Strength athletes gain more strength by training properly

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  1. #1
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    Strength athletes gain more strength by training properly

    Strength athletes gain more strength by training properly

    Almost every strength athlete is familiar with the dilemma: should I train 'properly' and therefore use a weight that is nothing special? Or should I go for the more impressive weights, which means I can't make full reps? Choose the first option, advise sports scientists at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. This way you'll build more strength in the long run.

    The researchers will soon publish in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research the results of an experiment they did with 40 males in their twenties. Ten men in the control group did nothing for ten weeks; thirty men trained their biceps twice a week on a sitting curl machine.

    Fifteen of the thirty men trained their biceps with a weight at which they could make full reps [FULL]. The figure below shows what Full ROM means.

    The other fifteen men [PART] trained their biceps by doing only a Partial ROM. The men in the PART group trained with 10 kg heavier weights than the men in the FULL group did.



    At the end of the ten weeks the maximal strength of the FULL group had increased by 26 percent. The increase in the PART group was only 16 percent. The researchers could not detect an effect on muscle mass. There was no difference in the increase in muscle thickness [MT] between the two groups.





    The researchers speculate that if you train your muscles with full reps they 'recruit' more muscle fibres for this, and therefore the training effect is greater. Another possibility is that full reps lead to better circulation of blood in the muscle, and therefore also to a better supply of oxygen and nutrients.

    Source:
    J Strength Cond Res. 2011 Oct 24. [Epub ahead of print].
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    That's not too surprising. In the long run, that increased strength should theoretically facilitate greater mass gains too. That would be hard to display in a research study of this duration, but perhaps a longer duration study would be more enlightening.
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    Good stuff...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prince View Post
    Strength athletes gain more strength by training properly

    Almost every strength athlete is familiar with the dilemma: should I train 'properly' and therefore use a weight that is nothing special? Or should I go for the more impressive weights, which means I can't make full reps? Choose the first option, advise sports scientists at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. This way you'll build more strength in the long run.

    The researchers will soon publish in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research the results of an experiment they did with 40 males in their twenties. Ten men in the control group did nothing for ten weeks; thirty men trained their biceps twice a week on a sitting curl machine.

    Fifteen of the thirty men trained their biceps with a weight at which they could make full reps [FULL]. The figure below shows what Full ROM means.

    The other fifteen men [PART] trained their biceps by doing only a Partial ROM. The men in the PART group trained with 10 kg heavier weights than the men in the FULL group did.



    At the end of the ten weeks the maximal strength of the FULL group had increased by 26 percent. The increase in the PART group was only 16 percent. The researchers could not detect an effect on muscle mass. There was no difference in the increase in muscle thickness [MT] between the two groups.





    The researchers speculate that if you train your muscles with full reps they 'recruit' more muscle fibres for this, and therefore the training effect is greater. Another possibility is that full reps lead to better circulation of blood in the muscle, and therefore also to a better supply of oxygen and nutrients.

    Source:
    J Strength Cond Res. 2011 Oct 24. [Epub ahead of print].

    Nice post bro.I dont do halved unless im doing 21's
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    I think the occasional cheat sets, especially on curls, as well as negatives and forced reps help but not frequently.
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    It's def a science

    Quote Originally Posted by Prince View Post
    Strength athletes gain more strength by training properly

    Almost every strength athlete is familiar with the dilemma: should I train 'properly' and therefore use a weight that is nothing special? Or should I go for the more impressive weights, which means I can't make full reps? Choose the first option, advise sports scientists at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. This way you'll build more strength in the long run.

    The researchers will soon publish in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research the results of an experiment they did with 40 males in their twenties. Ten men in the control group did nothing for ten weeks; thirty men trained their biceps twice a week on a sitting curl machine.

    Fifteen of the thirty men trained their biceps with a weight at which they could make full reps [FULL]. The figure below shows what Full ROM means.

    The other fifteen men [PART] trained their biceps by doing only a Partial ROM. The men in the PART group trained with 10 kg heavier weights than the men in the FULL group did.



    At the end of the ten weeks the maximal strength of the FULL group had increased by 26 percent. The increase in the PART group was only 16 percent. The researchers could not detect an effect on muscle mass. There was no difference in the increase in muscle thickness [MT] between the two groups.





    The researchers speculate that if you train your muscles with full reps they 'recruit' more muscle fibres for this, and therefore the training effect is greater. Another possibility is that full reps lead to better circulation of blood in the muscle, and therefore also to a better supply of oxygen and nutrients.

    Source:
    J Strength Cond Res. 2011 Oct 24. [Epub ahead of print].
    This just proves that it is a science and compeltely different for the individulal. You can't just "workout" with your buddies and all lift the same weights. You have to find your own max and #s and workout from there.

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    This just makes me feel weak!

    Dude was ripped and strong.

    Lamar Gant (born 1957) is an American world record-holding powerlifter.[1] He was inducted into the International Powerlifting Federation Hall of Fame in 1980.[2]
    Gant set his first world record in 1974 by deadlifting 524.5 pounds (238 kg) at a bodyweight of 123 pounds (56 kg) at the Flint Olympian Games. In 1985, he became the first man to deadlift five times his own bodyweight, lifting 661 pounds (300 kg) at a bodyweight of 132 pounds (60 kg). For this, he has been included in the Guinness Book of Records. As of 2006, he holds the world records for deadlifting in both the 123- and 132-pound weight classes.[3] His best lifts at 123 pounds are 314 pounds (142 kg) RAW bench press and 638 pounds (289 kg) deadlift; at 132 pounds are 595 pounds (270 kg) squat 615 pounds (279 kg) (in training), 352.5 pounds (159.9 kg) RAW bench press, and 688 pounds (312 kg) deadlift.
    C'mon! At just 132 lbs. this guy is putting up 352 lbs. on the bench and 615 lbs. on the squat rack! WTF is he on?

    and the mofo had scoliosis!
    Last edited by OnPoint88; 12-08-2011 at 10:21 AM.
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    Just found my new role model, phuck gettin bigger, I'm gettin stronger!



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    Birds of a feather, flock together.

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    Really basic stuff and nothing new in that study.

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