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Is it ok for someone 16 to take creatine? any stunting of growth with it?

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  1. #1
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    Is it ok for someone 16 to take creatine? any stunting of growth with it?






    ?

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    Is glutamine ok as well?

  3. #3
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    It's okay, no it will not stunt your growth.

    Typically we advise teens to concentrate on diet and real food, and wait awhile before using supplements other than protein powders.





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  4. #4
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    L-Glutamine is a single amino acid and it's safe but you should avoid taking it on an empty stomach. It's better to mix it with a protein shake, it can be dangerous ingested by itself.

    But, again your focus at 16 really should be eating.





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  5. #5
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    I eat plenty though. I eat tons of healthy food and stuff - lots of fruits and vegetables. But do you think it is ok if I take creatine and l glutamine? And it will give me actual muscle weight (some water) but not fat right?

    I'm just saying I know I eat lots of food. That isn't a problem at all. I'm not skinny at all either. I'm just wondering if it it would be ok, given that i eat lots of food, if I take the creatine and glutamine. Is there anything else besides these as well?

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    bump

  7. #7
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    Both of these supplements are okay, they're not going to hurt you.

    Do you take a multi-vitamin/mineral? Cause that would be more important than Creatine & Glutamine.





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  8. #8
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    yeah but is it best to take the multivitamin a couple hours after the workout?

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    oh yeah what would the vitamins do for me? btw i take the gnc mega men

  10. #10
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    most people take their multi's in the morning.

    well, each vitamin and mineral has it's role in the body, but overall it is to promote health.


    Vitamins

    Vitamin A: Helps to maintain your skin and mucous membranes, and contributes to the function of night vision. Excess vitamin A intake can be toxic, since this vitamin is fat-soluble. Vitamin A can be found in carrots and leafy yellow vegetables. Beta Carotene, one of the carotenoids in dark green and orange vegetables, serves as a precursor to Vitamin A.

    Vitamins B1 (Thiamin): Responsible for carbohydrate metabolism along with the function of your nervous system. More than 1,000 milligrams might cause increased urination and possible dehydration. Because this vitamin is water-soluble, daily replacement is necessary. Whole grains are the best source of B1.

    Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin): An active agent in the metabolism of energy and cell maintenance. It also is an essential ingredient in the repair of all cells following injury. Milk and eggs are excellent sources of Vitamin B2.

    Vitamin B3 (Niacin): Has numerous responsibilities in various bodily functions, and is present in every cell in your body. This vitamin can cause hot flashes, but you can build a tolerance to this vitamin, and find it helpful in the reduction of high cholesterol. Peanuts and poultry prove to be fine sources of B3.

    Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid): Essential in the formation of the chemical acetylcholine, which is involved in nerve transmission, memory, and is crucial in the metabolism of energy. Poultry, fish and whole grains provide you with ample levels of this vitamin.

    Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine): Involved in the metabolism of sugar, fat and protein. A limit of 300 mg. per day will be adequate for any athlete. Pyridoxine can be found in foods like wheat germ, fish, and walnuts.

    Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin): Refers to substances containing the mineral cobalt, which is important in the metabolism of protein and fat, and is an aid in producing red blood cells. Sources include liver, oysters and clams.

    Vitamin B15 (Pangamate or Pangamic Acid): A coenzyme involved in respiration, protein synthesis and regulation of steroid hormones. Its principal effect is to increase blood and oxygen supplies to tissue. Deficiency produces no apparent negative effects, which leads some conservative nutritionists to the conclusion that it is not a “true” vitamin. B15 is found principally in Brewer’s Yeast, organ meats and whole grains.

    Folic Acid (Folacin): Helper substance of the B complex group, especially in red blood cell formation. Five milligrams a day is recommended for athletes.
    Biotin: Helps to metabolize carbohydrates and fats. Best sources are brown rice and soybeans.

    Choline: An agent helpful in the use of the B complex vitamins. It is crucial in normal brain function (notably memory), and acts as a factor in metabolizing fat and cholesterol. The best food sources are eggs and lecithin.

    Inositol: Also helpful in the use of B complex vitamins. It acts with choline in metabolizing fat and cholesterol. In addition, it plays an important role in the transmission of nerve impulses. Lecithin and wheat germ are good sources of Inositol.

    Para-amino-benzoic acid (PABA): Essential for normal skin and hair growth. Sources include whole grains and wheat germ. It is (at least partially) synthesized in the intestinal flora, a fact which has led conservative nutritionists to deny a need for it in the diet.

    Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid): A water-soluble vitamin involved in various bodily functions, but may produce diarrhea and mild diuretic effects in some people. Citrus fruits provide a good source of C.

    Bioflavonoids: Chemicals that contribute to the strength of your capillaries and help to protect vitamin C stores in your body. These vitamins can be found in fresh raw vegetables and fruits.

    Vitamin D (Calciferol): A fat-soluble vitamin that regulates calcium and phosphate metabolism in your body. This vitamin is actually formed on your skin via ultraviolet rays from light when it reacts with cholesterol in your skin. Sunlight serves as the best source of D, but this vitamin is also added to milk to make it another good source.

    Vitamin E (d-alpha tocopherol succinate): Another fat-soluble vitamin that has numerous responsibilities in your body. Recent research clearly shows the importance of Vitamin E in fighting the ravages of free radical damage inside your body. If ever there was an “anti-aging” elixir, this is it. (See the section on antioxidants later in this manual.) Food sources available are wheat germ, green leafy vegetables, whole grains and vegetable oils.

    Vitamin K (“K” stands for “Koagulation”): This vitamin is implicated in proper blood clotting. It is synthesized in the intestinal flora. Because it is fat-soluble, it has the potential for toxicity if taken in large doses. There is no established RDA for vitamin K.


    Minerals

    Calcium: The most abundant mineral in your body. It helps to make up your teeth and bones and is needed for muscle contractions. According to reliable sources, only about ten percent of the calcium in dairy products is absorbed in your body. No wonder many people are deficient in this mineral. This deficiency is part of the reason why athletes often experience stress fractures. Good sources of calcium are dairy products and calcium carbonate supplements.

    Magnesium: Another mineral essential to muscle contraction, notably in the relaxation phase. Lacking magnesium will result in fatigue, spasms, muscle twitching and muscle weakness. Foods that provide you with quality magnesium are soybeans, leafy vegetables, brown rice, whole wheat, apples, seeds and nuts.

    Phosphorus: The second most abundant mineral in your body. It’s involved in muscle contractions, and helps in the utilization of food stuffs. However, consuming excessive quantities of phosphorus you might experience a depletion of calcium and magnesium in your bones, muscles and organs, resulting in weakness. Fish and poultry contain quality phosphorus.

    Iron: Essential in making hemoglobin or oxygen in your blood, and is crucial in the transportation of oxygen during endurance activities. An intake of more than 50 milligrams a day for prolonged periods can be toxic. Interestingly, coffee and tea consumption can limit the absorption of iron. The best source of iron is meat. Even cooking in an iron skillet can increase the iron content in your food.

    Copper: Helps to convert iron to hemoglobin and promotes the use of vitamin C. Most foods have copper in them.

    Zinc: Responsible for cell growth by acting as an agent in protein synthesis, and aids in the use of vitamin A and the B complex. It prolongs muscle contractions, and therefore increases your endurance. Sources include eggs, whole grains and oysters.

    Manganese: A mineral essential in numerous functions, including glandular secretions, the metabolism of protein and brain function. Too much manganese can inhibit the absorption of iron. Food sources are tea, leafy green vegetables and whole grains.

    Sodium and Potassium: Minerals that need to have a balance in order to support maximal muscular power. These minerals are needed in the transmission of nerve impulses. Deficiencies will produce cramping and weakness. Good sources are green leafy vegetables, bananas, citrus and dried fruits. Incidentally, salt tablets for sodium intake are a no-no!





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  11. #11
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    Originally posted by Prince
    L-Glutamine is a single amino acid and it's safe but you should avoid taking it on an empty stomach. It's better to mix it with a protein shake, it can be dangerous ingested by itself.

    But, again your focus at 16 really should be eating.
    Whats wrong with taking glutamine on empty stomach? I did not know it cud hurt in any way...

  12. #12
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    i always take glut on a empty stomach and take it with fruit juice is that bad?
    yo

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