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LightBearer
11-14-2011, 06:07 PM
How Clomid Works in Men

With the suspension of Cincinnati Reds pitcher Edinson Volquez for performance enhancing drug use and a swirl of rumors that the agent involved was clomiphene (also known as Clomid,) I thought it timely to write about how clomiphene works and how it’s used. From what I read on the internets, there is an enormous amount of misinformation floating around out there.

To understand how clomiphene works, you need to know how the pituitary controls the making of testosterone in the testis. Testosterone is made by Leydig cells in the testis, which I explained in my last post. The pituitary releases a hormone called luteinizing hormone (“LH”) that stimulates the Leydig cells to make testosterone. Testosterone is converted to the female hormone estrogen, (which I also explained in my last post,) and estrogen tells the pituitary to stop making more LH. This kind of negative feedback system is common when it comes to how hormones work. It’s just like a thermostat and heater. As the room gets warmer, the thermostat sends less electricity to the heater. When the room gets colder, the thermostat sends more electricity to the heater.

http://www.ironmagazineforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=36820&stc=1&d=1321326733

Clomiphene works by blocking estrogen at the pituitary. The pituitary sees less estrogen, and makes more LH. More LH means that the Leydig cells in the testis make more testosterone.

As I explained in my last post, giving testosterone to a man does just the opposite. The pituitary thinks that the testis is making plenty of testosterone, and LH falls. As a result, the testis stops making testosterone, and the usually high levels of testosterone in the testis fall to the lower level in the blood.

So clomiphene is a way to increase testosterone in the blood and the testis at the same time. It preserves testis size and function while increasing blood testosterone.

Unfortunately, clomiphene is not FDA approved for use in the male. Like most of the medications that we use to treat male fertility, the pharmaceutical company that originally sought approval by the FDA did it for women. Clomiphene is now generic, and it’s unlikely that anyone will pony up the hundreds of millions of dollars necessary to get it approved for the male. That’s the bad news. The good news is that it means that this medication is fairly inexpensive, cheaper than most forms of prescription testosterone. Can a doctor prescribe clomiphene for a man? Yes. It’s “off label”, meaning that it’s not FDA approved for use in men.

As a medication, clomiphene is usually well tolerated by men. In my experience, most patients don’t feel anything as their testosterone rises. Those that do feel an increase in energy, sex drive, and muscle mass, especially if they work out. Very rarely I’ve had patients report that they feel too aggressive, or too angry. Very very rarely (twice in the last 20 years) I’ve had patients report visual changes. That’s worrisome, as the pituitary is near the optic nerve in the brain, and visual changes suggests that the pituitary may be changing in size. Because the skull is a closed space, it’s alarming if anything in the brain changes in size. In the last twenty years, I’ve also had two patients who had breast enlargement (called “gynecomastia”) while using clomiphene. Needless to say, for any of these problematic side effects, the clomiphene is discontinued.

So that’s the story with clomiphene. It can be used in the male, either for fertility or low testosterone levels. It’s an off label prescription drug. It works, and is usually well tolerated by men who take it.
http://www.maledoc.com/blog/2010/04/28/how-clomid-works-in-men/

Tuco
11-17-2011, 10:39 PM
Great read. In the future, maybe clomid will be a more frequently used way to have a trt regimen.

mp340
11-18-2011, 07:40 AM
Almost sounds like that should be hand in hand with TRT?

TonyMack
11-18-2011, 11:45 AM
Great read. In the future, maybe clomid will be a more frequently used way to have a trt regimen.

I'm not sure why, but doctors have concerns about continuos long term usage. Conventional medicine currently recommending Testosterone IM as preferred treatment of low T.

SloppyJ
11-18-2011, 12:05 PM
Good post. Thanks!

TJTJ
11-18-2011, 05:26 PM
rep'd for solid info

MDR
11-18-2011, 09:05 PM
Very nice-repped

Runner22
11-18-2011, 10:59 PM
What's troublesome to me is that I fall into that very rare category of having visual changes. I typically follow a standard protocol for PCT and always get tracers and sensitivity to bright lights in the dark. In fact, the tracers I experience only happen when natural or indoor light is low (morning & night). During the day I have no tracers. I found the severity to be dose dependent, but even at 50mgs ED I still get them. Should I discontinue Clomid for PCT and use Nolva/IGF1?

Btw...the clomid always brings me back to normal test levels and at 38 yearsof age, I find that comforting knowing that I don't have to consider TRT at this point.

Thoughts?