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Harry Dent: “Major Crash” Coming for Stocks, Commodities Already Topping Out

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  1. #1
    Is Doin It 4 Da Shorteez
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    Harry Dent: “Major Crash” Coming for Stocks, Commodities Already Topping Out






    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

  2. #2
    primeau
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    he has a few solid points (mainly silver, gold, and oil overvaluation)...but I'm not so hot on his over arching view and use of Elliot Wave Theory. Depressions, recessions, and bubbles more often than not are mutually exclusive events when comparing the 1920s, 1930s, 1990s, 2010s etc.

    oil etfs should have been shorted after the Lybian debacle caused knee jerk overreaction last month.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by lnvanry View Post
    he has a few solid points (mainly silver, gold, and oil overvaluation)...but I'm not so hot on his over arching view and use of Elliot Wave Theory. Depressions, recessions, and bubbles more often than not are mutually exclusive events when comparing the 1920s, 1930s, 1990s, 2010s etc.

    oil etfs should have been shorted after the Lybian debacle caused knee jerk overreaction last month.
    I wouldn't be so quick disregard his forecasts regarding the markets, Dent is one of the few that merges forecasting, with economic theory and gerontology.

    in regards to many banks, etc. they are simply over-capitalized right now, too many idle funds earning low interest.
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

  4. #4
    Sancho
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    The stock market will take a shit/correction as soon as QE2 goes away. As long as Obama is fighting a war for oil he can't win and the middle east is up in arms, oil will continue to climb over greedy Jew speculation.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Pimpin View Post
    The stock market will take a shit/correction as soon as QE2 goes away. As long as Obama is fighting a war for oil he can't win and the middle east is up in arms, oil will continue to climb over greedy Jew speculation.
    here's some info that represents that take pretty clearly

    Goldman Sachs is not convinced that QE2 will have a significant impact on the equity markets from current levels. In a recent strategy note (via Zero Hedge) they cited the primary reason why QE2 was likely already fully priced in and unlikely to impact the real economy heading into 2011:

    We believe QE2 is unlikely to change our sales or margin forecasts, so return prospects become a valuation debate. Our targets imply less upside, given 13.5x P/E is consistent with prior 1-2% real rate regimes.

    The bullish argument for equities goes as follows: (1) The Fed buys longdated Treasuries to reduce term premium and lower interest rates across the maturity spectrum; (2) The low yields penalize individuals and corporations who hold cash; (3) individuals and institutional investors re-allocate their savings into higher risk instruments such as equities, high yield bonds, emerging market debt and equity, and commodities; (4) firms pursue new capital spending initiatives and boost employment; (5) asset price inflation has a wealth effect and spurs retail spending; (6) a consequence of lower US interest rates is a weaker US Dollar which benefits US exporters and also stimulates some incremental domestic job growth.

    Our year-end 2010 price target for the S&P 500 remains 1200 or 1% above the current level of 1183. We expect the S&P 500 will trade sideways during 1Q before rising during the subsequent six months. Our 12-month forecast of 1275 reflects a price return of 8% and a total return including dividends of 10%. For details, see our report US Equity Views: Updating our price targets as investors focus on 2011 (October 15, 2010).

    Three topics drive our view of the trajectory of the US equity market. (1) Sales; (2) profit margins; and (3) money flow. Below we briefly outline how each of these items will be affected by the pending QE2.

    1. QE2 is unlikely to change our sales forecasts. Goldman Sachs Economics 2011 US GDP growth forecast already incorporates at least $1 trillion of Treasury purchases by the Fed. Despite the hefty forecast of Fed purchases, our 1.8% GDP growth forecast remains below the consensus expectation of 2.5%. The buy-side seems to be in the 2.0%-2 ¼% range. Our current index and sector-level sales forecasts incorporate our GDP growth assumptions and therefore already capture QE2. Capacity utilization hovers at 74%, up from the March 2009 low of 68% but below the 81% long-term average, so firms are not compelled to fast-track new projects despite the availability of cheap financing. The US has a demand, not a supply, problem. The US Dollar has weakened in the 12 weeks since QE2 entered public debate and it will benefit revenues of US companies, although by less than many investors believe. S&P 500 generates just 30% of sales outside the US.

    2. QE2 is unlikely to change our margin forecasts. Our index and sector level net margin estimates incorporate our US and world GDP, interest rate, inflation, oil and US Dollar forecasts and the firm’s macroeconomic view assumes $1 trillion of QE2. If the Fed successfully spurs higher inflation than we currently assume (1.1% in 2011), it will have a negative impact on profit margins because rising input costs will not be fully-passed through to the consumer. Passing inflation along to the end customer will be particularly difficult in an environment with nearly 10% unemployment. Our 8.4% net margin forecast stands below bottom-up consensus of 9.0%. The Fed’s desire to re-inflate the economy tilts margin risk lower rather than higher. Firms reporting negative margin surprises in 3Q span the value chain from raw (X, AKS, NUE, MEE) to intermediate (GENZ, LLTC, BMS) to end-demand (AN, AVP, KMB, SLB, EFX, AVY, T) to cite just a few examples.

    3. Therefore, QE2’s potential impact on the US equity market reduces to a debate over valuation. Bulls argue stocks are dramatically undervalued relative to bonds. It is true that using Treasuries, BBB corporate bonds, or TIPs in the Fed model leads to a conclusion the S&P 500 is 20% undervalued. Bulls similarly argue that QE2 will drive both yields and risk lower, reduce the cost of equity, and support a DDM valuation above our 12-month target. Bulls implicitly argue stocks should trade at a higher P/E multiple. Our more modest return projection incorporates a current starting point valuation that shows stocks trade at a 13.5x NTM P/E multiple consistent with past real interest rate regimes of 1-2%. However, the current P/E multiple is calculated when margins stand at all-time highs. A P/E assuming normalized margins would be 14.6x closer to the long-term average. We believe the forward path of stocks will be determined by potential asset allocation shifts by owners of 70% of the US equity market. Individuals own in aggregate 53% and pension funds own 17%. Shares will trade sustainably higher if these investor groups decide to re-risk from bonds to stocks. Any shifts most likely will be gradual.

    http://pragcap.com/goldman-qe2-drive...-prices-higher
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

  6. #6
    primeau
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    guys, QE2 (and future monetary expansions) aren't executed to just stimulate the economy...they are a branch of US foreign policy to combat the yuan.

    You could argue that the latter is the real motive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lnvanry View Post
    guys, QE2 (and future monetary expansions) aren't executed to just stimulate the economy...they are a branch of US foreign policy to combat the yuan.

    You could argue that the latter is the real motive.
    QE2 is all about the quantitative easing of monetary policy....this recession is not following the typical pattern of those in the past.

    monetary policy is another part of economics that effects the "free markets"
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

  8. #8
    primeau
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    Quote Originally Posted by LAM View Post
    QE2 is all about the quantitative easing of monetary policy....this recession is not following the typical pattern of those in the past.

    monetary policy is another part of economics that effects the "free markets"
    I respectfully disagree...this is what the FED and Treasury Dept want the public to buy into...hence the name. I believe the economic benefit is actually ancillary...the top motive is foreign policy IMHO.

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