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    'Predator' actor Sonny Landham dead at 76

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/news...cid=spartandhp

    NEW YORK ? Sonny Landham, the muscular action-movie actor who co-starred in "Predator" and "48 Hrs," has died. He was 76.

    Landham's sister, Dawn Boehler, said the actor died from congestive heart failure Thursday at a Lexington, Kentucky, hospital. Landham was a brawny, deep-voiced actor and stunt man who played a bit part in Walter Hill's 1979 street-gang thriller "The Warriors" before the director cast him as the trigger-happy criminal Billy Bear in 1982's "48 Hrs."

    Landham, who was part Cherokee and Seminole, was perhaps most known for playing the Native American tracker Billy Sole in the 1987 Arnold Schwarzenegger film "Predator."

    Landham entered the movie business after working in pornography in the '70s. Later in life, he attempted brief and unsuccessful political campaigns.

    He's survived by his son, William, and daughter, Priscilla.

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    Jerry Lewis, Mercurial Comedian and Filmmaker, Dies at 91

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/news...cid=spartandhp

    Jerry Lewis, the comedian and filmmaker who was adored by many, disdained by others, but unquestionably a defining figure of American entertainment in the 20th century, died on Sunday morning at his home in Las Vegas. He was 91.

    His death was confirmed by John Katsilometes, a columnist for The Las Vegas Review Journal, who spoke to family members.

    Mr. Lewis knew success in movies, on television, in nightclubs, on the Broadway stage and in the university lecture hall. His career had its ups and downs, but when it was at its zenith there were few stars any bigger. And he got there remarkably quickly.

    Barely out of his teens, he shot to fame shortly after World War II with a nightclub act in which the rakish, imperturbable Dean Martin crooned and the skinny, hyperactive Mr. Lewis capered around the stage, a dangerously volatile id to Mr. Martin?s supremely relaxed ego.

    After his break with Mr. Martin in 1956, Mr. Lewis went on to a successful solo career, eventually writing, producing and directing many of his own films.

    As a spokesman for the Muscular Dystrophy Association, Mr. Lewis raised vast sums for charity; as a filmmaker of great personal force and technical skill, he made many contributions to the industry, including the invention in 1960 of a device ? the video assist, which allowed directors to review their work immediately on the set ? still in common use.

    A mercurial personality who could flip from naked neediness to towering rage, Mr. Lewis seemed to contain multitudes, and he explored all of them. His ultimate object of contemplation was his own contradictory self, and he turned his obsession with fragmentation, discontinuity and the limits of language into a spectacle that enchanted children, disturbed adults and fascinated postmodernist critics.

    Jerry Lewis was born on March 16, 1926, in Newark. Most sources, including his 1982 autobiography, ?Jerry Lewis: In Person,? give his birth name as Joseph Levitch. But Shawn Levy, author of the exhaustive 1996 biography ?King of Comedy: The Life and Art of Jerry Lewis,? unearthed a birth record that gave his first name as Jerome.

    His parents, Danny and Rae Levitch, were entertainers ? his father a song-and-dance man, his mother a pianist ? who used the name Lewis when they appeared in small-time vaudeville and at Catskills resort hotels. The Levitches were frequently on the road and often left Joey, as he was called, in the care of Rae?s mother and her sisters. The experience of being passed from home to home left Mr. Lewis with an enduring sense of insecurity and, as he observed, a desperate need for attention and affection.

    An often bored student at Union Avenue School in Irvington, N.J., he began organizing amateur shows with and for his classmates, while yearning to join his parents on tour. During the winter of 1938-39, his father landed an extended engagement at the Hotel Arthur in Lakewood, N.J., and Joey was allowed to go along. Working with the daughter of the hotel?s owners, he created a comedy act in which they lip-synced to popular recordings.

    By his 16th birthday, Joey had dropped out of Irvington High and was aggressively looking for work, having adopted the professional name Jerry Lewis to avoid confusion with the nightclub comic Joe E. Lewis. He performed his ?record act? solo between features at movie theaters in northern New Jersey, and soon moved on to burlesque and vaudeville.

    In 1944 ? a 4F classification kept him out of the war ? he was performing at the Downtown Theater in Detroit when he met Patti Palmer, a 23-year-old singer. Three months later they were married, and on July 31, 1945, while Patti was living with Jerry?s parents in Newark and he was performing at a Baltimore nightclub, she gave birth to the first of the couple?s six sons, Gary, who in the 1960s had a series of hit records with his band Gary Lewis and the Playboys. The couple divorced in 1980.

    Between his first date with Ms. Palmer and the birth of his first son, Mr. Lewis had met Dean Martin, a promising young crooner from Steubenville, Ohio. Appearing on the same bill at the Glass Hat nightclub in Manhattan, the skinny kid from New Jersey was dazzled by the sleepy-eyed singer, who seemed to be everything he was not: handsome, self-assured and deeply, unshakably cool.

    When they found themselves on the same bill again at another Manhattan nightclub, the Havana-Madrid, in March 1946, they started fooling around in impromptu sessions after the evening?s last show. Their antics earned the notice of Billboard magazine, whose reviewer wrote, ?Martin and Lewis do an afterpiece that has all the makings of a sock act,? using showbiz slang for a successful show.

    Mr. Lewis must have remembered those words when he was booked that summer at the 500 Club in Atlantic City. When the singer on the program dropped out, he pushed the club?s owner to hire Mr. Martin to fill the spot. Mr. Lewis and Mr. Martin cobbled together a routine based on their after-hours high jinks at the Havana-Madrid, with Mr. Lewis as a bumbling busboy who kept breaking in on Mr. Martin ? dropping trays, hurling food, cavorting like a monkey ? without ever ruffling the singer?s sang-froid.

    The act was a success. Before the week?s end, they were drawing crowds and winning mentions from Broadway columnists. That September, they returned to the Havana-Madrid in triumph.

    Bookings at bigger and better clubs in New York and Chicago followed, and by the summer of 1948 they had reached the pinnacle, headlining at the Copacabana on the Upper East Side of Manhattan while playing one show a night at the 6,000-seat Roxy Theater in Times Square.

    The phenomenal rise of Martin and Lewis was like nothing show business had seen before. Partly this was because of the rise of mass media after the war, when newspapers, radio and the emerging medium of television came together to create a new kind of instant celebrity. And partly it was because four years of war and its difficult aftermath were finally lifting, allowing America to indulge a long-suppressed taste for silliness. But primarily it was the unusual chemical reaction that occurred when Martin and Lewis were side by side.

    Mr. Lewis?s shorthand definition for their relationship was ?sex and slapstick.? But much more was going on: a dialectic between adult and infant, assurance and anxiety, bitter experience and wide-eyed innocence that generated a powerful image of postwar America, a gangly young country suddenly dominant on the world stage.

    Among the audience members at the Copacabana was the producer Hal Wallis, who had a distribution deal through Paramount Pictures. Other studios were interested ? more so after Martin and Lewis began appearing on live television ? but it was Mr. Wallis who signed them to a five-year contract.

    He started them off slowly, slipping them into a low-budget project already in the pipeline. Based on a popular radio show, ?My Friend Irma? (1949) starred Marie Wilson as a ditsy blonde and Diana Lynn as her levelheaded roommate, with Martin and Lewis providing comic support. The film did well enough to generate a sequel, ?My Friend Irma Goes West? (1950), but it was not until ?At War With the Army? (1951), an independent production filmed outside Mr. Wallis?s control, that the team took center stage.

    ?At War With the Army? codified the relationship that ran through all 13 subsequent Martin and Lewis films, positing the pair as unlikely pals whose friendship might be tested by trouble with money or women (usually generated by Mr. Martin?s character), but who were there for each other in the end.

    The films were phenomenally successful, and their budgets quickly grew. Some were remakes of Paramount properties ? Bob Hope?s 1940 hit ?The Ghost Breakers,? for example, became ?Scared Stiff? (1953) ? while other projects were more adventurous.

    ?That?s My Boy? (1951), ?The Stooge? (1953) and ?The Caddy? (1953) approached psychological drama with their forbidding father figures and suggestions of sibling rivalry; Mr. Lewis had a hand in the writing of each. ?Artists and Models? (1955) and ?Hollywood or Bust? (1956) were broadly satirical looks at American popular culture under the authorial hand of the director Frank Tashlin, who brought a bold graphic style and a flair for wild sight gags to his work. For Mr. Tashlin, Mr. Lewis became a live-action extension of the anarchic characters, like Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck, he had worked with as a director of Warner Bros. cartoons.

    Mr. Tashlin also functioned as a mentor to Mr. Lewis, who was fascinated with the technical side of filmmaking. Mr. Lewis made 16-millimeter sound home movies and by 1949 was enlisting celebrity friends for short comedies with titles like ?How to Smuggle a Hernia Across the Border.? These were amateur efforts, but Mr. Lewis was soon confident enough to advise veteran directors like George Marshall (?Money From Home?) and Norman Taurog (?Living It Up?) on questions of staging. With Mr. Tashlin, he found a director both sympathetic to his style of comedy and technically adept.

    But as his artistic aspirations grew and his control over the films in which he appeared increased, Mr. Lewis?s relationship with Mr. Martin became strained. As wildly popular as the team remained, Mr. Martin had come to resent Mr. Lewis?s dominant role in shaping their work and spoke of reviving his solo career as a singer. Mr. Lewis felt betrayed by the man he still worshiped as a role model, and by the time filming began on ?Hollywood or Bust? they were barely speaking.

    After a farewell performance at the Copacabana on July 25, 1956, 10 years to the day after they had first appeared together in Atlantic City, Mr. Martin and Mr. Lewis went their separate ways.

    For Mr. Lewis, an unexpected success mitigated the trauma of the breakup. His recording of ?Rock-a-Bye Your Baby With a Dixie Me
    lody,? belted in a style that suggested Al Jolson, became a Top 10 hit, and the album on which it appeared, ?Jerry Lewis Just Sings,? climbed to No. 3 on the Billboard chart, outselling anything his former partner had released.
    Reassured that his public still loved him, Mr. Lewis returned to filmmaking with the low-budget, semidramatic ?The Delicate Delinquent? and then shifted into overdrive for a series of personal appearances, beginning at the Sands in Las Vegas and culminating with a four-week engagement at the Palace in New York. He signed a contract with NBC for a series of specials and renewed his relationship with the Muscular Dystrophy Association ? a charity that he and Mr. Martin had long supported ? by hosting a 19-hour telethon.

    Mr. Lewis made three uninspired films to complete his obligation to Hal Wallis. He saved his creative energies for the films he produced himself. The first three of those films ? ?Rock-a-Bye Baby? (1958), ?The Geisha Boy? (1958) and ?Cinderfella? (1960) ? were directed by Mr. Tashlin. After that, finally ready to assume complete control, Mr. Lewis persuaded Paramount to take a chance on ?The Bellboy? (1960), a virtually plotless hommage to silent-film comedy that he wrote, directed and starred in, playing a hapless employee of the Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami Beach.

    It was the beginning of Mr. Lewis?s most creative period. During the next five years, he directed five more films of remarkable stylistic assurance, including ?The Ladies Man? (1961), with its huge multistory set of a women?s boardinghouse, and, most notably, ?The Nutty Professor? (1963), a variation on ?Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,? in which Mr. Lewis appeared as a painfully shy chemistry professor and his dark alter ego, a swaggering nightclub singer.
    With their themes of fragmented identity and their experimental approach to sound, color and narrative structure, Mr. Lewis?s films began to attract the serious consideration of iconoclastic young critics in France. At a time when American film was still largely dismissed by American critics as purely commercial and devoid of artistic interest, Mr. Lewis?s work was held up as a prime example of a personal filmmaker functioning happily within the studio system.

    ?The Nutty Professor,? a study in split personality that is as disturbing as it is hilarious, is probably the most honored and analyzed of Mr. Lewis?s films. (It was also his personal favorite.) For some critics, the opposition between the helpless, infantile Professor Julius Kelp and the coldly manipulative lounge singer Buddy Love represented a spiteful revision of the old Martin-and-Lewis dynamic. But Buddy seems more pertinently a projection of Mr. Lewis?s darkest fears about himself: a version of the distant, unloving father whom Mr. Lewis had never managed to please as a child, and whom he both despised and desperately wanted to be.

    ?The Nutty Professor? transcends mere pathology by placing that division within the cultural context of the Kennedy-Hefner-Sinatra era. Buddy Love was what the midcentury American male dreamed of becoming; Julius Kelp was what, deep inside, he suspected he actually was.

    ?The Nutty Professor? was a hit. But the studio era was coming to an end, Mr. Lewis?s audience was growing old, and by the time he and Paramount parted ways in 1965 his career was in crisis. He tried casting himself in more mature, sophisticated roles ? for example, as a prosperous commercial artist in ?Three on a Couch,? which he directed for Columbia in 1966. But the public was unconvinced.

    He seemed more himself in the multi-role chase comedy ?The Big Mouth? (1967) and the World War II farce ?Which Way to the Front?? (1970). But his blend of physical comedy and pathos was quickly going out of style in a Hollywood defined by the countercultural irony of ?The Graduate? and ?MASH.? After ?The Day the Clown Cried,? his audacious attempt to direct a comedy-drama set in a Nazi concentration amp, collapsed in litigation in 1972, Mr. Lewis was absent from films for eight years. In that dark period, he struggled with an addiction to the pain killer Percodan.

    ?Hardly Working,? an independent production that Mr. Lewis directed in Florida, was released in Europe in 1980 and in the United States in 1981. It referred to Mr. Lewis?s marginalized position by casting him as an unemployed circus clown who finds fulfillment in a mundane job with the post office. For Roger Ebert, writing in The Chicago Sun-Times, ?Hardly Working? was ?one of the worst movies ever to achieve commercial release in this country,? but the film found moderate success in the United States and Europe and has since earned passionate defenders.

    A follow-up in 1983, ?Smorgasbord? (also known as ?Cracking Up?), proved a misfire, and Mr. Lewis never directed another feature film. He did, however, enjoy a revival as an actor, thanks largely to his powerful performance in a dramatic role in Martin Scorsese?s ?The King of Comedy? (1982) as a talk-show host kidnapped by an aspiring comedian (Robert De Niro) desperate to become a celebrity. He appeared in the television series ?Wiseguy? in 1988 and 1989 as a garment manufacturer threatened by the mob, and was memorable in character roles in Emir Kusturica?s ?Arizona Dream? (1993) and Peter Chelsom?s ?Funny Bones? (1995). Mr. Lewis played Mr. Applegate (a.k.a. the Devil) in a Broadway revival of the musical ?Damn Yankees? in 1995 and later took the show on an international tour.

    Although he retained a preternaturally youthful appearance for many years, Mr. Lewis had a series of serious illnesses in his later life, including prostate cancer, pulmonary fibrosis and two heart attacks. Drug treatments caused his weight to balloon alarmingly, though he recovered enough to continue performing well into the new millennium. He was appearing in one-man shows as recently as 2016.

    Through it all, Mr. Lewis continued his charity work, serving as national chairman of the Muscular Dystrophy Association and, beginning in 1966, hosting the association?s annual Labor Day weekend telethon. Although some advocates for the rights of the disabled criticized the association?s ?Jerry?s Kids? campaign as condescending, the telethon raised about $2 billion during the more than 40 years he was host.

    For reasons that remain largely unexplained but were apparently related to a disagreement with the association?s president, Gerald C. Weinberg, the 2010 telethon was Mr. Lewis?s last ? he had been scheduled to make an appearance on the 2011 telethon but did not ? and he had no further involvement with the charity until 2016, when he lent his support via a promotional video. (The telethon was shortened and eventually discontinued.)

    During the 1976 telethon, Frank Sinatra staged an on-air reunion between Mr. Lewis and Mr. Martin, to the visible discomfort of both men. A more lasting reconciliation came in 1987, when Mr. Lewis attended the funeral of Mr. Martin?s oldest son, Dean Paul Martin Jr., a pilot in the California Air National Guard who had been killed in a crash. They continued to speak occasionally until Mr. Martin died in 1995.

    In 2005, Mr. Lewis collaborated with James Kaplan on ?Dean and Me (A Love Story),? a fond memoir of his years with Mr. Martin in which he placed most of the blame for their breakup on himself. Among Mr. Lewis?s other books was ?The Total Film-Maker,? a compendium of his lectures at the film school of the University of Southern California, where he taught, beginning in 1967.

    In 1983, Mr. Lewis married SanDee Pitnick, and in 1992 their daughter, Danielle Sara, was born.

    Although the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences never honored Mr. Lewis for his film work, he received the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for his charitable activity in 2009. His many other honors included two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame ? one for his movie work, the other for television ? and an induction into the L?gion d?Honneur, awarded by the French government in 2006.

    In 2015, the Library of Congress announced that it had acquired Mr. Lewis?s personal archives. In a statement, he said, ?Knowing that the Library of Congress was interested in acquiring my life?s work was one of the biggest thrills of my life.?

    Mr. Lewis was officially recognized as a ?towering figure in cinema? at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival. The festival?s tribute to him included the screening of a preliminary cut of ?Max Rose,? Mr. Lewis?s first movie in almost 20 years, in which he starred as a recently widowed jazz pianist in search of answers about his past. The film did not have its United States premiere until 2016, when it was shown as part of a Lewis tribute at the Museum of Modern Art. Also in 2016, he appeared briefly as the father of Nicolas Cage?s character in the crime drama ?The Trust.?

    In 2012, Mr. Lewis directed a stage musical in Nashville based on ?The Nutty Professor.? The show, with a score by Marvin Hamlisch and book and lyrics by Rupert Holmes, never made it to Broadway, but Mr. Lewis relished the challenge of directing for the stage, a first for him.

    ?There?s something about the risk, the courage that it takes to face the risk,? he told The New York Times. ?I?m not going to get greatness unless I have to go at it with fear and uncertainty.??

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    Richard Anderson Dies: Oscar Goldman From ?Six Million Dollar Man? Was 91

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/news/ric...OZC?li=BBmkt5R

    Richard Anderson, the Emmy-nominated actor who played Oscar Goldman in both hit 1970s series The Six Million Dollar Man and The Bionic Woman, died August 31. He was 91.

    Anderson?s credits spanned more than 180 film and TV roles over six decades after starting his Hollywood career as a messenger at MGM. But he will be best remembered for playing Goldman, the handler of the bionic duo played by Lee Majors? Steve Austin and Lyndsay Wagner?s Jaime Summers. Combined, the series (Bionic Woman was a spinoff) ran for 150 episodes and spawned several TV movies ? two of which Anderson produced.

    ?I met Richard in 1967 when he first guest starred on The Big Valley ? we worked together on five episodes,? Majors said. ?In 1974, he joined me as my boss, Oscar Goldman, in The Six Million Dollar Man. Richard became a dear and loyal friend, and I have never met a man like him. I called him ?Old Money.? His always stylish attire, his class, calmness and knowledge never faltered in his 91 years. He loved his daughters, tennis and his work as an actor. He was still the sweet, charming man when I spoke to him a few weeks ago. I will miss you, my friend.?

    Said Wagner: ?I can?t begin to say how much I have always admired and have been grateful for the elegance and loving friendship I was blessed to have with Richard Anderson. He will be greatly missed.?
    As a character actor, Anderson played everything from cowboys and outlaws to cops, doctors and government officials ? the latter is where Goldman fit in, assigning and hand-holding his bionic spies via the OSI (Office of Scientific Information).

    His film credits include the sci-fi classic Forbidden Planet, Stanley Kubrick?s Paths Of Glory, Martin Ritt?s The Long Hot Summer, John Sturges? Escape From Fort Bravo and John Frankenheimer?s Seven Days In May. On the TV side he had roles in Gunsmoke, Hawaii Five-O, Dynasty, Dan August, Perry Mason, The Fugitive, Charlie?s Angels, The A-Team, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Bonanza, Ironside, Daniel Boone and Murder, She Wrote.

    Born in Long Branch, NJ on August 8, 1926, Anderson was raised in New York City until moving to California at age 10. After serving in the Army during World War II he enrolled in the Actors Laboratory in Los Angeles, which later became the Actors Studio in New York.

    He was married to Carol Lee Ladd from 1955-1956, then married Irving Thalberg and Norma Shearer?s daughter Katherine Thalberg from 1961-1973. He is survived by his and Katherine?s three daughters Ashley Anderson, a real estate agent in Montecito; onetime UN ambassador Brooke Anderson; and Deva Anderson, a music supervisor for film and TV at Playtone.

    ?Our dad was always there for us and showed us by loving example how to live a full and rich life with gratitude, grace, humor and fun,? said Ashley Anderson. Memorial services will be private.

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    The Shape of Water

    Del Toro: Venice win vindicates sci-fi genres

    http://my.xfinity.com/articles/enter..._media_deltoro

    VENICE, Italy (AP) ? The Latest on the Venice Film Festival (all times local):
    10 p.m.

    Director Guillermo del Toro says his Venice Film Festival victory is a vindication of monster movies, science-fiction movies and other sometimes-derided cinema genres.

    Del Toro won the festival's Golden Lion top prize on Saturday for his monster movie "The Shape of Water" ? a rare victory at a top cinema festival for a fantasy film. The Mexican director says it's "a beautiful encouragement, a beautiful act of love, and I think it is something very necessary."

    The 52-year-old director says it has been his "life's mission" to show that genre films can be intelligent, artistic and beautiful. His previous films include "Hellboy" and "Pan's Labyrinth."

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    RIP Len Wein

    http://www.thewrap.com/len-wein-wolv...er-dies-at-69/

    Len Wein, Wolverine Co-Creator and ?X-Men? Reviver, Dies at 69

    Wein also co-created DC Comics? Swamp Thing

    Len Wein, the influential comics writer who co-created Marvel?s Wolverine and DC?s Swamp Thing, and who helped revive the ?X-Men? series in the 1970s, has died, his friends and industry colleagues said Sunday. He was 69.
    The cause of death was not immediately known, but since March, his Twitter feed has detailed several health issues, including a spinal surgery and an abscess on his heel bone. His most recent surgery was Thursday, according to his feed, which included jokes wishing Wein had Wolverine?s quick-healing power.

    Wein introduced Wolverine with artists John Romita Sr. and Herb Trimpe. The Canadian mutant debuted in ?The Incredible Hulk? number 181.

    In 1975, he wrote and Dave Cockrum illustrated ?Giant Size X-Men #1,? the first new X-Men story in five years, after the original team created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby slipped from popularity. The new series featured a new team including Wolverine, Nightcrawler, Storm and Colossus rescuing original X-Men Marvel Girl, Iceman and Angel, plus the recruits Havok and Polaris.

    Today, the characters Wein introduced have helped bring in more than a billion dollars onscreen in the ?X-Men? and ?Wolverine? films. And Colossus was a key player in the breakout hit ?Deadpool.?

    In 1971, Wein and artist Bernie Wrightson also introduced Swamp Thing for DC Comics. He later edited 1980s Swamp Thing stories by Alan Moore, and edited Moore and artist Dave Gibbons? celebrated, genre-bending ?Watchmen.? Both ?Swamp Thing? and ?Watchmen? also led to film adaptations.

    In 2013, Wein talked to TheWrap about how much money he was paid for co-creating Wolverine, one of the most profitable creations in comics history.*He said that while he initially received*$15 to $20 for each page he wrote, he received a ?not unreasonable? check for the film ?The Wolverine,? in part because it was named for his character.

    He said DC Comics, for which he created the Batman character Lucius Fox (played on film by Morgan Freeman), rewarded him generously.

    ?When I work for DC, anything I create I get a piece of,? said Wein. ?Lucius Fox, for example, who was in the last trilogy of Batman movies played by Morgan Freeman, bought my new house. At Marvel, I did see a check off ?The Wolverine,? the current film. But as a rule I don?t any of the ancillary money off of all of the toys and soaps and shampoos and skateboards and God knows what else that features the character."

    He is survived by his wife, attorney Christine Valada, who provided many of the recent health updates on Wein?s Twitter feed.

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    Mark LaMura Dies: 'All My Children' Star Was 68

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/news/mar...cid=spartandhp

    Emmy-nominated actor Mark LaMura, known for his role as Mark Dalton on All My Children, has died. LaMura died September 11 from lung cancer. He was 68.

    LaMura appeared on All My Children*from 1977 to 1989 and made occasional guest appearances through the ?90s. His character Mark Dalton was the brother of Susan Lucci?s Erica Kane. Lucci remembered LaMura in an Instagram post.*

    In addition to All My Children, LaMura also appeared as John Doe in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode, ?Transfigurations?. He also appeared in several theatrical productions, Shakespearean plays and The Rise Of Dorothy Hale. He portrayed Oscar Madison in the 2013 revival production of The Odd Couple*alongside Jeff Talbott as Felix Unger.*

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    Harry Dean Stanton, ?Big Love,? ?Twin Peaks? Star, Dies at 91

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/news...cid=spartandhp

    Harry Dean Stanton, the*actor with a gaunt, bedraggled look who labored in virtual obscurity for decades until a series of roles increased his visibility, including his breakthrough in Wim Wenders? ?Paris, Texas,? died of natural causes Friday in Los Angeles. He was 91.

    The actor was also known for his roles in ?Twin Peaks,? ?Big Love,? ?Pretty in Pink? and ?Repo Man.?

    He had a high-profile role as manipulative cult leader Roman Grant on HBO polygamy drama ?Big Love,? which ran from 2006-11, and recently appeared as Carl Rodd in the ?Twin Peaks? revival on Showtime.
    His most recent film, ?Lucky,? is set to be released by Magnolia on Sept. 29.

    Stanton had a good year in 1984, when he turned 58, not only starring in the Wenders pic ? his first ever as leading man ? but in Alex Cox?s popular cult film ?Repo Man.? (That year he also had a small role in John Milius? ?Red Dawn,? shouting ?Avenge me! Avenge me!? to his sons, played by Charlie Sheen and Patrick Swayze, after being captured by Soviet troops invading America.)

    In 1986, Stanton hit the mainstream when he played Molly Ringwald?s unemployed father in ?Pretty in Pink.? Even here, however, his character was still more than a little dazed: When wakened by his daughter, his first words are ?Where am I??

    Stanton played a fiery Paul/Saul in Martin Scorsese?s controversial 1988 effort ?The Last Temptation of Christ,? but the actor was among those in the film criticized by many as miscast.*Later film roles included a pair of David Lynch films in the early 1990s, ?Wild at Heart? and ?Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me?; Bob Rafelson?s ?Man Trouble,? with Nicholson; ?The Mighty,? with Gena Rowlands and Sharon Stone; ?The Green Mile?; Sean Penn?s ?The Pledge?; Nick Cassavetes? ?Alpha Dog?; and Lynch?s ?Inland Empire.?

    ?Paris, Texas,? penned by Sam Shepard, was the darling of the Cannes Film Festival, capturing not only the Palme d?Or but other juried awards as well.*Stanton played Travis, who reconnects, after a fashion, with his brother, played by Dean Stockwell, after being lost for four years. Stanton?s performance in the film was not so much powerful as it was intriguingly, sometimes hauntingly, absent.

    Roger Ebert said, ?Stanton has long inhabited the darker corners of American noir, with his lean face and hungry eyes, and here he creates a sad poetry.?

    In the cheerfully bizarre ?Repo Man,? he played the boozy repo-biz veteran who takes young punk Emilio Estevez under his wing but provides at-best nebulous guidance: ?A repo man?s life is always intense,? or ?The more you drive, the less intelligent you get.?

    Stanton was close friends with Jack Nicholson ? Stanton was best man at Nicholson?s 1962 wedding, and they lived together for more than two years after Nicholson?s divorce ? and the character actor?s first step in emerging from obscurity was a part written by Nicholson for him in the 1965 Western ?Ride the Whirlwind.? Stanton played the leader of an outlaw gang; Nicholson told him to ?let the wardrobe do the acting and just play yourself.? ?After Jack said that, my whole approach to acting opened up,? Stanton told Entertainment Weekly.

    In the early ?70s Stanton appeared in films including ?Kelly?s Heroes? and ?Two Lane Blacktop?; he also had a small role in ?The Godfather: Part II.?

    On the shoot for 1976?s ?The Missouri Breaks,? starring Marlon Brando and Nicholson, Stanton made a long-term friend in Brando when he courageously dissuaded the increasingly eccentric actor from making a foolish choice in his performance.

    The actor played one of the doomed crewmen in Ridley Scott?s ?Alien? and a crooked preacher in John Huston?s ?Wise Blood,? and he had a fairly significant role in John Carpenter?s ?Escape From New York? as Brain, who keeps the machines running in the ruined high-security prison Manhattan has become.

    In 1983, playwright Sam Shepard got to talking with Stanton at a bar in Sante Fe, N.M., and later offered him the lead role in ?Paris, Texas.? ?I was telling him I was sick of the roles I was playing,? Stanton told the New York Times. ?I told him I wanted to play something of some beauty or sensitivity. I had no inkling he was considering me for the lead in his movie.? He also worked with Shepard in the 1985 ?Fool for Love.?

    In a 2011 review of Paolo Sorrentino?s ?This Must Be the Place,? Variety said, ?Like all great directors who make a road movie, Sorrentino captures the physical location as well as the inner transformation, and in keeping with the genre, he also knows Harry Dean Stanton has to be included.?

    Stanton did voice work for the Johnny Depp animated film ?Rango? in 2011.*In a 2010 episode of NBC?s ?Chuck,? Stanton reprised his ?Repo Man? character.

    Stanton was born in West Irvine, Ky. After serving in the Navy during WWII, he attended the U. of Kentucky, studying journalism and radio and performing in ?Pygmalion,? then pursued an interest in acting by heading to California to study at the Pasadena Playhouse.

    He made his smallscreen debut in 1954 in an episode of the NBC show ?Inner Sanctum.? In another early TV role, he was directed by Alfred Hitchcock in an episode of ?Suspicion? called ?Four O?Clock.? (The actor was credited as Dean Stanton in most of his early roles to avoid confusion with the actor Harry Stanton, who died in 1978.)

    On the bigscreen, Stanton?s earliest, mostly uncredited work was in Westerns and war pics, debuting in 1957?s ?Tomahawk Trail? and appearing in 1959 Gregory Peck starrer ?Pork Chop Hill.? (He also guested on many TV Westerns, including ?The Rifleman,? ?Have Gun ? Will Travel,? ?Bonanza? and ?Gunsmoke?).

    Stanton also led his own band, first known as Harry Dean Stanton and the Repo Men and later simply as the Harry Dean Stanton Band, and would play pickup gigs in L.A. area clubs. Bob Dylan, with whom he worked on Sam Peckinpah?s 1973 film ?Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid,? was a friend. Another friend was Hunter S. Thompson, and Stanton sang at his funeral.

    The character actor was the subject of two documentaries: 2011?s ?Harry Dean Stanton: Crossing Mulholland? and Sophie Huber?s 2013 ?Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction,? which featured interviews with Wenders, Shepard, Kris Kristofferson and Lynch.

    He never married, though he has said he has ?one or two children.?

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    The Shape of Water

    Del Toro: Venice win vindicates sci-fi genres

    http://my.xfinity.com/articles/enter..._media_deltoro

    VENICE, Italy (AP) ? The Latest on the Venice Film Festival (all times local):
    10 p.m.

    Director Guillermo del Toro says his Venice Film Festival victory is a vindication of monster movies, science-fiction movies and other sometimes-derided cinema genres.

    Del Toro won the festival's Golden Lion top prize on Saturday for his monster movie "The Shape of Water" ? a rare victory at a top cinema festival for a fantasy film. The Mexican director says it's "a beautiful encouragement, a beautiful act of love, and I think it is something very necessary."

    The 52-year-old director says it has been his "life's mission" to show that genre films can be intelligent, artistic and beautiful. His previous films include "Hellboy" and "Pan's Labyrinth."

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