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ExLe
02-05-2012, 03:08 PM
Testosterone Replacement Therapy

Testosterone is a hormone produced by the testicles and is responsible for the proper development of male sexual characteristics. Testosterone is also important for maintaining muscle bulk, adequate levels of red blood cells, bone density, sense of well-being, and sexual and reproductive function.
Inadequate testosterone production is not a common cause of erectile dysfunction (ED). When ED does occur with decreased testosterone production, testosterone replacement therapy may improve the ED.
What causes testosterone deficiency?

As a man ages, the amount of testosterone in his body gradually declines. This natural decline starts after age 30 and continues throughout life. The significance of this decline is controversial and poorly understood. Among other potential causes of testosterone deficiency are:

injury or infection to the testicles
chemotherapy or radiation treatment for cancer
genetic abnormalities such as Klinefelter’s Syndrome (extra x chromosome)
hemochromatosis (too much iron in the body)
dysfunction of the pituitary gland (a gland in the brain that produces many important hormones)
medications, including hormone analogues used to treat prostate cancer and steroids
chronic illness
cirrhosis of the liver
chronic renal (kidney) failure
AIDS
inflammatory disease such as sarcoidosis (a condition that causes inflammation of the lungs and other organs)
stress
alcoholism
congenital conditions, Kallman’s Syndrome (low hormones, inability to smell and other abnormalities)
What are the symptoms of testosterone deficiency?

Symptoms of testosterone deficiency include the following:

decreased sex drive
decreased sense of well-being
depressed mood
difficulties with concentration and memory
erectile dysfunction
What are the changes that occur in the body with testosterone deficiency?

Changes that occur with testosterone deficiency include:

a decrease in muscle mass, with an increase in body fat
variable effects on cholesterol metabolism
a decrease in hemoglobin and possibly mild anemia
fragile bones (osteoporosis)
a decrease in body hair
How do I find out if I have a testosterone deficiency?

The only accurate way to detect the condition is to have your doctor measure the amount of testosterone in your blood. It sometimes may take several measurements of testosterone to be sure if a patient has a deficiency, since levels of testosterone tend to fluctuate throughout the day. The highest levels of testosterone are generally in the morning. This is why doctors prefer, if possible, to obtain early morning levels of testosterone.
What options are available for testosterone replacement?

The options available for testosterone replacement are:

intramuscular injections, generally every two or three weeks
testosterone patches worn either on the body or on the scrotum (the sac that contains the testicles). These patches are used daily. The body patch application is rotated between the buttocks, arms, back or abdomen.
testosterone gels that are applied daily to the shoulders, upper arms, or abdomen.
Each of these options provides adequate levels of hormone replacement. Each has side effects and advantages and disadvantages. Intramuscular injections produce wider swings in hormone concentration, with higher levels shortly after the injection and lower levels just before the next injection is due. They may also produce increases in blood cell count that are higher than normal.
The body patches may produce skin irritation in a significant number of men, requiring discontinuation of the patch. The gels require care in making sure that the hormone is not accidentally transferred to another person or partner.
There are currently no pills available in the United States that provide adequate levels of hormone replacement. In addition, oral medications may produce liver abnormalities and are to be avoided.
The choice of hormone replacement therapy is best made with a thorough discussion between a patient and his physician.
Who shouldn’t take testosterone replacement therapy?

Testosterone replacement therapy may stimulate growth of the prostate. If early prostate cancer is present, testosterone may stimulate the cancer’s growth. Therefore, men who have prostate cancer should not take testosterone replacement therapy. It is important for all men considering testosterone replacement therapy to undergo prostate screening before starting this therapy.
Although it is a rare condition, men who have breast cancer should not take testosterone replacement therapy.
What are the side effects of testosterone replacement therapy?

In general, hormone replacement therapy is safe. It is associated with some side effects, including:

acne or oily skin
mild fluid retention
stimulation of prostate tissue, with perhaps some increased urination symptoms such as decreased stream or frequency
breast enlargement
worsening of sleep apnea (a sleep disorder that results in frequent night time awakenings and daytime sleepiness)
decreased testicular size
Many of these side effects are not common.
Laboratory abnormalities that can occur with hormone replacement include:

changes in cholesterol concentrations
increase in red cell count
decrease in sperm count, producing infertility (especially in younger men)
If you are taking hormone replacement therapy, regular follow-up appointments with your physician are important.





Please use this thread to discuss any TRT reltated questions...

coolrise
02-05-2012, 03:21 PM
http://www.ironmagazineforums.com/images/misc/sticky.gif Sticky: HRT Info (http://www.ironmagazineforums.com/anabolic-zone/67662-hrt-info.html)
ZECH (07-17-2006)

independent
02-05-2012, 05:47 PM
Great thread.

Ichigo
02-05-2012, 10:15 PM
Good thread.:winkfinger:

gamma
02-06-2012, 05:17 AM
Cirrhosis of the liver causing testosterone deficiency? I am wondering is it considered safe to be on TRT with cirrhosis or even fatty liver for that matter?

independent
02-06-2012, 07:49 AM
Cirrhosis of the liver causing testosterone deficiency? I am wondering is it considered safe to be on TRT with cirrhosis or even fatty liver for that matter?

As long as the trt isnt affecting liver values which it shouldnt it would be fine. You wouldnt want to use oral steroids but that wouldnt be recommended for trt anyways.

vannesb
02-06-2012, 08:19 AM
Cirrhosis of the liver causing testosterone deficiency? I am wondering is it considered safe to be on TRT with cirrhosis or even fatty liver for that matter?

Actually it is the opsite, with TRT it has reduced red blood cell counts and lowered enzyme levels in the liver.

charley
02-06-2012, 09:57 AM
Great thread..........

bulldogz
02-06-2012, 10:45 AM
Nice thread...!

Tonkatough
02-06-2012, 12:21 PM
Good thread!!

gamma
02-13-2012, 09:06 PM
Actually it is the opsite, with TRT it has reduced red blood cell counts and lowered enzyme levels in the liver.

Sounds good but is there any science behide this? Every thing I looked up on line says the opposite . Do u know of any studys that we can read ?

gamma
02-20-2012, 05:28 AM
?

bulldogz
02-20-2012, 04:34 PM
I have noticed a decrease on my liver values while on TRT as far as RBC this did increase slightly...

I have no studies on this just my bloodwork...

gamma
02-21-2012, 04:13 AM
The only reason I ask is because I ran a couple PH's last year,and whiling to doing blood work found out I had some underlying liver issues.That was in dec my values have came down a lot since then,as of two weeks ago numbers are still pretty high 150-200's(liver).I also have very low test numbers and was looking into Trt before all this and was wondering if this is still an option.So jus reaching out to those on trt to see what you guys think or know.
On a side note I am in no hurry, I started researching all this in 08 and have yet to pull the trigger on anything other than a few Ph's. Up in till the last blood test I was doing bloods and stuff my self but I got kinda scarred when values came so high so I did see my doctor.(no help there)

charley
02-21-2012, 10:25 AM
What options are available for testosterone replacement?

The options available for testosterone replacement are:

[[[[[intramuscular us injections, generally every two or three weeks]]]]]

Every 2 to 3 weeks is not often enough as most of know,every week if not twice a week......

jasoncohenrn
03-01-2012, 10:33 PM
whats everyones thoughts on pergonal used to keep you natural testes working pergonal is LH and FSH this way you have some natural test and spermogenosis

JOckMuscleTank
04-17-2012, 06:21 AM
Nelson Vergel's blog is very good and contains details on TRT management and options: Testosterone: A Man's Guide (http://testosteronewisdom.blogspot.com/)

Rafael

PumpedUpBro
05-18-2012, 07:06 AM
Love this thread. Glad I found it.