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    Boehner: White House Should Support Jobs Bill







    Speaker of the House Rep. John Boehner is calling on the White House to support a jobs bill that the GOP says will help small businesses and create jobs. (March 8)

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    NFIB SMALL BUSINESS ECONOMIC TRENDS 2011
    www.nfib.com/Portals/0/PDF/sbet/sbet201104.pdf


    Summary

    OPTIMISM INDEX
    The Index of Small Business Optimism gave up 2.6 points in March,
    falling to 91.9. Four components rose or were unchanged, while six lost
    ground. The “hard” components of the Index (job creation, job openings,
    capital spending plans and inventory plans) added two points while the
    “soft” components (the other six in the table above) gave up 31 points.
    Index was driven by weaker expectations for real sales gains and business
    conditions and a marked deterioration in profit trends. The decline in the
    percent of owners expecting higher real sales and better business
    conditions in six months alone account for 76 percent of the decline in the
    Index.

    LABOR MARKETS

    Fifteen (15) percent, seasonally adjusted, reported unfilled job openings,
    unchanged from February. Over the next three months, 18 percent plan to
    increase employment (up 1 point), and 6 percent plan to reduce their
    workforce (unchanged), yielding a seasonally adjusted net 2 percent of
    owners planning to create new jobs, down 3 points from February, not
    great but still positive. This is historically low, especially for a recovery
    period. While these few new jobs are nudging the unemployment rate
    down, they do not make much of a dent in the pool of unemployed.

    CAPITAL SPENDING

    The frequency of reported capital outlays over the past six months rose 2
    points to 51 percent of all firms. But despite the improvement, this is still
    a “recession level”. Capital spending remains historically low in spite of
    very low interest rates and all sorts of expensing incentives. The problem is
    that “cheaper” equipment is still no bargain if you cannot use it. The
    percent of owners planning capital outlays in the future rose 2 points to 24
    percent, an improvement but still historically quite low. Money is cheap,
    but most owners are not interested in a loan to finance equipment they do
    not need. Prospects are still uncertain enough to discourage any but the
    most profitable and promising investments.

    INVENTORIES AND SALES
    The net percent of all owners (seasonally adjusted) reporting higher
    nominal sales over the past three months worsened by 1 point to a net
    negative 12 percent, 22 points better than the recession low reading in
    March 2009 (near the recession bottom), but still indicative of weak
    customer activity. The net percent of owners expecting higher real sales
    fell eight points to a net 6 percent of all owners (seasonally adjusted). This
    is bad news for hiring and inventory investment. Small business owners
    continued to liquidate inventories but at the lowest frequency in 35
    months. A net negative 7 percent of all owners reported growth in
    inventories (seasonally adjusted), a 1 point improvement.

    INFLATION
    In March, a net 9 percent reported raising average selling prices, a gain of
    33 percentage points from the low reading in 2009 and 20 points more than
    last September! Inflation is back on Main Street. In March, 24 percent
    planned hikes in average selling prices with many by 10 percent or more.
    A major force behind the price hikes is the elimination of inventory
    excesses which appeared in 2008 when consumers decided to raise their
    saving rate from 1 percent to about 6 percent, a reduction in consumption
    spending of about half a trillion dollars. The “fire sale” is over and profits
    are badly in need of some price support. Note that these hikes started
    before higher gas and energy prices became a real issue except for
    transportation firms and those with delivery services. Plans to raise prices
    rose 3 points to a net seasonally adjusted 24 percent of owners, the highest
    reading in 30 months. With an improving economy, more and more of
    these hikes will “stick”.

    PROFITS AND WAGES

    Reports of positive earnings trends deteriorated in March, registering a net
    negative 32 percent, 5 points worse than February. Seventeen (17) percent
    of the owners reported cutting prices, contributing to weaker earnings.
    Price cutting is evaporating. Large firms may be posting great profits, but
    the trend on Main Street is not supportive of solid hiring and capital
    spending. Costs for energy, materials and labor, and higher interest rates
    2 | NFIB Small Business Economic Trends Monthly Report
    are not the problem; these are yet to come. It is still weak sales. Seasonally
    adjusted, a net 7 percent reported raising worker compensation, down 1
    point. But reported gains in the first quarter are the strongest since the
    fourth quarter of 2008. A seasonally adjusted 9 percent plan to raise
    compensation, up 2 points and the highest reading since November 2008.

    CREDIT MARKETS

    Overall, 93 percent reported that all their credit needs were met or that they
    were not interested in borrowing. Seven percent reported that not all of
    their credit needs were satisfied, and 53 percent said they did not want a
    loan. Four percent reported financing as their #1 business problem.
    Twenty-five (25) percent of the owners reported that weak sales continued
    to be their top business problem (down 3 points), followed by 17 percent
    citing taxes and 17 percent government regulations and red tape. The
    historically high percent of owners who cite weak sales means that for
    many owners, investments in new equipment or new workers are not likely
    to “pay back”. This is a major cause of the lack of credit demand observed
    in financial markets along with the deficiency in housing starts, a million
    units below “normal”. Twenty-nine (29) percent of all owners reported
    borrowing on a regular basis, 1 point above the record low. A net 8 percent
    reported loans “harder to get” compared to their last attempt (asked of
    regular borrowers only), down 3 points. Credit availability is not holding
    back loan growth, it is a lack of demand.

    COMMENTARY

    Optimism faded, and is still at recession levels. Maybe it is a “new
    normal”. Maybe we will not see the surges we experienced at the start of a
    recovery. Times are different, government is a larger drag all the time. It
    wants more taxes and imposes more restrictions. New York has a new
    bureaucracy to help new restaurant owners get through the bureaucracy.
    How insane! Uncertainty is still huge and it clouds the future. Leadership
    does not do things that make sense to those who create jobs and wealth,
    only to those who take it. Inflation is coming back, a little too soon with so
    much slack in the economy. Although the rhetoric in Washington continues to suggest that a major reason for the slow recovery has been that banks will not lend to creditworthy borrowers, the evidence from the NFIB survey of hundreds of thousands of small firms suggests that this is not the case. The economy generated a lot of jobs by making bad loans (the housing bubble mess), and they are gone now. We could generate more jobs by making more bad loans, but the price paid will be even larger than this past recession. All
    through the “credit crisis”, the percent of small business owners
    complaining about financing problems stayed near 35 year low levels.

    Community banks across the country report that they have money to lend,
    but the pipeline of good applicants collapsed in the recession as the NFIB
    data show. Only a few firms complain that all their credit needs were not
    met. More than half do not even want a loan. The decline in house prices
    has indeed reduced the amount of home equity available to owners, but not
    below pre-2007 levels. As we learned, pre-recession real estate equity was
    not real, just as the equity in the dot.com bubble was not real and certainly
    could not be used as real “collateral”. The Federal Reserve has but one real
    policy tool – interest rates. But rates are not the only variable in the hiring
    and investment (real, not financial) equations. Relying on interest rate
    adjustments is akin to pushing on a string. The SBA and the Treasury can
    keep creating lending facilities of various types but that is not the problem
    and so far they have had little impact. Community banks are happy to
    engage in real banking and will make loans once businesses find a good
    reason to borrow.

    On the job side, it is going to take a rebound in consumer spending,
    particularly in the service sector to make a significant dent in the number
    of unemployed. The manufacturing sector is doing very well, but it does
    not create many jobs. Consumers continue to “de-leverage” so spending
    will recover slowly as they regain their financial footing. Unfortunately,
    the increase in energy costs will not help. Progress will be slow.
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    I don't give a rats ass what ()Boehner() ever says. Sorry but when a nobody congressman wonders around on the congressional floor handing out "campaign donation" checks to congressmen when congress is voting (at that very moment) on a bill that effects the writer of said checks, he no longer has my ear on anything.

    I see thats how or government works now though. Said nobody congressman is now speaker of the house. I thought he should have been sent to a nice prison cell but thats just me.



    I cannot be blamed for what I say. So don't listen to what I write because I am clearly

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    I have to find the link but it's basically a scale of corruption and governments and the US does not score very high. not for a country with "free markets"...

    the US economy is one of the most managed economy's in the OECD now and because of this small business can no longer compete with large firms. then on top of that add in stagnant wages for the majority of the US workforce and the effects of cumulative inflation of the USD over time.
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    I saw the job listings for Lake Mary a couple years ago. I wasn't interested in moving down there, certainly not for 60% of what these people were getting.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/02/bu...osts.html?_r=2

    Financial Giants Are Moving Jobs Off Wall Street

    By NELSON D. SCHWARTZ

    New York?s biggest investment houses are shifting jobs out of the area and expanding in cheaper locales in the United States, threatening the vast middle tier of positions that form the backbone of employment on Wall Street.
    The shift comes even as banks consider deeper staff cuts here, which could undermine the state and city tax base long term.

    ?Places like New York or London will remain financial centers, but most of the players are taking a much harder look and asking whether they can move large numbers of jobs,? said James Malick, a partner at the Boston Consulting Group who advises banks on relocation. In addition to higher taxes in the New York region, employers face real estate and labor costs significantly above the national average.

    Consultants say they have seen a sharp pickup in this trend, known as near-shoring, as opposed to offshoring overseas. Goldman Sachs, during a presentation to investors in late May, even boasted of the cost savings that relocating jobs can bring.
    ?Some functions need to stay in the United States, but they don?t need to be in New York City or near the client,? Mr. Malick said. And with most investment giants facing anemic revenue and more stringent regulation that cuts into trading revenues, relocation is more tempting than it was before the financial crisis.

    Low-level jobs have already migrated to call centers and back offices overseas, while top-end traders and bankers are secure in the New York area, experts say. Instead, services like accounting, trading and legal support, and human resources and compliance are being shifted to places like Salt Lake City, North Carolina and Jacksonville, Fla.

    Garry Douyon enjoyed his job helping process trades and working with clients and traders at RBS in Stamford, Conn., earning nearly $100,000 a year, but when the firm decided last fall to move his team to Salt Lake City with a salary of $60,000, he said he really didn?t have much of a choice.

    ?I didn?t even consider moving,? said Mr. Douyon, who founded a biofuels company, All-City Clean Energy, in Brooklyn with four partners. ?I liked RBS but I have my roots here, I have a home, I have kids in school.? A few members of his team decided to go, he added, but most chose to stay in the New York area.

    The potential shift has profound implications for New York?s tax base and economy because of Wall Street?s outsize financial profile. Last year, the industry contributed 14 percent of New York State?s tax revenue.

    After peaking at 213,000 in August 2007, securities industry jobs in the state fell more than 15 percent in the wake of the financial crisis, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Since then they have risen nearly 12,000, but at 191,200, employment is well below pre-crisis levels. By contrast, over the same period, Delaware gained 1,300 securities jobs while Arizona picked up 2,600.

    The federal government does not specifically track securities jobs in Utah, North Carolina or Florida, popular locations for near-shoring. But data from firms illustrates the trend.

    Since the end of 2009, Deutsche Bank?s work force in the New York area has fallen to 6,900 from 7,400 even as its staff in Jacksonville rose to 1,000 from 600. Credit Suisse?s staff in the New York region has dropped by 500 in the past four years, but the firm has added 450 positions in North Carolina?s Research Triangle, in the area of Raleigh, Cary, Durham and Chapel Hill. And last year, Bank of New York Mellon cut 350 jobs in New York City while hiring 150 people in Lake Mary, Fla.

    New York?s status as a financial capital is not likely to fade, and the state?s share of securities jobs in the United States has held steady at about 24 percent in recent years. ?Even as the securities industry goes through a difficult time, New York remains the financial capital of the world and I don?t see that changing anytime soon,? said Thomas P. DiNapoli, the New York State comptroller.

    But regional offices perform more and more of the sophisticated work usually associated with Wall Street and nearby trading hubs like Jersey City and Stamford. This parallels a shift in some technology jobs away from Silicon Valley to Portland, Ore., and cities in Texas, said Michael Shires, a professor at the School of Public Policy at Pepperdine, who prepares an annual ranking of the best cities for employment.

    ?I expect to see an acceleration,? he said, noting that while these middle-tier jobs may lack the salaries and glamour usually associated with Wall Street, ?these are the support people that actually make the stuff work.? What?s more, there are many more positions in the middle of the jobs pyramid at Wall Street firms than at the top.

    Deutsche Bank?s office in Jacksonville started out in 2008 as a back-office service center, according to bank officials. Since then, technology workers, legal and compliance staff members, and trading support jobs have been added. More recently, some traders who deal directly with clients are being located there. Lower costs and taxes are behind the moves, the officials said.

    J. Keith Crisco, the North Carolina secretary of commerce, visits New York three to five times a year, meeting with executives from firms already in North Carolina, like Credit Suisse, while reaching out to prospects. Another trip is planned this month.
    North Carolina provided Credit Suisse with roughly $14 million in incentives to bring it to the state.

    Delaware, which announced in April it had lured up to 1,200 JPMorgan Chase jobs to the state, is set to pay the giant bank $10.1 million in cash incentives. Alan Levin, director of the Delaware Economic Development Office, estimates the typical salary for those jobs at $78,000 a year.

    ?These jobs will be here for a long time,? he said. ?We want to create not just jobs but careers.?

    The erosion of middle-tier jobs in the financial sector is not limited to New York. In a presentation to analysts in late May, the president of Goldman Sachs, Gary Cohn, described what he called the firm?s ?high-value location strategy.? By looking outside hubs like New York, London, Tokyo and Hong Kong, he said, the firm could save 40 percent to 75 percent on job-related expenses.

    Over a third of Goldman hires in 2011 and 2012 have been in cities like Bangalore in India, Salt Lake City, Dallas and Singapore, Mr. Cohn said. Utah, with looser regulation and lower taxes than New York, has been a particular area of growth for Goldman.

    While Goldman?s work force in the New York area has been flat since the end of 2009 at just over 10,000, full-time employees in Salt Lake City have doubled to 1,400, making that office Goldman?s sixth-largest globally. In addition to its technology and operations staff, Goldman has expanded activities like research and investment management there.

    These days, Mr. Douyon is building a refinery at the Brooklyn Navy Yard that aims to make biodiesel from waste products like vegetable oil and grease from restaurants. While he says it is a more flexible way of life and, he hopes, more lucrative, he still feels the tug of the trading floor.

    ?To be honest, I miss working on Wall Street,? he said.
    Jessica Silver-Greenberg contributed reporting.

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    after this last intentional recession finance has wiped out the working class. now even those on Wallstreet have to cut costs via wages to funnel more money up to the top..you can't get blood from a stone and the workers have no more to give...
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    Jobs Bill?

    What a laugh.


    For the last 7 decades the US govt and businesses have been dismantling the middle class with public and intentional economic policies.

    Now we are living with the result.

    And they even dare to call it a....."jobs bill?"
    It's an accurate statement that our current spending will not be increasing the debt We've stopped spending money that we don't have.

    -- Jack Lew, then director of the Office of Management and Budget, in Feb. 16, 2011 testimony before the Senate Budget Committee.

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    I have a good jobs bill, throw out all illegal aliens and put the 1st Marine Division on the border with Latin America, there would be plenty of jobs

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    I wonder what poison legislation Boner and his crew added to the "jobs" bill.
    If gunners were as violent as anti-gunners believe, logically there wouldn't be any anti-gunners left.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaphod View Post
    I wonder what poison legislation Boner and his crew added to the "jobs" bill.
    Ain't that the truth, they are amazing if they have a transportation bill, they will sneak something into it that has nothing to do with transportation

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    Quote Originally Posted by ctr10 View Post
    I have a good jobs bill, throw out all illegal aliens and put the 1st Marine Division on the border with Latin America, there would be plenty of jobs
    while illegal immigration is a problem minimum wage jobs aren't going to help the US economy, they are part of the problem. the jobs in the service sector are paying between $8-$14/hr for non-shift supervisors, etc. once adjusted for inflation your talking about $2.25-$5/hr in 1980's dollars...you can't consume on those wages only provide the basic necessities which doesn't really help the economy...there are far too many Americans today living on poverty wages, we need much more than the bare minimum.
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    Despite Layoffs, Credit Suisse, DB & Morgan are Still Hiring | Welcome to StreetID News

    Despite Layoffs, Credit Suisse, DB & Morgan are Still Hiring

    Posted on July 30, 2012 by StreetID

    Following a report from The Wall Street Journal that discussed the next round of layoffs from Wall Street?s largest banks, FINS added to the depressing news with its own depressing story.
    ?The fallout isn?t limited to American banks,? FINS wrote. ?Both Credit Suisse and Deutsche Bank will be bringing out the ax.?

    It is true that the world?s largest banks have reduced their workforce (or will do so in the near future) by a significant number of employees. But while it is easy to report on corporations like JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America, it is much more difficult to talk about a company like Motif Investing, a new financial startup in Silicon Valley that is hiring. Motif Investing is new, so it is not yet a household name. Thus, it does not command the same attention-grabbing headline clout as Morgan Stanley.

    But there are companies all over the financial sector that are hiring, and not just high-level executives. In June, StreetID profiled some of the lesser-known areas of financial job growth.

    Why aren?t these companies and hiring opportunities being promoted on, say, The Wall Street Journal? Once again, it all comes down to who?s doing the hiring and who?s doing the firing. It is a lot easier to say that Bank of America is reducing its workforce than it is to say that there are dozens or hundreds of financial boutiques and startups hiring thousands of new employees.

    And here?s a little tidbit that everyone in the media seems to overlook: while the biggest banks are laying off some employees, they are also hiring! Credit Suisse is looking for private bankers, investment bankers, and asset managers, among others. Deutsche Bank is hiring as well. Even Morgan Stanley is searching for new talent!

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/31/bu...it_th_20120831

    Majority of New Jobs Pay Low Wages, Study Finds

    By CATHERINE RAMPELL

    While a majority of jobs lost during the downturn were in the middle range of wages, a majority of those added during the recovery have been low paying, according to a new report from the National Employment Law Project.
    The disappearance of midwage, midskill jobs is part of a longer-term trend that some refer to as a hollowing out of the work force, though it has probably been accelerated by government layoffs.

    ?The overarching message here is we don?t just have a jobs deficit; we have a ?good jobs? deficit,? said Annette Bernhardt, the report?s author and a policy co-director at the National Employment Law Project, a liberal research and advocacy group.
    The report looked at 366 occupations tracked by the Labor Department and clumped them into three equal groups by wage, with each representing a third of American employment in 2008. The middle third ? occupations in fields like construction, manufacturing and information, with median hourly wages of $13.84 to $21.13 ? accounted for 60 percent of job losses from the beginning of 2008 to early 2010.

    The job market has turned around since then, but those fields have represented only 22 percent of total job growth. Higher-wage occupations ? those with a median wage of $21.14 to $54.55 ? represented 19 percent of job losses when employment was falling, and 20 percent of job gains when employment began growing again.

    Lower-wage occupations, with median hourly wages of $7.69 to $13.83, accounted for 21 percent of job losses during the retraction. Since employment started expanding, they have accounted for 58 percent of all job growth.
    The occupations with the fastest growth were retail sales (at a median wage of $10.97 an hour) and food preparation workers ($9.04 an hour). Each category has grown by more than 300,000 workers since June 2009.

    Some of these new, lower-paying jobs are being taken by people just entering the labor force, like recent high school and college graduates. Many, though, are being filled by older workers who lost more lucrative jobs in the recession and were forced to take something to scrape by.

    ?I think I?ve been very resilient and resistant and optimistic, up until very recently,? said Ellen Pinney, 56, who was dismissed from a $75,000-a-year job in which she managed procurement and supply for an electronics company in March 2008.
    Since then, she has cobbled together a series of temporary jobs in retail and home health care and worked as a part-time receptionist for a beauty salon. She is now working as an unpaid intern for a construction company, putting together bids and business plans for green energy projects, and has moved in with her 86-year-old father in Forked River, N.J.

    ?I really can?t bear it anymore,? she said, noting that her applications to places like PetSmart and Target had gone unanswered. ?From every standpoint ? my independence, my sense of purposefulness, my self-esteem, my life planning ? this is just not what I was planning.?

    As Ms. Pinney?s experience shows, low-wage jobs have not been growing especially quickly in this recovery; they account for such a big share of job growth mostly because midwage job growth has been so slow.
    Over the last few decades, the number of midwage, midskill jobs has stagnated or declined as employers chose to automate routine tasks or to move them offshore.

    Job growth has been concentrated in positions that tend to fall into two categories: manual work that must be done in person, like styling hair or serving food, which usually pays relatively little; and more creative, design-oriented work like engineering or surgery, which often pays quite well.

    Since 2001, employment has grown 8.7 percent in lower-wage occupations and 6.6 percent in high-wage ones. Over that period, midwage occupation employment has fallen by 7.3 percent.

    This ?polarization? of skills and wages has been documented meticulously by David H. Autor, an economics professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A recent study found that this polarization accelerated in the last three recessions, particularly the last one, as financial pressures forced companies to reorganize more quickly.

    ?This is not just a nice, smooth process,? said Henry E. Siu, an economics professor at the University of British Columbia, who helped write the recent study about polarization and the business cycle. ?A lot of these jobs were suddenly wiped out during recession and are not coming back.?

    On top of private sector revamps, state and local governments have been shedding workers in recent years. Those jobs lost in the public sector have been primarily in mid and higher-wage positions, according to Ms. Bernhardt?s analysis.

    ?Whenever you look at data like these, there is this tendency to get overwhelmed, that there are these inevitable, big macro forces causing this polarization and we can?t do anything about them. In fact, we can,? Ms. Bernhardt said. She called for more funds for states to stem losses in the public sector and federal infrastructure projects to employ idled construction workers. Both proposals have faced resistance from Republicans in Congress.

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    being the worst recovery since the great depression, it's no surprise.
    -S-

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swiper View Post
    being the worst recovery since the great depression, it's no surprise.
    and why exactly has it been the worst recovery?
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAM View Post
    and why exactly has it been the worst recovery?

    The Worst Economic Recovery Since The Great Depression - Forbes
    -S-

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    spoke to a woman today who used to get 13 something an hour for a job being done in india now for a dollar fifteen and hour. they sent her job there then had the audacity to ask her to go there and train people.

    you don't get what you wish for ~ you get what you work for

    ...






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    I know exactly why, I was asking if you knew...

    Peter Ferrara is a joke, another supply-sider that doesn't believe in cause & effect..it's pure insanity
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Wing View Post
    spoke to a woman today who used to get 13 something an hour for a job being done in india now for a dollar fifteen and hour. they sent her job there then had the audacity to ask her to go there and train people.
    that happened to US at Agilent when they outsourced all of our work to India. some of the guys went there to train people. I wanted no parts of it, I can't take the way they treat women over there.
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    don't blame you. she worked her job 16 years before that happened and talking about she just looked defeated.

    you don't get what you wish for ~ you get what you work for

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    Boehner should quit being a boner and do something fucking constructive. That fucking cry baby. He needs to man the fuck up and represent the people who voted for him rather than represent the lobbyists and campaign donors.
    If gunners were as violent as anti-gunners believe, logically there wouldn't be any anti-gunners left.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregzs View Post
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/31/bu...it_th_20120831

    Majority of New Jobs Pay Low Wages, Study Finds

    By CATHERINE RAMPELL

    While a majority of jobs lost during the downturn were in the middle range of wages, a majority of those added during the recovery have been low paying, according to a new report from the National Employment Law Project.
    The disappearance of midwage, midskill jobs is part of a longer-term trend that some refer to as a hollowing out of the work force, though it has probably been accelerated by government layoffs.

    ?The overarching message here is we don?t just have a jobs deficit; we have a ?good jobs? deficit,? said Annette Bernhardt, the report?s author and a policy co-director at the National Employment Law Project, a liberal research and advocacy group.
    The report looked at 366 occupations tracked by the Labor Department and clumped them into three equal groups by wage, with each representing a third of American employment in 2008. The middle third ? occupations in fields like construction, manufacturing and information, with median hourly wages of $13.84 to $21.13 ? accounted for 60 percent of job losses from the beginning of 2008 to early 2010.

    The job market has turned around since then, but those fields have represented only 22 percent of total job growth. Higher-wage occupations ? those with a median wage of $21.14 to $54.55 ? represented 19 percent of job losses when employment was falling, and 20 percent of job gains when employment began growing again.

    Lower-wage occupations, with median hourly wages of $7.69 to $13.83, accounted for 21 percent of job losses during the retraction. Since employment started expanding, they have accounted for 58 percent of all job growth.
    The occupations with the fastest growth were retail sales (at a median wage of $10.97 an hour) and food preparation workers ($9.04 an hour). Each category has grown by more than 300,000 workers since June 2009.

    Some of these new, lower-paying jobs are being taken by people just entering the labor force, like recent high school and college graduates. Many, though, are being filled by older workers who lost more lucrative jobs in the recession and were forced to take something to scrape by.

    ?I think I?ve been very resilient and resistant and optimistic, up until very recently,? said Ellen Pinney, 56, who was dismissed from a $75,000-a-year job in which she managed procurement and supply for an electronics company in March 2008.
    Since then, she has cobbled together a series of temporary jobs in retail and home health care and worked as a part-time receptionist for a beauty salon. She is now working as an unpaid intern for a construction company, putting together bids and business plans for green energy projects, and has moved in with her 86-year-old father in Forked River, N.J.

    ?I really can?t bear it anymore,? she said, noting that her applications to places like PetSmart and Target had gone unanswered. ?From every standpoint ? my independence, my sense of purposefulness, my self-esteem, my life planning ? this is just not what I was planning.?

    As Ms. Pinney?s experience shows, low-wage jobs have not been growing especially quickly in this recovery; they account for such a big share of job growth mostly because midwage job growth has been so slow.
    Over the last few decades, the number of midwage, midskill jobs has stagnated or declined as employers chose to automate routine tasks or to move them offshore.

    Job growth has been concentrated in positions that tend to fall into two categories: manual work that must be done in person, like styling hair or serving food, which usually pays relatively little; and more creative, design-oriented work like engineering or surgery, which often pays quite well.

    Since 2001, employment has grown 8.7 percent in lower-wage occupations and 6.6 percent in high-wage ones. Over that period, midwage occupation employment has fallen by 7.3 percent.

    This ?polarization? of skills and wages has been documented meticulously by David H. Autor, an economics professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A recent study found that this polarization accelerated in the last three recessions, particularly the last one, as financial pressures forced companies to reorganize more quickly.

    ?This is not just a nice, smooth process,? said Henry E. Siu, an economics professor at the University of British Columbia, who helped write the recent study about polarization and the business cycle. ?A lot of these jobs were suddenly wiped out during recession and are not coming back.?

    On top of private sector revamps, state and local governments have been shedding workers in recent years. Those jobs lost in the public sector have been primarily in mid and higher-wage positions, according to Ms. Bernhardt?s analysis.

    ?Whenever you look at data like these, there is this tendency to get overwhelmed, that there are these inevitable, big macro forces causing this polarization and we can?t do anything about them. In fact, we can,? Ms. Bernhardt said. She called for more funds for states to stem losses in the public sector and federal infrastructure projects to employ idled construction workers. Both proposals have faced resistance from Republicans in Congress.
    It must be all of those burdensome regulations that are preventing the job creators from paying people what they used to. Regulations like...*chirp chirp*...*chirp chirp* Or maybe it's the uncertainty in the tax code. You know, because once the tax code gets set it never gets changed again.
    If sense were common, everyone would have it.

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    Boehner: White House Should Support Jobs Bill

    The government should not be involved in anything. Let the free market do its thing and it will prosper like it always has.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale Mabry View Post
    It must be all of those burdensome regulations that are preventing the job creators from paying people what they used to. Regulations like...*chirp chirp*...*chirp chirp* Or maybe it's the uncertainty in the tax code. You know, because once the tax code gets set it never gets changed again.
    the sad thing is that there are many that actually believe that crap. they should really familiarize themselves with the working conditions in the US when there were no regulations or unions.

    take Apple as an example roughly 50% of their manpower and labor is supplied by Foxconn in the CPR. there is roughly the same amount of high skilled and low skilled workers in their respective areas in each country. the wage bill for the US is about 725m and only 25m in China. that along with all of the ways of legal tax avoidance is how company's like Apple become so profitable. it may be a quality product but in the long run it's still just a phone or computer, etc.
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BBPowder View Post
    The government should not be involved in anything. Let the free market do its thing and it will prosper like it always has.
    you mean the free markets that ended in the world in the 1800's? there isn't a single country in the world that operates on free market principles.
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAM View Post
    you mean the free markets that ended in the world in the 1800's? there isn't a single country in the world that operates on free market principles.
    There are no true free markets left. But there still a few places left that have more market freedom than us and do much better.


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    Quote Originally Posted by BBPowder View Post
    There are no true free markets left. But there still a few places left that have more market freedom than us and do much better.
    Name one
    If gunners were as violent as anti-gunners believe, logically there wouldn't be any anti-gunners left.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaphod View Post
    Name one
    it used to be the internet until govt stuck their noses in it.
    -S-

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    Quote Originally Posted by Swiper View Post
    it used to be the internet until govt stuck their noses in it.
    DOD DARPA created the underlying network principles for the Internet which was ARPANet along with gov creating the first general purpose computer which was ENIAC in '46.

    while not a fan of the current system of cronyism capitalism practiced in the US I'm also not a fan of those that create a non-factual interpretation of history strictly to suit and further their ideology.
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAM View Post
    DOD DARPA created the underlying network principles for the Internet which was ARPANet along with gov creating the first general purpose computer which was ENIAC in '46.

    while not a fan of the current system of cronyism capitalism practiced in the US I'm also not a fan of those that create a non-factual interpretation of history strictly to suit and further their ideology.
    free market as in limited regulations, is what I was referring to.
    -S-

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