Eating rice may raise arsenic levels

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    ADMINISTRATOR
    Prince's Avatar


    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Panama
    Posts
    63,896
    Rep Points
    2147483647

    Eating rice may raise arsenic levels

    Eating rice may raise arsenic levels
    (WebMD)

    On the heels of new revelations about arsenic in grape and apple juice, a new study shows that rice may be a significant source of arsenic in the diets of pregnant women.

    Exposure during pregnancy is a concern, experts say, because arsenic is able to cross the placenta and may harm a developing baby.

    For the study, researchers measured arsenic levels in the urine of 229 pregnant women in New Hampshire, a state where 40% of people get their water from wells. Well water sometimes has higher levels of arsenic than water from municipal systems, which must meet federal safety standards.

    Researchers checked the women's tap water for arsenic. They also asked the women to write down what food they had eaten in the three days before their urine tests.

    Even after accounting for arsenic in drinking water, researchers found that women who had recently eaten rice had slightly higher levels of inorganic arsenic -- the toxic form -- in their urine, compared to women who had not eaten rice.

    "Rice, which I think a lot of people would think of as very healthy, may be a real source of exposure to inorganic arsenic, above and beyond drinking-water arsenic," says Michael S. Bloom, PhD, an assistant professor at the University at Albany in New York.

    Bloom is studying the health effects of chronic arsenic exposure. He was not involved in the current research.

    For the average person, that means "you may be receiving an additional daily dose through rice. It adds to the cumulative burden of inorganic arsenic exposure," Bloom says.

    Researchers calculated that women who ate just a half cup of cooked rice each day -- the average amount eaten in the study -- would be getting just as much arsenic as if they drank a liter of tap water at EPA's maximum allowable limit for arsenic.

    In a statement, the USA Rice Federation says that comparison is misleading because it fails to recognize that the arsenic in water is all inorganic, the toxic form. Some of the arsenic found in rice is organic, a kind that is believed to be harmless.

    Each gram of rice the women ate was associated with a 1% increase in their arsenic levels. A gram of rice is about 48 grains.

    Chronic Arsenic Exposure and Health

    What does that mean for health? Researchers aren't sure.

    "Our study is really about exposure. We're not studying a health outcome. At least in this report," says Margaret R. Karagas, PhD, a professor of community and family medicine in epidemiology at Dartmouth Medical School in Lebanon, N.H.

    "Whether or not this is a health threat is a really big question," Bloom says.

    Studies have linked high arsenic levels in pregnant women to an increased risk of miscarriage. Exposure to arsenic in the womb has also been associated with lower birth weights in children and an increased risk of infant mortality.

    Most of those studies were in developing countries, however, where women had arsenic levels that were 50 to 200 times higher than those seen in this study.

    In fact, Bloom says, the levels of arsenic seen in the women in this study are on par with those found in the general U.S. population.

    "Obviously, people don't eat rice and drop dead the next day. You're looking at probably a chronic effect on health," says researcher Tracy Punshon, PhD, a research assistant professor in the department of biological sciences at Dartmouth College.

    Studies have shown, for example, that people with long-term exposure to arsenic have higher rates of skin, lung, and bladder cancers. Arsenic has also been linked to higher rates of cardiovascular disease.

    "Here in New Hampshire, where I live, we have natural arsenic in the ground water, and what you see in people who don't test their water and filter out their arsenic, that has translated into a higher-than-average risk of bladder cancer in this state," Punshon tells WebMD.

    She says much larger, longer studies will need to be done before the health effects are better understood.

    "We're frantically studying what this means," she says.

    In the meantime, experts say the findings will be most important to policy makers, who can take steps to help ensure public safety.

    "Our findings, along with those of other studies, highlight the need to regulate arsenic in food and in rice," Karagas says.

    Advice About Rice

    "We don't want to stop people from eating rice, because a rice-based, sort-of Asian diet is much better for your overall health than, say, eating McDonald's and fries every day," says Punshon, who has tested different varieties of rice for arsenic.

    She says people should be choosy about the kinds of rice they eat, though, and make sure it's not the only grain in their diet.

    Rice grown in the United States, for example, has been shown to have higher arsenic levels than jasmine or basmati rice grown in Thailand or India.

    Her studies have found that brown rice contains higher levels of arsenic than white rice, because arsenic concentrates in the outer layer of rice bran.

    "What really worries me is that the gluten-free movement is using a lot of rice, specifically brown rice," Punshon says. Brown rice turns up in a lot of products like cereal, rice syrup, baking mixes, and crackers.

    "If you replace all the grains in your diet with brown rice, you're putting yourself in a very unique exposure window," for arsenic, she says.

    Other experts agree that a balanced approach is key.

    "We don't want to scare people off rice," Punshon says. "It's still a healthy food."

    By Brenda Goodman, MA

    Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

    SOURCES:Gilbert-Diamond, D. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online Dec. 5, 2011.Michael S. Bloom, PhD, assistant professor, University at Albany.Margaret R. Karagas, PhD, professor, community and family medicine in epidemiology, Dartmouth Medical School in Lebanon.Tracy Punshon, PhD, research assistant professor, department of biological sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover.USA Rice Federation.


    IronMagLabs 15% Discount Code: Robert15






    IronMag Research 15% Discount Code: Robert15



  2. #2
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    72
    Rep Points
    1184660

    How did the arsenic get in the rice?

  3. #3
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    32
    Rep Points
    -4666

    anyone have cliffs of this read?

  4. #4

  5. #5
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    bogovinje
    Posts
    52
    Rep Points
    1808055

    Arsenic is a chemical element found in nature, symbolized by Ace This element is considered one of the most toxic existen.Existen three ways in which arsenic can be found, which are called allotropes. The first is its yellow cubic form, which is obtained from the condensation, at very low temperature, vapor. Second, is the black polymorphic, which is isostructural with black phosphorus. Finally, as metal, arsenic acts as a thermal and electrical conductive, however, is very fragile and has a very low ductility.

    As mentioned above, arsenic is found naturally on Earth. This mineral can be located as cobalt, or with other minerals such as sulfur or certain metals on the surface of the rocks.

    This element, high purity, has found many applications, however, between those who have found is its contribution to the manufacture of glass, its use as pigments in the fireworks.

    Arsenic is found to be highly toxic element, and humans can suffer serious consequences due to your contact through food, air and water, as well as through the skin.

    Among the foods that contain it are fish and seafood, however, arsenic is a bit dangerous to health. Contact with toxic arsenic may cause irritation of the stomach and intestines, as well as a decrease in the production of red and white cells. As contact with arsenic rises, increasing the chances of getting skin cancer, liver, lung, and also the lymph. Among other consequences, can lead to infertility and spontaneous abortions, heart problems etc

  6. #6
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    bogovinje
    Posts
    52
    Rep Points
    1808055

    10-year old girl suffering from arsenic poisoning


  7. #7
    Senior Member
    ELITE MEMBER
    dogsoldier's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    1,562
    Rep Points
    548246148

    The amount of arsenic found in Western food is pretty low. I saw several doctors being interviewed on the news about the arsenic scare. They all said that this is much to do about nothing. It is just food toxin celebrity dejure.

Similar Threads

  1. Does EQ raise Test Levels?
    By Jockstudfl10 in forum Anabolic Zone
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-12-2011, 05:49 PM
  2. When do c levels start to raise in pct?
    By Pika in forum Anabolic Zone
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-18-2011, 01:37 PM
  3. Inhaling dirty cat litter may raise your T levels
    By SFW in forum General Health & Awareness
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-10-2011, 10:31 AM
  4. Study: ZMA does not raise testosterone levels
    By Prince in forum Supplements
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-28-2011, 06:26 PM
  5. trying to raise nat test levels
    By jeremy1122k in forum Supplements
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-09-2002, 01:17 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
-->