

cdan19
04-17-2011, 06:02 AM
Interesting, I haven't thought about this avenue. I'm subject to yearly and random drug testing. I would however think that with a prescription from doctor for hormone replacement treatments I might get around it. Would this be the right forum to run out my spec's and ask for guidance as to if it would be premature to head in this direction or seek the pro-hormonr route? I'm an FNG so bare with me.

hoyle21
04-17-2011, 06:06 AM
Interesting, I haven't thought about this avenue. I'm subject to yearly and random drug testing. I would however think that with a prescription from doctor for hormone replacement treatments I might get around it. Would this be the right forum to run out my spec's and ask for guidance as to if it would be premature to head in this direction or seek the pro-hormonr route? I'm an FNG so bare with me.


What is the yearly drug test for? Unless it is sports related, I very highly doubt anyone is testing for PED's. Most work related drug tests just look for recreational drugs.

cdan19
04-17-2011, 06:56 AM
There are no parameters to the drug test. It's blood and urine and unuder are current contract they can test for any suspected drug use although this is considered to be a wellness check they are very fickle. I am no body builder but the general attitude is because I've played football at college level and at 45yoa am pretty active and in better than average shape the steroid comment is thrown around alot. Clearly they haven't a clue as to the body type that I would have if I were able to cycle. They're ignorant. I'm also the first to admit in conversation that with pro sports steroid use should be allowed and properly regulated. I've never made any bones about it that if it was legal I absolutely do a cycle or two a year. I'm 5 years away from retirement and on to another profession so I won't risk it. So pro-hormones is what I'm researching.

ROID
04-17-2011, 09:39 AM
move to florida

cdan19
04-17-2011, 10:18 AM
Be Florida next week. Ft Meyers for 10 days. I have alot of landscape to catch up on and powerwashing. I'll be there full time in 5 years tops and looking forward to it.