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Vitamin D deficiency may be linked to type 2 diabetes risk in Caucasians

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    Vitamin D deficiency may be linked to type 2 diabetes risk in Caucasians

    Vitamin D deficiency may be linked to type 2 diabetes risk in Caucasians, study finds

    Vitamin D deficiency may contribute to racial differences in the way fat is stored in the body and increase the risk of type 2 diabetes among obese Caucasian children, according to a new study from a team of University of Pittsburgh researchers.

    The results, which were published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, showed that both Caucasian and African-American children with vitamin D deficiencies were more likely to be obese. However, Caucasians tended to have higher levels of visceral fat, which has been shown to increase an individual's risk of developing type 2 diabetes, while African-American teens were more likely to have excess subcutaneous fat, which does not carry as much risk.

    The researchers said that both vitamin D deficiency and type 2 diabetes have been increasing rapidly in the last few years, particularly among young people. Their findings show that the two issues may be more closely related than previously thought.

    "Vitamin D deficiency is rampant in American youth, and there is some suggestion in adults that low levels of vitamin D may be playing a role in the increasing rates of type 2 diabetes. It is possible the same may be true for youth with type 2 diabetes," said Silvia Arslanian, who led the investigation.

    For the study, the researchers examined 237 young people between the ages of 8 and 18. After testing vitamin D levels and taking body fat measurements, they found that those with the lowest levels of the nutrient, regardless of race, were more likely to have high levels of body fat. However, only Caucasian youths had elevated levels of the more dangerous visceral fat, which surrounds inner organs.

    Arslanian added that screening more children for vitamin D deficiency may


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    Remember, association does not mean causation. We have to make sure the confounding variable ( teenagers who excercise more are outside and teenagers who sit and play video games are more likely to be inside) is not artificially slewing this association.

    However, I believe it plays a role. A very good prospective study ( unlike this study) in Finland showed giving huge doses of vitamin d to infants prevented Type I diabetes in the future by a significant amount and followed them for 30 years.

    http://bastyrcenter.org/content/view/749/&page=

    Thirty years later, participants were surveyed to determine whether they had developed type I diabetes. The results of the study showed that infants who were given 2,000 IU or more of supplemental vitamin D per day had an 80% lower risk of developing type I diabetes, compared with infants who were given less than that amount
    Needless to say, I gave my daughter this dose of vitamin d from day one 9 yrs ago before the APA increased its requirements for children and infants.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandaidwoman View Post
    Remember, association does not mean causation. We have to make sure the confounding variable ( teenagers who excercise more are outside and teenagers who sit and play video games are more likely to be inside) is not artificially slewing this association.

    However, I believe it plays a role. a very good prospective study ( unlike this study) in Finland showed giving huge doses of vitamin d to infants prevented Type I diabetes in the future by a significant amount.
    As far as I'm aware you can only be born with Type I diabetes. Its only Type II that can be prevented.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BillHicksFan View Post
    As far as I'm aware you can only be born with Type I diabetes. Its only Type II that can be prevented.
    No, type II is the genetic one that is more strongly inherited ( and environmental triggers like obesity, diet etc can trigger it though there are slim Type IIs and we make sure they are not misdiagnosed Type 1.5s) Type I is multivariable and can be genetic but many are considered an autoimmune disease, much like Hashimoto's thyroiditis where the endocrine gland ( in this case thyroid vs pancreas) gets wiped out by antibodies. In twin studies if one gets Type I the other twin gets it less than 1/3 of the time, for type II, if one twin gets it the other gets it almost 3/4 times. I clearly see a family trend of type II diabetes when I do my family trees ( I study type 1.5 or LADA) and rarely get type I being passed on as consistently. ( and usually it is more genetic in caucasians)

    This is a good article on the autoimmune nature of Type I diabetes

    http://www.suite101.com/content/type...iabetes-a57975

    The Type 1.5 or LADA is upsetting because at first these folks get told they have type II, they eat right, excercise, are body builders or bicyclists etc. and gradually, their pancreas gets destroyed slowly ( not overnite like type I) and they have to go on insulin. It is an emotionally hard pill to swallow knowing they will end up being just like and adult version of Type I and nothing they do will help prevent it....... for some ungodly reason, most endocrinologists don't bother sorting this entity out, it's usually practioners like myself who have taken an academic interest in this..
    Last edited by bandaidwoman; 04-28-2011 at 07:43 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandaidwoman View Post
    No, type II is the genetic one that is more strongly inherited ( and environmental triggers like obesity, diet etc can trigger it though there are slim Type IIs and we make sure they are not misdiagnosed Type 1.5s) Type I is multivariable and can be genetic but many are considered an autoimmune disease, much like Hashimoto's thyroiditis where the endocrine gland ( in this case thyroid vs pancreas) gets wiped out by antibodies. In twin studies if one gets Type I the other twin gets it less than 1/3 of the time, for type II, if one twin gets it the other gets it almost 3/4 times. I clearly see a family trend of type II diabetes when I do my family trees ( I study type 1.5 or LADA) and rarely get type I being passed on as consistently. ( and usually it is more genetic in caucasians)

    This is a good article on the autoimmune nature of Type I diabetes

    Type 1 (Autoimmune) Diabetes: The Role of Autoantibodies in Disease Development and Prediction | Suite101.com

    The Type 1.5 or LADA is upsetting because at first these folks get told they have type II, they eat right, excercise, are body builders or bicyclists etc. and gradually, their pancreas gets destroyed slowly ( not overnite like type I) and they have to go on insulin. It is an emotionally hard pill to swallow knowing they will end up being just like and adult version of Type I and nothing they do will help prevent it....... for some ungodly reason, most endocrinologists don't bother sorting this entity out, it's usually practioners like myself who have taken an academic interest in this..
    Indeed you are right. I had confused the details of Type I & 2 although I feel it's a cop out to say that Type 2 is hereditary. It seems to me that Type II diabetes would be as hereditary as lung cancer is to smokers.

    I have a friend who was born with Type I diabetes and she is insulin dependant while I have an aunty who is the laziest person I know (over weight, sits around all day for her entire life and just eats and talks) who developed Type II diabetes at age 60 so this is where the confusion came from.

    My sister experiences all the symptoms of Hashimoto's disease and is often tested for diabetes due to symptoms suggesting she is a diabetic. All of which come back negative. I'll often quiz people about things such as this as she struggles with her weight despite not eating much at all and she always appears to be full of fluid (puffy wrists and arms). An abnormally high level of white blood cells means that she has borderline Leucemia too so again I just want to learn as much as I can about things such as this.

    Thanks for clarifying.

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    does using a vitamin d supp really help

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