The 7 Rules of Good Nutrition

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    The 7 Rules of Good Nutrition






    The 7 Rules of Good Nutrition
    By Dr. John M Berardi, Ph.D.

    Here’s my take on it. I call these principles, "The 7 Rules of Good Nutrition."

    These aren’t the newest techniques from the latest cutting-edge plan. Rather, they are simple, time-tested, no nonsense habits that you need to get into when designing a good eating program.

    1. Eat every 2-3 hours, no matter what. You should eat between 5-8 meals per day.
    2. Eat complete (containing all the essential amino acids), lean protein with each meal.
    3. Eat fruits and/or vegetables with each food meal.
    4. Ensure that your carbohydrate intake comes from fruits and vegetables. Exception: workout and post-workout drinks and meals.
    5. Ensure that 25-35% of your energy intake comes from fat, with your fat intake split equally between saturates (e.g. animal fat), monounsaturates (e.g., olive oil), and polyunsaturates (e.g. flax oil, salmon oil).
    6. Drink only non-calorie containing beverages, the best choices being water and green tea.
    7. Eat mostly whole foods (except workout and post-workout drinks).

    So what about calories or macronutrient ratios? The short answer is that if you aren’t already practicing the above-mentioned habits, and by practicing them I mean putting them to use over 90% of the time (i.e., no more than 4 meals out of an average 42 meals per week violate any of those rules), everything else is pretty pointless.

    Moreover, many people can achieve the health and the body composition they desire following these 7 rules alone. No kidding! In fact, with some of my clients I spend the first few months just supervising their adherence to these 7 rules—an effective but costly way to learn them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt James View Post
    (snip)

    1. Eat every 2-3 hours, no matter what. You should eat between 5-8 meals per day.

    Built in 3... 2... 1...





    Posting the article for general information, but realize that no one system is gospel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt James View Post
    [/LIST]
    Built in 3... 2... 1...
    Ok, I'll bite on this one too.
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt James View Post
    The 7 Rules of Good Nutrition
    By Dr. John M Berardi, Ph.D.

    1. Eat every 2-3 hours, no matter what. You should eat between 5-8 meals per day.
    2. Eat complete (containing all the essential amino acids), lean protein with each meal.
    3. Eat fruits and/or vegetables with each food meal.
    4. Ensure that your carbohydrate intake comes from fruits and vegetables. Exception: workout and post-workout drinks and meals.
    5. Ensure that 25-35% of your energy intake comes from fat, with your fat intake split equally between saturates (e.g. animal fat), monounsaturates (e.g., olive oil), and polyunsaturates (e.g. flax oil, salmon oil).
    6. Drink only non-calorie containing beverages, the best choices being water and green tea.
    7. Eat mostly whole foods (except workout and post-workout drinks).
    First, Berardi is known as a die-hard 6-meal-a-day fanatic. However, he's certainly open to trying out others' ideas to better understand them. He recently tried out various Intermittent Fasting styles and wrote about his experiences in a free e-book available here:
    Intermittent Fasting | Free E-Book | Precision Nutrition Coaching

    And TN did an interview with him about it here, with some good photos:
    T NATION | John Berardi's Great Fasting Experiment

    So... re:
    1. Personally, I'm aware of 3 general 'styles' of eating timing: constant input (eating every 2 hours), Intermittent Fasting, and 'pulsed' (meal timing designed to let blood nutrient levels return to baseline between meals). Each has its advantages.
    2. I agree 100%
    3. General agreement, but vegetables are mostly about vitamins and minerals, so if you're taking vitamins the importance of veggies with _every_ meal is diminished.
    4. What, no grains? No rice or pasta? Unless I buy stock in a potato farm, there's no way I want to get 1500 calories a day from just veggies. I'm not totally against fruit the way Built is, but I'm not a big fruit eater.
    5. Almost 100% agreement. I go by a minimum fat requirement, not an energy percentage. I eat the same amount of fat regardless of energy needs, and only adjust my carbs. On lifting days, the extra 600 to 1000 calories I burn are mostly glycogen, and I want carbs to replenish that energy, not fat.
    6. I disagree. What does the man have against milk or fruit juice?
    7. I agree 100%

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    Intermediate Fasting

    Quote Originally Posted by Curt James View Post
    The 7 Rules of Good Nutrition
    By Dr. John M Berardi, Ph.D.

    Eat every 2-3 hours, no matter what. You should eat between 5-8 meals per day.
    Berardi's Rule Exception

    Berardi's has rethought this rule. Berardi's now consider Intermediate Fasting to be another effective method.

    T NATION | John Berardi's Great Fasting Experiment

    "In my case, while experimenting with different types of intermittent fasting, I lost about 20 pounds of fat while preserving most of my lean mass."

    Kenny Croxdale

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    4. What, no grains?
    Lectin.
    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    6. I disagree. What does the man have against milk or fruit juice?
    I'd have to agree on the pasteurized milk. Raw milk would be different but pasteurized has all the good stuff removed & Fruit juice is mostly sugar.
    Quote Originally Posted by sassy69 View Post
    Pink weights don't count as 'working out".

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThreeGigs View Post
    Ok, I'll bite on this one too.


    First, Berardi is known as a die-hard 6-meal-a-day fanatic. However, he's certainly open to trying out others' ideas to better understand them. He recently tried out various Intermittent Fasting styles and wrote about his experiences in a free e-book available here:
    Intermittent Fasting | Free E-Book | Precision Nutrition Coaching

    And TN did an interview with him about it here, with some good photos:
    T NATION | John Berardi's Great Fasting Experiment

    So... re:
    1. Personally, I'm aware of 3 general 'styles' of eating timing: constant input (eating every 2 hours), Intermittent Fasting, and 'pulsed' (meal timing designed to let blood nutrient levels return to baseline between meals). Each has its advantages.
    2. I agree 100%
    3. General agreement, but vegetables are mostly about vitamins and minerals, so if you're taking vitamins the importance of veggies with _every_ meal is diminished.
    4. What, no grains? No rice or pasta? Unless I buy stock in a potato farm, there's no way I want to get 1500 calories a day from just veggies. I'm not totally against fruit the way Built is, but I'm not a big fruit eater.
    5. Almost 100% agreement. I go by a minimum fat requirement, not an energy percentage. I eat the same amount of fat regardless of energy needs, and only adjust my carbs. On lifting days, the extra 600 to 1000 calories I burn are mostly glycogen, and I want carbs to replenish that energy, not fat.
    6. I disagree. What does the man have against milk or fruit juice?
    7. I agree 100%

    Great post.
    I disagree with you on 3, however.

    You're forgetting the FIBER!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TooOld View Post
    Lectin.

    I'd have to agree on the pasteurized milk. Raw milk would be different but pasteurized has all the good stuff removed & Fruit juice is mostly sugar.

    Except protein, fat, and carbs (non fructose), and calcium (also vitamin D is usually added) ....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt James View Post
    The 7 Rules of Good Nutrition

    1. Eat every 2-3 hours, no matter what. You should eat between 5-8 meals per day.
    WTF is this bullshit? Nutrient timing doesn't matter as long as you get your post-workout nutrition and hit your daily targets. Fuck, why won't people learn this?

    The rest of the list is gold though.
    "Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens" -Jimi Hendrix
    Check out http://anabolicsteroidforums.com !

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thee_One View Post
    Except protein, fat, and carbs (non fructose), and calcium (also vitamin D is usually added) ....
    Meant to say Homogenized, not pasteurized...anyway. OK Vitamin D, you got me there but how much? Maybe 500ui's a quart? Does anybody know?
    Calcium: The calcium is pretty much undigestible from milk because the enzymes that aid in this digestion are taken out.

    Fats: Homogenizing breaks down these fats in a way that they are easily absorbed by the villi in the small intestines. And once absorbed they make their way into our arteries leading to cardiovascular issues.

    So, no thank you. I'll get my proteins, fats, calcium & vitamin d from better sources.
    Quote Originally Posted by sassy69 View Post
    Pink weights don't count as 'working out".

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    Quote Originally Posted by TooOld View Post
    Meant to say Homogenized, not pasteurized...anyway. OK Vitamin D, you got me there but how much? Maybe 500ui's a quart? Does anybody know?
    Calcium: The calcium is pretty much undigestible from milk because the enzymes that aid in this digestion are taken out.

    Fats: Homogenizing breaks down these fats in a way that they are easily absorbed by the villi in the small intestines. And once absorbed they make their way into our arteries leading to cardiovascular issues.

    So, no thank you. I'll get my proteins, fats, calcium & vitamin d from better sources.

    So buy Pasteurized milk only.
    The brand I buy, says "organic" and it says Pasteurized on the carton, but not homogenized.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TooOld View Post
    Meant to say Homogenized, not pasteurized...anyway. OK Vitamin D, you got me there but how much? Maybe 500ui's a quart? Does anybody know?
    Calcium: The calcium is pretty much undigestible from milk because the enzymes that aid in this digestion are taken out.

    Fats: Homogenizing breaks down these fats in a way that they are easily absorbed by the villi in the small intestines. And once absorbed they make their way into our arteries leading to cardiovascular issues.

    So, no thank you. I'll get my proteins, fats, calcium & vitamin d from better sources.

    On Calcium.
    If this is true, then where to get calcium???
    You can't get it from supplements then either, b/c those have no enzymes.
    So wtf?

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    I prefer leafy green veggies.
    Quote Originally Posted by sassy69 View Post
    Pink weights don't count as 'working out".

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    # 1 Eat something every 3 hours
    The truth is that if you want to increase muscle mass you must eat enough, and nothing beats eating every 2-3 hours, which ends in being 6-8 meals per day. Eating frequently ensures a constant intake of protein , carbohydrates and essential fats needed to stay in an anabolic state. By following the rule of 3 hours, you should eat at least the same number of carbohydrates (or up to two times more) than protein to each meal, just with fewer fats. Because you are eating every three hours, do not eat too much at one meal, it is important to maintain relatively small meals for better absorption of nutrients and minimize body fat augmentation.


    When no insulin in the body, fat burning process is adversely affected. Low levels of insulin with high levels of amino acids (a product of relatively little to eat, but several times in the day) helps combat this situation.

    # 2 Eat enough protein
    Never eat a meal without protein. To maximize muscle building, you should consume at least 1g to 1.5g of protein per pound of body mass or 2 grams per kilogram. (This means that if you measure 180 pounds, 82 pounds, needs to consume 180 grams of protein per day to 270.) To ensure that consume enough grams of protein a day, you must divide your daily need for protein by the number of meals it consumes. For example, if you eat 6 meals a day, 180 grams of protein divided by 6 meals tells us that we should consume at least 30 grams of protein per meal.

    Its principal sources of protein should be meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and almost anything that comes from animals.

    Also, try to vary your protein sources to ensure the growth of muscles.

    # 3 Hydrate

    The importance of drinking enough fluids that goes beyond the obvious benefits of staying hydrated to a deeper level, is about the importance of having more water into muscle cells. The more water you have in your muscles, better than working, which means it will be stronger and increase their ability to grow. "The consensus in the bodybuilding community is that a high water level in the muscle acts as an anabolic factor," says Chris Aceto, consultant nutritionist Mr. Olympia Jay Cutler Bodybuilding Champion and author (Bodybuilding Champion) and Everthing You Need to Know About Fat Loss (Everything You Need to Know About Weight Loss). "This allows the muscle to maintain a positive nitrogen balance, which directly supports the growth of muscles."

    And if you are supplementing with creatine and glutamine, your muscles will have a better ability to store water, because when supplemented with these, more water is stored in muscles. Eat at least 1 gallon of water (about 16 spleens of water) every day and take about 8 oz (1 spleen) of water every 15-20 minutes during a workout .

    # 4 Eat carbohydrates in good shape

    As for carbohydrates, very little and your body will not grow much, and you consume too many risks greatly increase body fat. A good rule of thumb is to consume 2 grams of carbohydrate per pound of body mass per day when trying to gain weight. As with protein, you should divide your requirement by the name of foods you eat, with the exception of two times a day: breakfast and immediately after a workout to an hour later.


    More, the breakfast and lunch after training are vital in the development of muscle mass because high carbohydrate intake increases one of the hormones responsible for the absorption of nutrients into the muscles. In most of the foods you should eat complex carbohydrates, ie consume carbohydrates your body more slowly than simple carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates are foods like pasta, bread (white bread is composed of simple carbohydrates), oatmeal and potatoes. Complex carbohydrates help build muscles and give the body the energy needed for the entire day's activity.

    # 5 Eat red meat
    It is common that people try to avoid steaks and pies by the high fat amount. But when you are looking to increase muscle, ignoring the red meat is the last thing you want to do: it is rich in B vitamins, including , which Supports muscle strength and endurance and growth, others have more gram for gram, iron, creatine and zinc than any other source of protein. These nutrients take important roles in muscle recovery and growth, so if you only eat chicken, turkey, protein powders, it takes more time doing physical targets. "Red meat is a great source of protein is digested slowly and help us to maintain high levels of proteins in the body," says Aragon, a nutritionist with studies in the United States. "Red meat can be used in any meeting, not only in the sessions to increase in mass."

    That said, it is important to note that when you are choosing appropriate types of red meat, it is best to select those that have less fat.

    # 6 Eat fish

    Fish offer advantages other protein sources are not as fatty acids omega-3, which can indirectly burn your body fat and increase muscle mass. Omega-3 helps the body produce energy for training and all the day's activities. Also, help prevent muscle soreness and aid in the recovery of the body by helping the immune system. Nor have to overdo with fish, but eating one every now and then a week will help in the long run.

    Fish is an excellent source of protein, amino acids that are very beneficial in improving muscle growth.
    Omega-3 can increase insulin sensitivity in woven, which makes less insulin is needed to absorb the necessary nutrients, what benefits you in burning fat.

    # 7 Protect muscle mass with meals before and after training
    There is a hormone called cortisol that adversely affects muscle building to the point that back in the good way is not so simple to follow the ground rules. The solution? Eating good food and supplementing the before and after a workout. It is at this time that whey protein is essential because it gets into the bloodstream faster than any other protein source, providing amino acids to boost muscle growth and interfere with the absorption of cortisol. A slow absorbing protein like casein takes longer to combat cortisol levels.

    You should also add rapidly absorbed carbohydrates such as Gatorade to benefit even more. Carbohydrates, when combined with whey protein, are well effective, and almost immediately, stopping muscle breakdown. According to Aragon, when you combine carbohydrates with protein before and after training resulted in increased protein synthesis and inhibit protein degradation in our muscles.

    Consume at least 20 grams of whey protein before a workout and 40 grams after training, a slow digestion of carbohydrates 30 minutes before training and rapid digestion of carbohydrates immediately after along with their serum.

    As for the fat in the diet, before and after training are the two times of day you want to give up eating foods high in fat. Will decrease the absorption of proteins and carbohydrates, which will delay the process of muscle recovery.



    # 8 Schedule a day of "GROWTH"
    While eating and dieting in implementing previous rules is the foundation for growth, have a day of "growth" every week or two mass which eats beyond what is normally consumed (by increasing the intake of protein, carbohydrates and overall calorie intake) can activate growth hormones in the body that help increase muscle. Some people call today a "cheat day or cheat day." When occasionally over eat, the body responds by releasing hormones such as growth hormone, thyroid, and possibly testosterone. So even a small boost in one or all of these can positively impact muscle recovery and growth.

    When you eat clean all the time we run the risk of being bored and lose concentration in the diet,.Periodic increases in caloric intake is a good way to reach a net excess heat, which helps to increase strength and muscle size. But it is important to ensure that the days of "growth" or days "trick" to be once a week or two, does not become something every day. "
    Last edited by fatburners; 12-11-2011 at 09:31 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by squigader View Post
    WTF is this bullshit? Nutrient timing doesn't matter as long as you get your post-workout nutrition and hit your daily targets. Fuck, why won't people learn this?

    The rest of the list is gold though.
    So maintaining stable blood sugar levels has no effect on insulin and fat gain... I'd go back and check out some nutritional/dietary facts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TooOld View Post
    ..... Fruit juice is mostly sugar.
    high fructose corn syrup in most cases.

    after watching that HFCS vid that Built posted awhile back (Some Dr. guy talking at UCal Berkely - awesome stuff), and reading some other material on the subject, I'm trying hard never to intake in any hfcs
    note to self: rep Built for posting that very interesting vid, I'd forgotten to do that

    edit: I'm pretty sure it was Built, I can't seem to find the post now...
    Last edited by Ted Shred; 12-11-2011 at 10:49 AM.

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