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hoyle21
03-09-2012, 02:05 PM
Anyone have any experience or information on this procedure? Apparently they can inject testosterone pellets in you, and the procedure is good for 4-6 months at a time.


My Doctors office got me pre approved with my insurance provider. Just started taking 200mgs/week test c.

TonyMack
03-09-2012, 02:20 PM
I'd stick with the injections. 200 mgs a week is a good TRT dose.

independent
03-09-2012, 04:59 PM
I'd stick with the injections. 200 mgs a week is a good TRT dose.

This^^^

You what complete control of your dosage.

groomer
03-09-2012, 08:09 PM
currently have testopel's.....had 14 put in a little over a month ago. if you have questions, ask away. i will try to help out as much as possible

charley
03-10-2012, 06:47 PM
When an adult male patient is diagnosed with testosterone deficiency syndrome based on clinical symptoms and serum testosterone values, various testosterone delivery systems may be considered.
Most practitioners are unaware that testosterone replacement therapy via long-acting subcutaneous testosterone pellets has been utilized clinically in men for more than 65 years.
There are several strict sterile technical considerations concerning placement of the long-acting Testopel® subcutaneous testosterone pellets for testosterone deficiency syndrome using a modification of Handlesman’s technique. The purpose of the strict sterile technical considerations is to minimize implantation site infections and to minimize spontaneous pellet extrusions.
Previous experience with testosterone pellets manufactured by Organon has reported a relatively high rate of pellet extrusion (8.5-12%), and infection (1.4 to 6.8%).
Strict sterile technique and a unique manufacturing process for Testopel® pellets which results in a small, smooth-surfaced pellet, and the absence of foreign material within the Testopel® sterile ampule likely accounts for the significant safety data advantages.
Strict Sterile Technique

The testosterone pellet implantation procedure is performed under sterile conditions, using facemasks, in an office setting. All maneuvers utilized are designed to diminish the chances of pellet infection/extrusion.
The patient is placed in the lateral fetal position for implantation in the upper outer posterior gluteal region.
The iliac crest (IC) is identified. The sacroiliac joint (SI) is identified. A point half way between and four cms distally is noted.
(http://sexualmed.org/index.cfm/sexual-health-treatments/for-men/male-testosterone/testosterone-pellet-photo-gallery/)
A 10 cm line, the projected #16 gauge trocar tract, is marked distally and parallel to the femur. The testosterone pellet is placed deep (approximately 1/2 inch below the skin surface) at the end of the 10 cm line and is well away for the trocar insertion site; this will diminish the chances of pellet infection/extrusion.
The first set of sterile gloves are utilized. A physician sterile field is established using a sterile drape. The sterile patient drape is opened. Sterile gauze is used.
The implant area is washed with sterile gauze and Hibiclens for 5 minutes. This will lower the skin bacterial count and diminish the chances of pellet infection/extrusion.
The implant area is rinsed with sterile gauze and 99% alcohol. This will lower the skin bacterial count and diminish the chances of pellet infection/extrusion.
The implant area is prepped with sterile gauze and povidone-iodine and the patient is draped in standard fashion. This will lower the skin bacterial count and diminish the chances of pellet infection/extrusion.
Local anesthesia consists of 15 ml lidocaine 2% with 1:100,000 epinephrine.
Local anesthesia is administered using a 1.5 inch 27 gauge needle first via a skin wheal (5 ml) at the site of the intended skin incision.
Local anesthesia is administered then to a depth of 1 to 2 cm below the skin surface over the 10 cm length of the projected #16 trocar tract (10 ml).
While the local anesthesia is developing, the sterile trocar is opened. The sterile glass ampule of testosterone pellet (3 mm by 8 mm) is opened and and the testosterone pellet is placed in a sterile container in the physician sterile field .
One gloved hand, the one used to introduce the pellet into the #16 gauge trocar lumen, does not ever touch the patient’s skin (STAR hand in. This will lower the potential contamination of the pellet with skin bacteria and diminish the chances of pellet infection/extrusion. After adequate anesthesia, an #11 blade scalpel is used to make a 4 mm stab incision into the subcutaneous region of skin. This incision needs to be greater than the 3 mm lumen of the pellet and the #16 gauge trocar.. The #16 gauge trocar with sharp stylet is then introduced at a 30-degree angle to the skin surface and advanced approximately 1 to 2 cm deep into the subcutaneous tissue. The 10 cm #16 gauge trocar with sharp stylet in place is advanced in the trajectory of the femur for the length of the trocar. Note the sterile gloved hand that will handle the pellet does not touch the patient’s skin
The #16 gauge trocar is withdrawn 2 cm to the region of the pellet cutout. The sharp stylet is withdrawn. A sterile gauze backdrop is placed under the trocar.
Each individual testosterone pellet is separately loaded into the trocar lumen using the sterile gloved hand that never touched the patient’s skin.
The pellets in the trocar lumen are advanced with the blunt stylet. Often, no more than 5 pellets are placed per tract. If more than 5 pellets are required, two or three total tracts are fashioned, using the same skin incision, but angling the trocar and sharp stylet to advance in a plane 30 degrees from the previous tract.
After all the desired subcutaneous testosterone pellets have been placed, the 10 cm #16 gauge trocar with blunt stylet is withdrawn. Sterile benzoin is placed around the tab incision. The incision is closed with sterile adhesive strips (steri-strips), and covered by a sterile large bandage. To minimize bruising, the patient is placed in the opposite lateral fetal position on an ice pack for approximately 15 minutes.
Testosterone pellets are well tolerated and easily implanted using strict sterile technique to minimize side effects. Post-pellet instructions are to avoid hot tubs or swimming pools for 7 days after insertion to avoid wound infection. The bandage and steri-strips stay in place for 7 days.
Testosterone implants are convenient as they provide sustained levels of testosterone for 4 – 6 months. Patients who travel and would otherwise forget to apply daily gels are 100% compliant with pellet therapy. Additional benefits of the pellet are that they cannot transfer testosterone medication to a partner or child. If the physiologic effect is waning over time, supplementation with topical testosterone or intramuscular injection can be used until the next pellet insertion.





(http://sexualmed.org/sexmed/index.cfm/forums/)

charley
03-10-2012, 06:51 PM
Side Effects



Cardiovascular

Cardiovascular side effects have included hypertension, and edema with and without congestive heart failure.
Endocrine

Endocrine side effects have included gynecomastia as a frequent and sometimes persistent side effect. Cautious use is recommended in patients with existing gynecomastia.

During exogenous administration of androgens, endogenous testosterone release is inhibited through feedback inhibition of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH). Large doses of exogenous androgens may suppress spermatogenesis through inhibition of pituitary follicle stimulating hormone (FSH).

Androgens may decrease levels of thyroxin binding globulin resulting in decreased total T4 serum levels and increased resin uptake of T3 and T4. Free thyroid hormone levels remain unchanged and there is no clinical evidence of thyroid dysfunction.

Changes in insulin sensitivity or glycemic control may occur in patients treated with androgens. In diabetic patients, the metabolic effects of androgens may decrease blood glucose and, therefore, insulin requirements.

Virilization of children has been reported due to secondary exposure to testosterone. Signs and symptoms have included inappropriate enlargement of the penis or clitoris, premature development of pubic hair, increased erections and libido, aggressive behavior, and advanced bone age. In most cases, these signs and symptoms regressed with removal of the exposure to testosterone. In a few cases, however, enlarged genitalia did not fully return to age-appropriate normal size and bone age remained modestly greater than chronological age.
Renal

Renal side effects have included retention of nitrogen, sodium, potassium, chloride, water and phosphorus, and decreased urinary excretion of calcium.
Hepatic

Hepatic side effects have included life-threatening peliosis hepatitis and hepatic abnormalities including hepatic neoplasms and hepatocellular carcinomas following prolonged therapy with high doses of androgen. Tumor regression did not occur in all cases following medication withdrawal.

Cholestatic hepatitis, jaundice, and abnormal liver function tests have occurred during androgen therapy. Drug-induced jaundice is usually reversible following drug discontinuation.
Genitourinary

Genitourinary side effects following chronic administration and/or large dosages of testosterone have included oligospermia and decreased ejaculatory volume. Elderly male patients have experienced prostatic enlargement resulting in urinary obstruction. Priapism and excessive stimulation has developed. Other urinary side effects have included nocturia, urinary hesitancy, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, urinary urgency, and weak urinary system.

In female patients the use of androgens has resulted in virilization including deepening voice, hirsutism, acne, clitomegaly (not reversible), and menstrual abnormalities. Discontinuation of testosterone at signs of mild virilization may prevent irreversible virilization.
Metabolic

Metabolic side effects have included osteolytic-induced hypercalcemia in immobilized patients or those with metastatic breast disease. Increased cholesterol levels and acute intermittent porphyria have been reported.
Other

Other side effects have included virilization in female patients. Virilization included deepening voice, hirsutism, acne, clitomegaly (not reversible), and menstrual abnormalities.

Female sexual partners of men using topical testosterone (residual on skin) have reported virilization.
Dermatologic

Dermatologic side effects have included hirsutism, acne, male-patterned baldness and seborrhea. Dermal reactions have been the most commonly reported side effects for transdermal testosterone and occur primarily at the site of application. Dermal effects have included 3 types: irritation including mild to moderate erythema (to 6%), induration (3%), itching (12%), and burning (3%); allergic contact dermatitis including pruritus (to 37%), vesicles (6%), and rash (2%); and burn-like blisters (12%).
Discontinuation rates for transdermal testosterone were as follows: due to chronic skin irritation (5%), allergic dermal reactions (4%), and burn-like, usually a single site (0%).

Triamcinolone 1% cream applied sparingly to skin under the reservoir reduced irritation and did not interfere with testosterone absorption. Ointment formulations reduce testosterone absorption.
Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal side effects have included nausea and vomiting.
Musculoskeletal

Testosterone is involved in termination of linear bone growth by closure of the epiphyseal growth centers. Appropriate monitoring of bone age is recommended during testosterone use in healthy males with delayed puberty.
Musculoskeletal side effects have included myalgia and pain.
Hematologic

Hematologic side effects have included alteration in clotting factors II, V, VII and X and polycythemia due to increased red cell production. Anemia has also been reported.
Hypersensitivity

Hypersensitivity side effects have included rash and anaphylactoid reactions.
Local

Local side effects have included inflammation and pain at injection or dermal application site.
Nervous system

Nervous system side effects have included altered libido (increased/decreased), headache (to 5%), anxiety, depression, generalized paresthesia, or sleep apnea syndrome.
Oncologic

Oncologic side effects have included carcinoma of the prostate, hepatic neoplasms, and hepatocellular carcinomas.
Respiratory

Respiratory side effects have included reports of potentiation of sleep apnea, particularly in obese (http://www.drugs.com/sfx/testopel-pellets-side-effects.html#) patients or those with chronic lung disease. There have been rare postmarketing reports of transient reactions involving urge to cough, coughing fits, and respiratory distress immediately after the injection of testosterone enanthate, an oil-based depot preparation.

groomer
03-10-2012, 07:38 PM
:coffee: Yeah......what he said :thumbs:

ohiodish
03-14-2012, 02:16 PM
currently have testopel's.....had 14 put in a little over a month ago. if you have questions, ask away. i will try to help out as much as possible
I'm on 1mL week of T and my friend from Nevada said the pellets are amazing. I have no experience, but he is consistently over 1100 when he checks every 6 weeks. Talks about pellets like they are the best thing ever...

I personally do not like the T injections (only used for 3 weeks) and the first 4 days after a T injection I feel great, but it seems to lose effect days 5-7. Considering pellets the next time I get T prescription. Have you had both and what is your opinion?

charley
03-14-2012, 04:19 PM
I personally do not like the T injections (only used for 3 weeks) and the first 4 days after a T injection I feel great, but it seems to lose effect days 5-7. Considering pellets the next time I get T prescription. Have you had both and what is your opinion?

,,try injecting 2x's a week.....it will help to maintain more stable levels of test...

ohiodish
03-15-2012, 07:55 AM
,,try injecting 2x's a week.....it will help to maintain more stable levels of test...

Cut the dose in half or ask Doc to increase script?

TonyMack
03-15-2012, 09:33 AM
Cut the dose in half or ask Doc to increase script?

You could do either, depends on what you want. I'd go for higher doses and more frequent injections. But at a very minimum, more frequent injections at the same weekly dose would give you more stable bloods.

vannesb
03-15-2012, 04:53 PM
My doctor increased my dose to 300 mg per week and take 2 injections per week for stable blood! feel great!!

mth496
03-15-2012, 05:19 PM
I like to inject myself. I feel safer and better then letting a doc inject me. Dame i can only imagine have pellets put in, this is the first i heard of somthing like that. Interesting though.

justplayin
03-15-2012, 11:38 PM
This is very interesting. I have heard nothing but good things about the pellets. I recently got some depressing labs back and now I'm considering HRT. The pellets seems to be the easiest and cheapest route to go these days.

Like most people, I would like to get my T levels as high as possible without compromising my health. If a normal range is 500-1000, I want to be at 900!

If I were to go the HRT route how many pellets would be the equivalent of say 250 mg testosterone cypionate? Also, is arimidex/hcg still a must with the pellets?

charley
03-16-2012, 09:36 AM
Injections 2x's per week are better than pellets because you will have stable blood levels.

From what I've read pellet insertion are unstable.

exphys88
03-19-2012, 07:35 PM
Is nebido an option in the states or CA? Supposedly you only need an injection every 8-12 weeks.

justplayin
03-19-2012, 09:27 PM
Injections 2x's per week are better than pellets because you will have stable blood levels.

From what I've read pellet insertion are unstable.

Everything I've read says that the pellets are the most stable option on the market right now. They supposedly provide a slow and steady release of T for up to 3 months before any major fluctuations occur. Guys on other boards who have experience with both almost always swear by the pellets now.

groomer
03-20-2012, 01:26 PM
Testopel is the most stable form of injecting testosterone into the body

charley
03-20-2012, 03:11 PM
I ain't going to argue with you........I'm on other boards......only heard neg stuff....

I think you are reading 'the company newsletter'...

BigPerm
12-28-2013, 12:36 PM
I was on pellets for about a year and a half. 18 of them every 3 months. Test levels were in the high 900's. My last insertion they became infected after 1 month. Red swollen....and full of puss. I squeezed it and about 6 pellets came out. Went back to the doc who squeezed out 6 more. Put me on antibiotics and switched to shots. The site has been oozzy for about two months. He said he's never seen it do that.

Long story short I'm done with the pellets. They worked fine for a long time. Now I get .75cc twice a week to total 1.5cc of Test C.

Pellets cost me $1800 every 3 months due to my deductible. Injections are 1-10ml vial a month at $15! No brainer for me.