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Impengment/Bursitis

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    Impengment/Bursitis

    I was told by the docter a couple years ago that I had impingment and bursitis in my left shoulder and that it just need time to heal. I took about 6 months off, which the Doc said should be plenty, but it I still have it. I can't do most shoulder exercises and it hinders most of my chest pressing of any kind. I can't lay on that shoulder for more that 5 minutes without it hurting. I asked for a cortizone shot but the doctor said no go. They are afraid that I will keep lifting after the shot and blow out my shoulder.

    Has anyone ever dealt with this and if so do you know of anything that will help? Thanks

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    See another doctor. Impingement can be a symptom of more serious injury.

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    If it's still messed up after that much time there's something more serious going on. Perhaps badly torn rotator cuff muscles.

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    I guess you guys are probably right. I have been avoiding seein a doctor about it again because the last thing I want to hear is that I need surgery. I was hoping I could improve it through strategic exercise if you will. Thanks for the advice

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    shop around for an accurpuncturist . . trust me, this works . . but you need a good one, not any old hack
    TheCaptn' is not a registered proctologist. His post are for his amusement only. Please seek proper medical advice if symptoms persist.


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    I have impingement syndrome in my right shoulder from a break about fifteen years ago. I managed to blow off surgery by getting proper physiotherapy and A.R.T. done on it - but I had to give up pressing entirely for eight months while I rehabbed it.

    Find a really GOOD physiotherapist, one that actually does manual therapy and doesn't just slap machines on you, and look for a good chiro or physiotherapist who does Active Release.

    Meanwhile adjust your training. If you do a movement where you feel the impingement, STOP IMMEDIATELY. This will only flare it up. I had to change some of the work that I do - for instance, I no longer do millies but instead do clean and press, and olympic bar corner presses. If you're doing upright rows, stop. Likewise any wide grip stuff, particularly behind the neck pulldowns and presses. If you're doing bench dips, stop. And you may find incline pressing more comfortable than flat, or vice versa.

    You may need to become a back and leg specialist for a while. No worries, you always have something to build.

    Finally, if you're taking NSAIDs, stop - they'll interfere with the healing process and may even lead you to re-injure the area.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built View Post
    I have impingement syndrome in my right shoulder from a break about fifteen years ago. I managed to blow off surgery by getting proper physiotherapy and A.R.T. done on it - but I had to give up pressing entirely for eight months while I rehabbed it.

    Find a really GOOD physiotherapist, one that actually does manual therapy and doesn't just slap machines on you, and look for a good chiro or physiotherapist who does Active Release.

    Meanwhile adjust your training. If you do a movement where you feel the impingement, STOP IMMEDIATELY. This will only flare it up. I had to change some of the work that I do - for instance, I no longer do millies but instead do clean and press, and olympic bar corner presses. If you're doing upright rows, stop. Likewise any wide grip stuff, particularly behind the neck pulldowns and presses. If you're doing bench dips, stop. And you may find incline pressing more comfortable than flat, or vice versa.

    You may need to become a back and leg specialist for a while. No worries, you always have something to build.

    Finally, if you're taking NSAIDs, stop - they'll interfere with the healing process and may even lead you to re-injure the area.
    I stopped doing military press/upright rows/lateral side dumbell raises/and all behind the head exercises about a year ago because these were the exercises I was feeling it the most in. I can't even lay on my left side for more than 5 minutes without feeling like my shoulder is on fire. Thanks for the advice on who to go see. I will definitely look into A.R.T. and physiotherapy.

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    Glad I could help.

    I'll add this: expect this to take a LONG time to clear up - a year isn't uncommon - but take heart in knowing it WILL most likely become manageable, if perhaps a chronic condition that will flare up from time to time. This has been the case for me. From time to time, I'll feel it act up, IMMEDIATELY stop all pressing movements, get physio, and I'm back to pressing within the month.

    Meanwhile, train your back. Pulling movements typically do these shoulder things a world of good. In particular, investigate movements that promote scapular mobility.
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    Built, does yours ever hurt when lay on that shoulder? Since I have stopped all the exercises that cause the pain, I would have thought it would have gotten somewhat better but it still hurts like crazy after 5 minutes of laying on it. Also, I can feel it a little when I do flat and incline dumbbell presses but not so much that it causes me to not be able to do it. I just stick with lighter weight and more reps. It sucks because I am deployed right now and the don't have the same medical care here in these remote areas that they have back in the states so I will have to wait 9 more months before I can look into my treatment options. I am trying to do what I can to be able to still lift but manage/decrease the pain and symptoms. Thanks again.

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    Yes it does, within five minutes, and that never goes away.

    When you do your pressing movements, try this: flex your lat and retract your scapula BEFORE you press.

    Let me know if that makes it feel any better.

    Meanwhile, how's your squat? Deadlift?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built View Post
    Yes it does, within five minutes, and that never goes away.

    When you do your pressing movements, try this: flex your lat and retract your scapula BEFORE you press.

    Let me know if that makes it feel any better.

    Meanwhile, how's your squat? Deadlift?
    Funny you should ask...I was just on another thread learning about leg exercises I could do with an injured lower back. I tore a ligament at my L5 S1 a year ago doing MMA and it is still healing since I don't know how to be inactive. I have a bulging disc and have had 5 cortizone shots for it. It is slowly getting better but for now I am not doing dead lifts and only doing really light squats. I doing DB lunges and I am going to start doing step ups and a couple other leg exercises I got off of the other thread. My active lifestyle awards me injuries easily but I still try to do what I can. Military life is hard on joints and bones.

    What do you mean by retracting my scapula? and by before do you mean as a sort of stretch?

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    I mean pull your "wingbones" together before you press, as if you're trying to hold a pencil between your shoulder blades.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built View Post
    I mean pull your "wingbones" together before you press, as if you're trying to hold a pencil between your shoulder blades.
    Ahh, i can do that. I will try that.

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    I too got some impingment in my left shoulder. I found some stretches online and hopefully it will help. I can do almost any lift though. I suppose I am in a lot better shape than the TS, but I dont want it to get worse.

    Arm circles is the only time I feel it really badly.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Built View Post
    I have impingement syndrome in my right shoulder from a break about fifteen years ago. I managed to blow off surgery by getting proper physiotherapy and A.R.T. done on it - but I had to give up pressing entirely for eight months while I rehabbed it.

    Find a really GOOD physiotherapist, one that actually does manual therapy and doesn't just slap machines on you, and look for a good chiro or physiotherapist who does Active Release.

    Meanwhile adjust your training. If you do a movement where you feel the impingement, STOP IMMEDIATELY. This will only flare it up. I had to change some of the work that I do - for instance, I no longer do millies but instead do clean and press, and olympic bar corner presses. If you're doing upright rows, stop. Likewise any wide grip stuff, particularly behind the neck pulldowns and presses. If you're doing bench dips, stop. And you may find incline pressing more comfortable than flat, or vice versa.

    You may need to become a back and leg specialist for a while. No worries, you always have something to build.

    Finally, if you're taking NSAIDs, stop - they'll interfere with the healing process and may even lead you to re-injure the area.
    Built,

    What are the specific exercises you focused on to get rid of your impingement?

    I've been dealing with a shoulder injury for about a year now and pressing and internal rotation movements cause pain. I've finally found a manual therapist to open up pec minor and also loosen up the neck and back. It's provided some relief.

    Now, I want to train the scapular to stay retracted and depressed during pressing movements. Would be curious in what you did here. What I've been thinking:

    * Wall Slides
    * Prone Cobras
    * Straight arm lat pulldowns
    * Rows

    I've started doing these while also starting on wall pushups where every pushup I focus on keeping that scap retracted.

    Would be interested in your rehab and volume.

    THanks.

    KY

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