25% Off Black Friday Sale

Calculation of Protein Requirements

Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Registered User
    330vert's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    2
    Rep Points
    10

    Calculation of Protein Requirements

    Hi,
    This is a question I have discussed with a few people but never posted about.

    Do you Calculate your Protein/Carb requirements (ie. 1.5g to 1lb etc) with your Gross bodyweight or your lean mass. I believe most go by your Gross weight but to me it would make more sense to use your lean mass because you dont need to fuel fat.
    Im currently sitting at around 270lb but with 20% BF so would work on a rough lean mass of 216lbs so 324g Protein etc.
    Opinions welcome

  2. #2
    5/3/1
    BOARD REP
    Marat's Avatar


    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,121
    Rep Points
    38116404

    You're welcome to eat that much protein if you are comfortable with that intake. However, you can get by just fine with a significantly lower level of intake.

    The broad guideline of 1-1.5g/lb of lbm indicates that you can do fine at an intake as low as 1g/lb of lbm. That translates to a 'bottom floor' of about 215-220 grams of protein each day. Anything above that, more or less, is a matter of comfort.

  3. #3
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    555
    Rep Points
    14203344

    LBM includes bones, brain, blood, internal organs, skin, hair & fingernails and boogers.

    An even better protein intake guideline would set a constant basal intake for the above, and an additional amount of protein based solely on how much muscle you're carrying. For example, a 6 foot 180 pound guy probably has similar bone and organ weight to a 6 foot 220 pound guy, yet the 220 lb guy is probably carrying 2x to 3x the muscle mass.

    50 grams protein will cover your non-muscle needs more than adequately, and then add 2 to 2.5 grams of protein per pound of _muscle_. If your 216 lbs of LBM is 100 lbs of muscle, you're looking at 50+200=250 to 50+250=300 grams a day. More is a waste that'll just lighten your wallet and stress your kidneys.

    I have never understood why all the protein advice I read about is based on LBM instead of muscle mass.

  4. #4
    5/3/1
    BOARD REP
    Marat's Avatar


    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,121
    Rep Points
    38116404

    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    More is a ... stress your kidneys
    This is blatantly false. There's plenty of studies to support this and you'd be hard pressed to find a study of healthy kidneys that supports your statement.

    The impact of protein intake on renal function dec... [Ann Intern Med. 2003] - PubMed result
    High-protein diets are not hazardous for the healthy kidneys

    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    I have never understood why all the protein advice I read about is based on LBM instead of muscle mass.
    It provides an easy calculation to estimate protein intake. Also, I'm not sure that your estimations of muscle mass are accurate -- how did you come up with those figures? How would you know that an individual carries 2-3x more muscle mass compared to an individual who weighs 40 pounds less? Perhaps the heaver person carries 40 pounds more fat and they have the same LBM.


    Anyways, you came up with 250-300 and I came up with 225-325. Effectively the same thing but achieved through a simpler equation -- people have enough trouble grasping "LBM" as is.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    BOARD REP


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Workin on it!
    Posts
    772
    Rep Points
    15529569

    A person of your size could pretty much eat as much protein as you would like, however I would definitely limit the carbs quite a bit. at 6'2 220, I eat about 350-400g protein every day.

  6. #6
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    555
    Rep Points
    14203344

    Quote Originally Posted by Marat View Post
    This is blatantly false. There's plenty of studies to support this and you'd be hard pressed to find a study of healthy kidneys that supports your statement.

    The impact of protein intake on renal function dec... [Ann Intern Med. 2003] - PubMed result
    High-protein diets are not hazardous for the healthy kidneys
    Actually, your first link says: "However, high total protein intake, particularly high intake of nondairy animal protein, may accelerate renal function decline in women with mild renal insufficiency."
    And your second link says: "To conclude, it appears, at least in the short term, that protein intake under 2.8 g/kg does not impair renal function in well-trained athletes." That's about 1.25 grams per pound.

    And I didn't say damage, I said _stress_. I don't know about you, but I don't want to make my kidneys work at a level anywhere near 100% capacity for extended periods of time. Yes, if you're healthy it's no big deal, but if you have 'weak' kidneys (ok, renal insufficiency), you would never know it while on an average diet. I'd rather avoid the potential of renal stress altogether by not oversupplementing protein.


    Quote Originally Posted by Marat View Post
    It provides an easy calculation to estimate protein intake. Also, I'm not sure that your estimations of muscle mass are accurate -- how did you come up with those figures? How would you know that an individual carries 2-3x more muscle mass compared to an individual who weighs 40 pounds less? Perhaps the heaver person carries 40 pounds more fat and they have the same LBM.
    Assuming a 160 lb male in his 30's who has a 'typical' physique:
    Average skeletal mass (including marrow) is about 24 lbs (15%)
    Average muscle mass 64 lbs (40%) and 28 lbs fat (17%).
    Plus 10-12 lbs of blood, 3 lbs brain, 3-4 lbs lungs....etc.

    RDA for the above average male is 50 grams of protein, but that's just for maintenance. Once he starts bodybuilding his _muscles_ will need more protein, but the rest of him won't (or will need minimal extra amounts). If our 160 lb guy bulked up to 220, he doubled his muscle mass, and I know quite a few 180 lb guys who carried less than 40% muscle (I was one, egads)

    I know recommending protein based on fat-free mass is common, but what works for a guy carrying 120 lbs of muscle with lots of myofibrullar hypertrophy (thus a much higher percentage of actin/myosin) is severe overkill for a 160 lb beginner with half the muscle, or less. So a 160 lb guy just starting out would be fine at 1 gram per pound simply because he's not supporting much muscle. Yet elite lifters might need closer to 2 grams per pound of LBM simply because they're a higher percentage of muscle. Not adjusting the equation to account for non-muscle mass means beginners are getting too much or elite lifters aren't getting enough.

    I dunno, but I think 50+(LBM-100)*2 gets you a more realistic number that would apply to a much broader range of individuals, without being too difficult math-wise.

  7. #7
    Bioidentical Bodybuilder
    ELITE MEMBER
    Built's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    .
    Posts
    11,337
    Rep Points
    409983817

    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    Actually, your first link says: "However, high total protein intake, particularly high intake of nondairy animal protein, may accelerate renal function decline in women with mild renal insufficiency."
    Right. If they already have kidney damage, it MAY accelerate the existing damage. MAY. Even in cases of existing kidney damage, it's only conjecture.
    And your second link says: "To conclude, it appears, at least in the short term, that protein intake under 2.8 g/kg does not impair renal function in well-trained athletes." That's about 1.25 grams per pound.

    And I didn't say damage, I said _stress_. I don't know about you, but I don't want to make my kidneys work at a level anywhere near 100% capacity for extended periods of time. Yes, if you're healthy it's no big deal, but if you have 'weak' kidneys (ok, renal insufficiency), you would never know it while on an average diet. I'd rather avoid the potential of renal stress altogether by not oversupplementing protein.
    Better not lift weights then. Stresses the body. Creatinine levels go up, it's a terrible thing.


    Assuming a 160 lb male in his 30's who has a 'typical' physique:
    Average skeletal mass (including marrow) is about 24 lbs (15%)
    Average muscle mass 64 lbs (40%) and 28 lbs fat (17%).
    Plus 10-12 lbs of blood, 3 lbs brain, 3-4 lbs lungs....etc.

    RDA for the above average male is 50 grams of protein, but that's just for maintenance. Once he starts bodybuilding his _muscles_ will need more protein, but the rest of him won't (or will need minimal extra amounts). If our 160 lb guy bulked up to 220, he doubled his muscle mass, and I know quite a few 180 lb guys who carried less than 40% muscle (I was one, egads)

    I know recommending protein based on fat-free mass is common, but what works for a guy carrying 120 lbs of muscle with lots of myofibrullar hypertrophy (thus a much higher percentage of actin/myosin) is severe overkill for a 160 lb beginner with half the muscle, or less. So a 160 lb guy just starting out would be fine at 1 gram per pound simply because he's not supporting much muscle. Yet elite lifters might need closer to 2 grams per pound of LBM simply because they're a higher percentage of muscle. Not adjusting the equation to account for non-muscle mass means beginners are getting too much or elite lifters aren't getting enough.

    I dunno, but I think 50+(LBM-100)*2 gets you a more realistic number that would apply to a much broader range of individuals, without being too difficult math-wise.
    It kinda falls apart for chicks: I carry 119 lbs lean mass. 50+(119-100)*2 gives me a WHOPPING 88g of protein daily.

    I rely heavily upon protein for the satiety it induces; I was fat for a long time, and satiety may be permanently impaired in those of us who have lost a lot of bodyfat. If I get in less than about 180-200g of protein daily, I'm RAVENOUS.

    I'll offer something I posted a while back:

    Quote Originally Posted by Built View Post
    According to Bilsborough and Mann, the upper limit of what is considered safe is stated at 365 grams of protein for a person weighing 80kg - roughly 175 lbs. This works out to about 2.1 grams of protein per pound bodyweight.

    Nobody is zero percent bodyfat: healthy-lean for a man is about 10% bodyfat, and for a woman is about 20% bodyfat. The greatest amount of lean mass a person weighing 175 lbs can reasonably be expected to carry is 80%-90% of 175 lbs, which works out to 140-160 lbs.

    365 grams of protein daily - the top of the stated "safe" range for daily protein consumption for a person weighing 175 lbs, and therefore carrying at most 160 lbs of lean mass - works out to 2.3g of protein per pound lean mass.
    A Review of Issues of Dietary Protein Intake in Humans
    Shane Bilsborough and Neil Mann
    International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 2006, 16, 129-152 © 2006 Human Kinetics, Inc.
    Wondering where to start? Confused? "Homework 1" will get you started.

    Think you're ready for the "next step"? Take this test.

    Daredevils are Shredded
    Find out why...
    (Now you can find out why... in Hebrew!)



    Disclaimer: All health, fitness, diet, nutrition, anabolic steroid & supplement information posted here is intended for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice from a medical doctor. We do not condone the use of anabolic steroids (AAS), all information about AAS is for educational and entertainment purposes only. If you choose to use AAS it's your responsibility to know the laws of the country that you live in. Consult your physician or health care professional before performing any of the exercises, or following any diet, nutrition or supplement advice described on this website.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    BOARD REP


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Workin on it!
    Posts
    772
    Rep Points
    15529569

    I think its a proven fact that excess protein places stress on your kidneys.

  9. #9
    Bioidentical Bodybuilder
    ELITE MEMBER
    Built's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    .
    Posts
    11,337
    Rep Points
    409983817

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperLift View Post
    I think its a proven fact that excess protein places stress on your kidneys.
    News to me. So far, there has never been a single case of anyone with healthy kidneys being harmed by ANY level of protein intake.
    Wondering where to start? Confused? "Homework 1" will get you started.

    Think you're ready for the "next step"? Take this test.

    Daredevils are Shredded
    Find out why...
    (Now you can find out why... in Hebrew!)



    Disclaimer: All health, fitness, diet, nutrition, anabolic steroid & supplement information posted here is intended for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice from a medical doctor. We do not condone the use of anabolic steroids (AAS), all information about AAS is for educational and entertainment purposes only. If you choose to use AAS it's your responsibility to know the laws of the country that you live in. Consult your physician or health care professional before performing any of the exercises, or following any diet, nutrition or supplement advice described on this website.

  10. #10
    The Surgeon
    patricio's Avatar


    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Argentina
    Posts
    143
    Rep Points
    7521018

    As Built said, high protein diets have no negative impact on otherwise healthy kidneys.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21375795
    However, if you have a previous unknown kidney condition, it may worsen.
    So it'll do you no harm visiting your doctor and having a blood test before you start a very high protein diet

  11. #11
    Registered User
    330vert's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Uk
    Posts
    2
    Rep Points
    10

    Thanks for the feedback. I think its like so many things in this sport you have to get as much information as possible and make your decisions from there. Be it trial or error...

  12. #12
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    555
    Rep Points
    14203344

    Quote Originally Posted by Built View Post
    News to me. So far, there has never been a single case of anyone with healthy kidneys being harmed by ANY level of protein intake.
    Stop it with the straw man arguments already!
    No one has said anything about kidneys being HARMED by high protein intakes. In fact, I don't think kidneys can be harmed by protein unless you get whacked in the lower back by a 15 kilo bulk bag. We're talking about STRESS, meaning kidney function is pushed closer to (or past) its limits. Then you do have all sorts of harm happening because of too much waste product in the blood.

    Fact: 16% of Americans over the age of 20 have some degree of chronic kidney disease.
    Fact: Blood tests of urea/nitrogen or creatinine won't show abnormal levels until you've lost about 60% of your kidney function.
    Fact: Higher protein intake results in higher blood levels of metabolites which the kidneys must filter.

    All I'm saying is there's got to be a better way of recommending protein intake that is sufficient but not too much overkill, because overkill is bad for the wallet, and might overload one's kidneys. And while it's generally not a problem, I'd rather avoid beginners rolling dice, considering it's a 1 in 6 chance that they will have less than perfect kidneys. Not to mention that acetaminophen and ibuprofen use are associated with kidney dysfunction, and some weightlifters pop those things like candy (unless they've read up on their effects on protein synthesis, that is). Plus any other supplements they're taking may have an impact on how much 'work' is required of the kidneys.

    Quote Originally Posted by Built View Post
    It kinda falls apart for chicks: I carry 119 lbs lean mass. 50+(119-100)*2 gives me a WHOPPING 88g of protein daily.
    Yeah, women are about 35% muscle and 25% fat on average, not to mention generally smaller, and certainly don't hypertrophy like men. Definitely a whole 'nother ball game, formula-wise.

    I guess my sidetrack question is: Is it worth bothering to come up with a more accurate formula (or chart) that applies to a broader range of individuals (of both sexes) for recommending protein intake? Most of the gram per pound advice I've seen seems geared towards guys packing lots of muscle that needs to be maintained plus account for growth, not weak guys just starting out (which I think is probably half the readership, and maybe more considering experienced lifters wouldn't be looking for that information). Personally, I think there's a better way, I just don't know what all would need to be taken into account.

  13. #13
    "The Beast"
    ELITE MEMBER
    Dustdatarse's Avatar


    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    your a fucktard
    Posts
    626
    Rep Points
    34026854

    Hmm, interesting shit, thanks for the debate guys, just learned a few things.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    www.World-pharma.org

  14. #14
    Bioidentical Bodybuilder
    ELITE MEMBER
    Built's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    .
    Posts
    11,337
    Rep Points
    409983817

    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    Stop it with the straw man arguments already!
    No one has said anything about kidneys being HARMED by high protein intakes. In fact, I don't think kidneys can be harmed by protein unless you get whacked in the lower back by a 15 kilo bulk bag. We're talking about STRESS, meaning kidney function is pushed closer to (or past) its limits. Then you do have all sorts of harm happening because of too much waste product in the blood.
    If you thought stressing the kidney wouldn’t cause harm, you wouldn't have raised an alarm. Thus, I raised no straw man with you, okay? So relax. I misunderstood you - I thought you meant the stress to the kidney was harm to the kidney. Am I to understand you actually mean stress to the kidney causes harm to the rest of the body, is that it? I'd just like to be clear before I continue to argue; I'm not fond of a moving target.

    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    Fact: 16% of Americans over the age of 20 have some degree of chronic kidney disease.
    What proportion of these are fit, healthy athletes? It's a valid question - healthy athletes are able to handle stresses that obese, sedentary people might not.

    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    Fact: Blood tests of urea/nitrogen or creatinine won't show abnormal levels until you've lost about 60% of your kidney function.
    Look at some of mine sometime. The day after a workout, or a dose of creatine, and I've got flags on my bloodwork for creatinine - but normal GFR. Follow-up tests show normal creatinine - and still show normal GFR.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    Fact: Higher protein intake results in higher blood levels of metabolites which the kidneys must filter.
    So does a heavy workout.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    All I'm saying is there's got to be a better way of recommending protein intake that is sufficient but not too much overkill, because overkill is bad for the wallet, and might overload one's kidneys.
    High protein intake is satiating, and tends to help in the fight against obesity. Very good for healthy bones, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    And while it's generally not a problem, I'd rather avoid beginners rolling dice, considering it's a 1 in 6 chance that they will have less than perfect kidneys.
    based on your 16% above? Doubtful. You're implying the problem is genetic, not induced. I'd argue elevated blood glucose are behind a great deal of this figure.

    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    Not to mention that acetaminophen and ibuprofen use are associated with kidney dysfunction, and some weightlifters pop those things like candy (unless they've read up on their effects on protein synthesis, that is). Plus any other supplements they're taking may have an impact on how much 'work' is required of the kidneys.
    A lot of people pop analgesics like candy. I did, when I was fat and got headaches all the time. I don’t get 'em now that I eat a high protein diet. Go figure.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    Yeah, women are about 35% muscle and 25% fat on average, not to mention generally smaller, and certainly don't hypertrophy like men. Definitely a whole 'nother ball game, formula-wise.
    Our appetites are also more strongly regulated by CCK, which is strongly promoted by… wait for it… protein!
    Also, I assure you I am NEVER 25% bodyfat. The fattest I get is 19%, maybe 20% at the end of a bulk. Confirmed by DEXA, to save you from asking. I could NOT manage this on a low protein diet.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    I guess my sidetrack question is: Is it worth bothering to come up with a more accurate formula (or chart) that applies to a broader range of individuals (of both sexes) for recommending protein intake? Most of the gram per pound advice I've seen seems geared towards guys packing lots of muscle that needs to be maintained plus account for growth, not weak guys just starting out (which I think is probably half the readership, and maybe more considering experienced lifters wouldn't be looking for that information). Personally, I think there's a better way, I just don't know what all would need to be taken into account.
    I think a gram per pound lean mass is a pretty reasonable starting point for most folks, actually.

    I mean, look consider maintenance caloric intake is likely to be about 13 - 15 times their bodyweight in pounds. I'll attach this to a 178 lb man by means of an illustration. Suppose he's carrying 10% bodyfat. His lean mass is about 150 lbs, right?

    So, according to the various "rules of thumb" bandied around these parts, his baseline diet should be:

    Protein: at least 1g/lb lean mass (160g, providing 640 calories)
    Fat: at least 0.5g/lb lean mass (80g, providing 720 calories )
    Calories: 15 x bodyweight (rounding down to be safe, about 2600 calories)
    This leaves room for 1200 calories, which could come from carbohydrate, fat in excess of 80g, protein in excess of 160g or any combination of the three. If we leave it at the roughly 300g carbohydrate, buddy's diet turns into something that looks like this: (somebody, check the old woman's math, okay?)

    Baseline diet for bodyweight 178 lbs, 10% bodyfat, 160 lbs lean mass
    Calories: 2600
    Fat: 80g; 720 calories; about 30% of caloric intake
    Protein: 160g; 640 calories; about 25% of caloric intake
    Carbohydrate: 310g; 1240 calories; about 45% of caloric intake

    Nothing here is setting off any loud flags of concern regarding protein intake. Not to me, anyway. I'm not a fan of percentage based dietary approaches, but even looking at those, nothing here suggests this is a high protein diet - protein in this case makes up the lowest proportion of dietary intake.

    Even if buddy found his recovery was better and his energy levels and appetite improved when he increased his protein to just shy of 1.5g/lb lean mass and left fats alone, he still won't be floating in a sea of kidney death:

    Calories: 2600
    Fat: 80g; 720 calories; about 30% of caloric intake
    Protein: 235g; 940 calories; about 35% of caloric intake
    Carbohydrate: 235g; 940 calories; about 35% of caloric intake

    Now listen, I'm generally in agreement here that the importance of protein intake is monstrously overemphasized amongst those looking to pack on size, okay? Invariably it is too satiating; these guys leaning on extra protein find themselves "hardgainers" because they can't eat it all and they need to eat more of the foods that make getting in the extra calories easier.

    I only wish to point out that for one, there are other considerations than simply promoting muscle gain, and for another, the protein intake most folks in physical culture actually consume are likely well within a range that will do nothing but at best promote health, satiety and recovery - and at worst metabolize as somewhat expensive carbohydrate.
    Wondering where to start? Confused? "Homework 1" will get you started.

    Think you're ready for the "next step"? Take this test.

    Daredevils are Shredded
    Find out why...
    (Now you can find out why... in Hebrew!)



    Disclaimer: All health, fitness, diet, nutrition, anabolic steroid & supplement information posted here is intended for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice from a medical doctor. We do not condone the use of anabolic steroids (AAS), all information about AAS is for educational and entertainment purposes only. If you choose to use AAS it's your responsibility to know the laws of the country that you live in. Consult your physician or health care professional before performing any of the exercises, or following any diet, nutrition or supplement advice described on this website.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    BOARD REP


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Workin on it!
    Posts
    772
    Rep Points
    15529569

    Protein itself does not damage the kidneys. However, excessive amounts of protein puts extra stress on the kidneys. That's a fact. Im not saying that eating to much protein will put you into renal failure. Im just saying that it makes your kidneys work harder than they should have to. The human body is not designed to take in 500g protein every day, we are not lions..

  16. #16
    Bioidentical Bodybuilder
    ELITE MEMBER
    Built's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    .
    Posts
    11,337
    Rep Points
    409983817

    Quote Originally Posted by SuperLift View Post
    Protein itself does not damage the kidneys. However, excessive amounts of protein puts extra stress on the kidneys. That's a fact. Im not saying that eating to much protein will put you into renal failure. Im just saying that it makes your kidneys work harder than they should have to. The human body is not designed to take in 500g protein every day, we are not lions..
    You falsely accuse me of straw-man, then hand me hyperbole. I did not suggest 500g of protein daily.
    Wondering where to start? Confused? "Homework 1" will get you started.

    Think you're ready for the "next step"? Take this test.

    Daredevils are Shredded
    Find out why...
    (Now you can find out why... in Hebrew!)



    Disclaimer: All health, fitness, diet, nutrition, anabolic steroid & supplement information posted here is intended for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice from a medical doctor. We do not condone the use of anabolic steroids (AAS), all information about AAS is for educational and entertainment purposes only. If you choose to use AAS it's your responsibility to know the laws of the country that you live in. Consult your physician or health care professional before performing any of the exercises, or following any diet, nutrition or supplement advice described on this website.

  17. #17
    Registered User
    Sidney's Avatar


    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    245
    Rep Points
    8751569

    Every person is different based on musculature and height. Everyone's body is different. Athletes do require more protein because they put moer stress on the muscle. What protein your body doesn't use goes into the toilet. There is no perfect number for how much to take in. The body supposably the body absorbs 25-30 grams at a time. Protein is digested about every 2 hours. Thats why so many diets involve eating every 2-3 hours.

  18. #18
    Bioidentical Bodybuilder
    ELITE MEMBER
    Built's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    .
    Posts
    11,337
    Rep Points
    409983817

    Quote Originally Posted by Sidney View Post
    What protein your body doesn't use goes into the toilet.
    False.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sidney View Post
    he body supposably the body absorbs 25-30 grams at a time.
    Also false.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sidney View Post
    Protein is digested about every 2 hours. Thats why so many diets involve eating every 2-3 hours.
    Although it's turning out to not be true; we may grow muscle better when its consumption is pulsed.
    Wondering where to start? Confused? "Homework 1" will get you started.

    Think you're ready for the "next step"? Take this test.

    Daredevils are Shredded
    Find out why...
    (Now you can find out why... in Hebrew!)



    Disclaimer: All health, fitness, diet, nutrition, anabolic steroid & supplement information posted here is intended for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice from a medical doctor. We do not condone the use of anabolic steroids (AAS), all information about AAS is for educational and entertainment purposes only. If you choose to use AAS it's your responsibility to know the laws of the country that you live in. Consult your physician or health care professional before performing any of the exercises, or following any diet, nutrition or supplement advice described on this website.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-27-2011, 01:52 PM
  2. % Body Fat Calculation
    By NJ-Surfer in forum Diet & Nutrition
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 02-01-2010, 07:38 PM
  3. BF Calculation
    By JAja04 in forum Diet & Nutrition
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-09-2009, 07:42 PM
  4. VO2 Max calculation help..
    By Art in forum Training
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 06-22-2009, 02:52 AM
  5. The Practical Scientist, Protein Requirements
    By Quinc in forum Diet & Nutrition
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-09-2007, 11:18 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
-->