The Low-Wage Recovery and Growing Inequality

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  1. #1
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    The Low-Wage Recovery and Growing Inequality






    Summary

    This report updates NELP?s previous analyses of job loss and job growth trends during and after the Great Recession. We find that:

    1 During the recession, employment losses occurred throughout the economy, but were concentrated in mid-wage occupations. By contrast, during the recovery, employment gains have been concentrated in lower-wage occupations, which grew 2.7 times as fast as mid-wage and higher-wage occupations. Specifically:

    * Lower-wage occupations were 21 percent of recession losses, but 58 percent of recovery growth.
    * Mid-wage occupations were 60 percent of recession losses, but only 22 percent of recovery growth.
    * Higher-wage occupations were 19 percent of recession job losses, and 20 percent of recovery growth.

    2 The lower-wage occupations that grew the most during the recovery include retail salespersons, food preparation workers, laborers and freight workers, waiters and waitresses, personal and home care aides, and office clerks and customer representatives.

    3 The unbalanced recession and recovery have meant that the long-term rise in inequality in the U.S. continues. The good jobs deficit is now deeper than it was at the start of the 21st century:

    * Since the first quarter of 2001, employment has grown by 8.7 percent in lower-wage occupations and by 6.6 percent in higher-wage occupations.

    * By contrast, employment in mid-wage occupations has fallen by 7.3.


    4 Industry dynamics are playing an important role in shaping the unbalanced recovery. We find that three low-wage industries (food services, retail, and employment services) added 1.7 million jobs over the past two years, fully 43 percent of net employment growth. At the same time, better-paying industries (like construction; manufacturing; finance, insurance and real estate; and information) did not grow, or did not grow enough to make up for recession losses. Other better-paying industries (like professional and technical services) saw solid growth, but not in their mid-wage occupations. And steep cuts in state and local government have hit mid- and higher-wage occupations the hardest.

    In short, America?s good jobs deficit continues. Policymakers have understandably been focused on the urgent goal of getting U.S. employment back to where it was before the recession (we are still missing nearly 10 million jobs), but our findings underscore that job quality is rapidly emerging as a second front in the struggling recovery.

    http://www.nelp.org/page/-/Job_Creat...12.pdf?nocdn=1

    and this goes right back to the 2010 SSA Wage Data that I have posted time and time again...
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by LAM View Post
    4 Industry dynamics are playing an important role in shaping the unbalanced recovery. We find that three low-wage industries (food services, retail, and employment services) added 1.7 million jobs over the past two years, fully 43 percent of net employment growth. At the same time, better-paying industries (like construction; manufacturing; finance, insurance and real estate; and information) did not grow, or did not grow enough to make up for recession losses.
    Sounds like a further shift toward a consumption based economy.

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    the continuing trend that started 3-4 decades ago when the US went from being a country where the majority could save and consume to a country where only the minority (top 20% can do so). now the US consumes goods made by foreign labor markets and wages for those that labor in the US are eroded by the ever expanding monetary base to fuel the debt needed by the self serving US financial sector.

    with the exception of the rent seeking that is allowed by the US gov by the financial sector on the working class the US economy in function is turning into exactly that of Mexico.
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by troubador View Post
    Sounds like a further shift toward a consumption based economy.
    Shift towards?

    Unfortunately, we are already there. 71%+ of the US economy is propelled & dependent on people buying shit.
    It's an accurate statement that our current spending will not be increasing the debt We've stopped spending money that we don't have.

    -- Jack Lew, then director of the Office of Management and Budget, in Feb. 16, 2011 testimony before the Senate Budget Committee.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Smoothy View Post
    Shift towards?

    Unfortunately, we are already there. 71%+ of the US economy is propelled & dependent on people buying shit.
    The question is how much of the spending is discretionary? People need a place to live, food to eat, and clothes to wear. So the blanket number of 71% (if real) means little.


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