Spies use smartphone apps to spy on you

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    Spies use smartphone apps to spy on you

    RAPHAEL SATTER, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

    POSTED: Monday, January 27, 2014, 7:36 PM

    LONDON (AP) - Documents leaked by former NSA contactor Edward Snowden suggest that spy agencies have a powerful ally in Angry Birds and a host of other apps installed on smartphones across the globe.
    The documents, published Monday by The New York Times, the Guardian, and ProPublica, suggest that the mapping, gaming, and social networking apps which are a common feature of the world's estimated 1 billion smartphones can feed America's National Security Agency and Britain's GCHQ with huge amounts of personal data, including location information and details such as political affiliation or sexual orientation.
    The size and scope of the program aren't publicly known, but the reports suggest that U.S. and British intelligence easily get routine access to data generated by apps such as the Angry Birds game franchise or the Google Maps navigation service.
    The joint spying program "effectively means that anyone using Google Maps on a smartphone is working in support of a GCHQ system," one 2008 document from the British eavesdropping agency is quoted as saying. Another document - a hand-drawn picture of a smirking fairy conjuring up a tottering pile of papers over a table marked "LEAVE TRAFFIC HERE" - suggests that gathering the data doesn't take much effort.


    Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/busines...cx6Djs6jpL9.99



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    well thats not scary at all

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    i'm watching you



    ALL POSTS ARE FOR ENTERTAINMENT ONLY..

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    Good post. Thanks for doing that. A guy at works was discussing this with me. Big Brother!
    war is peace
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    Quote Originally Posted by SheriV View Post
    RAPHAEL SATTER, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

    POSTED: Monday, January 27, 2014, 7:36 PM

    LONDON (AP) - Documents leaked by former NSA contactor Edward Snowden suggest that spy agencies have a powerful ally in Angry Birds and a host of other apps installed on smartphones across the globe.
    The documents, published Monday by The New York Times, the Guardian, and ProPublica, suggest that the mapping, gaming, and social networking apps which are a common feature of the world's estimated 1 billion smartphones can feed America's National Security Agency and Britain's GCHQ with huge amounts of personal data, including location information and details such as political affiliation or sexual orientation.
    The size and scope of the program aren't publicly known, but the reports suggest that U.S. and British intelligence easily get routine access to data generated by apps such as the Angry Birds game franchise or the Google Maps navigation service.
    The joint spying program "effectively means that anyone using Google Maps on a smartphone is working in support of a GCHQ system," one 2008 document from the British eavesdropping agency is quoted as saying. Another document - a hand-drawn picture of a smirking fairy conjuring up a tottering pile of papers over a table marked "LEAVE TRAFFIC HERE" - suggests that gathering the data doesn't take much effort.


    Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/busines...cx6Djs6jpL9.99



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    Just in case they are accessing the camera on my phone I always have it facing me when I'm jerking off. Give them something to watch.
    If gunners were as violent as anti-gunners believe, logically there wouldn't be any anti-gunners left.

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    Quote Originally Posted by s2h View Post
    i'm watching you

    God see all

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    it kinda pisses me off the shits in google maps and angry birds...what phone doesn't have these

    is RIM ever gonna come back

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    Quote Originally Posted by SheriV View Post
    it kinda pisses me off the shits in google maps and angry birds...what phone doesn't have these

    is RIM ever gonna come back

    Lol, you really think RIM was/is safe? They probably gave the back door keys to the NSA on first request.

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    RIM for a long time was the only thing allowed in defense installations... NSA couldnt get through their encryption for a long fucking time.
    This was actually their big claim to fame

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    That's what they want you to believe (RIM and the NSA).

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    im not gonna say how i know this but the fact that the other half makes weapons of mass destruction should give you n idea where I've gotten this info

    droid and apple just handed over the reigns with known backdoors..hell built in backdoors as it turns out.
    RIM even if they are making death noises for years now is the only company that still continually reinvents its encryption to not be broken into...the nsa keeps getting the info but not with RIMs help

    as far as them being the only device allowed on defense installations, thats no longer true and hasn't been for at least 5 years now.

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    oh..and its not to say that it was specifically to keep the nsa out but any others countries spying programs out as well

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    I really liked RIM. Blackberries were much better for professional use than Droid or Apple. I wish they would mount a comeback.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by SheriV View Post
    well thats not scary at all
    http://www.criticalcommons.org/Membe...ntage.mov/view
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dave 236 View Post
    I really liked RIM. Blackberries were much better for professional use than Droid or Apple. I wish they would mount a comeback.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk

    yeah me too...i miss the shit out of my blackberry


    I drowned one on the deck in an overnight downpour
    picked that sucker up pouring water out of it the next day....shook it a few times and it booted right up..lol
    worked fine.

    the one before that was sitting next to a melted in two tv next to it in my house fire...that one I scratched the soot off of it and it booted right up
    it took my ins adjuster two weeks to convince me to just replace it..lol
    he had a point..it smelled pretty funky

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    BB actually makes a decent phone now. Also several companies are starting to look into the concept of a more secure phone. Usually these are just customized android. Android can be VERY secure if you know how to set it up. Apple can also be set up to be pretty secure. I'd love and iPhone but I need more of a screen.
    Anything said by exerciseordie is for educational purposes only! PERIOD!!!! Don't do illegal shit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by heady muscle View Post
    Lower Merion School District is very affluent, they are in the top 5 for per capita income in the country and the top 10 for household income it's where my father used to teach. I'm surprised I never heard of this before.
    William F. Buckley describes a conservative as, "someone who stands athwart history, yelling Stop." - and then proceeds to drag civilization back to times best left in history's dungheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAM View Post
    Lower Merion School District is very affluent, they are in the top 5 for per capita income in the country and the top 10 for household income it's where my father used to teach. I'm surprised I never heard of this before.
    It was all over the corporate news and the web when it was discovered. Serious BS.

    http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/q...-1226358220320

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    Quote Originally Posted by exerciseordie View Post
    BB actually makes a decent phone now. Also several companies are starting to look into the concept of a more secure phone. Usually these are just customized android. Android can be VERY secure if you know how to set it up. Apple can also be set up to be pretty secure. I'd love and iPhone but I need more of a screen.

    you kidding..iphone worked WITH the nsa for a backdoor...Im sure you can root it and close it up
    and I dont trust my driod for security. I didn't before and really don't now.
    RIM had a phone they were set to launch this year that I guess was pretty impressive and had a feature to wrap around existing apps...I have no idea what carriers will be carrying it though or if will be an open phone only.

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    I liked BB maps way better than google maps too

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    Quote Originally Posted by SheriV View Post
    you kidding..iphone worked WITH the nsa for a backdoor...Im sure you can root it and close it up
    and I dont trust my driod for security. I didn't before and really don't now.
    RIM had a phone they were set to launch this year that I guess was pretty impressive and had a feature to wrap around existing apps...I have no idea what carriers will be carrying it though or if will be an open phone only.
    There is a phone coming out that is meant to be completely secure....the OS is customized android. None of them come all that secure, you have to make them secure.
    Anything said by exerciseordie is for educational purposes only! PERIOD!!!! Don't do illegal shit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by exerciseordie View Post
    There is a phone coming out that is meant to be completely secure....the OS is customized android. None of them come all that secure, you have to make them secure.
    What is the name of it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by heady muscle View Post
    What is the name of it?
    I think it was 'Blackphone' or something
    Anything said by exerciseordie is for educational purposes only! PERIOD!!!! Don't do illegal shit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaphod View Post
    Just in case they are accessing the camera on my phone I always have it facing me when I'm jerking off. Give them something to watch.
    Did this with a BF... I hope no one else was watching! WTF!?!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenie View Post
    Did this with a BF... I hope no one else was watching! WTF!?!
    ^ You need to find your way to the AG SECTION girl!

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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/csec...ents-1.2517881


    CSEC used airport Wi-Fi to track Canadian travellers: Edward Snowden documents



    A top secret document retrieved by U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden and obtained by CBC News shows that Canada's electronic spy agency used information from the free internet service at a major Canadian airport to track the wireless devices of thousands of ordinary airline passengers for days after they left the terminal.

    After reviewing the document, one of Canada's foremost authorities on cyber-security says the clandestine operation by the Communications Security Establishment Canada ( CSEC) was almost certainly illegal.

    Ronald Deibert told CBC News: "I can't see any circumstance in which this would not be unlawful, under current Canadian law, under our Charter, under CSEC's mandates."

    The spy agency is supposed to be collecting primarily foreign intelligence by intercepting overseas phone and internet traffic, and is prohibited by law from targeting Canadians or anyone in Canada without a judicial warrant.

    As CSEC chief John Forster recently stated: "I can tell you that we do not target Canadians at home or abroad in our foreign intelligence activities, nor do we target anyone in Canada.

    "In fact, it's prohibited by law. Protecting the privacy of Canadians is our most important principle."

    But security experts who have been apprised of the document point out the airline passengers in a Canadian airport were clearly in Canada.

    CSEC said in a written statement to CBC News that it is "mandated to collect foreign signals intelligence to protect Canada and Canadians. And in order to fulfill that key foreign intelligence role for the country, CSEC is legally authorized to collect and analyze metadata."

    Metadata reveals a trove of information including, for example, the location and telephone numbers of all calls a person makes and receives ? but not the content of the call, which would legally be considered a private communication and cannot be intercepted without a warrant.

    "No Canadian communications were (or are) targeted, collected or used," the agency says.

    In the case of the airport tracking operation, the metadata apparently identified travelers' wireless devices, but not the content of calls made or emails sent from them.
    Black Code

    Diebert is author of the book Black Code: Inside the Battle for Cyberspace, which is about internet surveillance, and he heads the world-renowned Citizen Lab cyber research program at the University of Toronto's Munk School of Global Affairs.

    He says that whatever CSEC calls it, the tracking of those passengers was nothing less than an "indiscriminate collection and analysis of Canadians' communications data," and he could not imagine any circumstances that would have convinced a judge to authorize it.

    The latest Snowden document indicates the spy service was provided with information captured from unsuspecting travellers' wireless devices by the airport's free Wi-Fi system over a two-week period.

    Experts say that probably included many Canadians whose smartphone and laptop signals were intercepted without their knowledge as they passed through the terminal.

    The document shows the federal intelligence agency was then able to track the travellers for a week or more as they ? and their wireless devices ? showed up in other Wi-Fi "hot spots" in cities across Canada and even at U.S. airports.

    That included people visiting other airports, hotels, coffee shops and restaurants, libraries, ground transportation hubs, and any number of places among the literally thousands with public wireless internet access.

    The document shows CSEC had so much data it could even track the travellers back in time through the days leading up to their arrival at the airport, these experts say.

    While the documents make no mention of specific individuals, Deibert and other cyber experts say it would be simple for the spy agency to have put names to all the Canadians swept up in the operation.

    All Canadians with a smartphone, tablet or laptop are "essentially carrying around digital dog tags as we go about our daily lives," Deibert says.

    Anyone able to access the data that those devices leave behind on wireless hotspots, he says, can obtain "extraordinarily precise information about our movements and social relationships."
    Trial run for NSA

    The document indicates the passenger tracking operation was a trial run of a powerful new software program CSEC was developing with help from its U.S. counterpart, the National Security Agency.

    In the document, CSEC called the new technologies "game-changing," and said they could be used for tracking "any target that makes occasional forays into other cities/regions."

    Sources tell CBC News the technologies tested on Canadians in 2012 have since become fully operational.

    CSEC claims "no Canadian or foreign travellers' movements were 'tracked,'" although it does not explain why it put the word "tracked" in quotation marks.

    Deibert says metadata is "way more powerful that the content of communications. You can tell a lot more about people, their habits, their relationships, their friendships, even their political preferences, based on that type of metadata."

    The document does not say exactly how the Canadian spy service managed to get its hands on two weeks' of travellers' wireless data from the airport Wi-Fi system, although there are indications it was provided voluntarily by a "special source."

    The country's two largest airports ? Toronto and Vancouver ? both say they have never supplied CSEC or other Canadian intelligence agency with information on passengers' Wi-Fi use.

    Alana Lawrence, a spokesperson for the Vancouver Airport Authority, says it operates the free Wi-Fi there, but does "not in any way store any personal data associated with it," and has never received a request from any Canadian intelligence agency for it.

    A U.S.-based company, Boingo, is the largest independent supplier of Wi-Fi services at other Canadian airports, including Pearson International in Toronto.

    Spokesperson Katie O'Neill tells CBC News: "To the best of our knowledge, [Boingo] has not provided any information about any of our users to the Canadian government, law enforcement or intelligence agencies."

    It is also unclear from the document how CSEC managed to penetrate so many wireless systems to see who was using them ? specifically, to know every time someone targeted at the airport showed up on one of those other Wi-Fi networks elsewhere.

    Deibert and other experts say the federal intelligence agency must have gained direct access to at least some of the country's main telephone and internet pipelines, allowing the mass-surveillance of Canadian emails and phone calls.
    'Blown away'

    Ontario's privacy commissioner Ann Cavoukian says she is "blown away" by the revelations.

    "It is really unbelievable that CSEC would engage in that kind of surveillance of Canadians. Of us.

    "I mean that could have been me at the airport walking around? This resembles the activities of a totalitarian state, not a free and open society."

    Experts say the document makes clear CSEC intended to share both the technologies and future information generated by it with Canada's official spying partners ? the U.S., Britain, New Zealand and Australia, the so-called Five Eyes intelligence network.

    Indeed, the spy agency boasts in its leaked document that, in an apparently separate pilot project, it obtained access to two communications systems with more than 300,000 users, and was then able to "sweep" an entire mid-sized Canadian city to pinpoint a specific imaginary target in a fictional kidnapping.

    The document dated May 2012 is a 27-page power-point presentation by CSEC describing its airport tracking operation.

    While the document was in the trove of secret NSA files retrieved by Snowden, it bears CSEC's logo and clearly originated with the Canadian spy service.

    Wesley Wark, a renowned authority on international security and intelligence, agrees with Deibert.

    "I cannot see any way in which it fits CSEC's legal mandate."

    Wark says the document suggests CSEC was "trying to push the technological boundaries" in part to impress its other international counterparts in the Five-Eyes intelligence network.

    "This document is kind of suffused with the language of technological gee-whiz."

    Wark says if CSEC's use of "very powerful and intrusive technological tools" puts it outside its mandate and even the law, "then you are in a situation for democracy where you simply don't want to be."

    Like Wark and other experts interviewed for this story, Deibert says there's no question Canada needs CSEC to be gathering foreign intelligence, "but they must do it within a framework of proper checks and balances so their formidable powers can never be abused. And that's the missing ingredient right now in Canada."

    The only official oversight of CSEC's spying operations is a retired judge appointed by the prime minister, and reporting to the minister of defence who is also responsible for the intelligence agency.

    CSEC's defanged watchdog: Greg Weston

    "Here we clearly have an agency of the state collecting in an indiscriminate and bulk fashion all of Canadian communications and the oversight mechanism is flimsy at best," Deibert says.

    "Those to me are circumstances ripe for potential abuse."

    CSEC spends over $400 million a year, and employs about 2,000 people, almost half of whom are involved in intercepting phone conversations, and hacking into computer systems supposedly in other countries.

    It has long been Canada's most secretive spy agency, responding to almost all questions about its operations with reassurances it is doing nothing wrong.

    Privacy watchdog Cavoukian says there has to be "greater openness and transparency because without that there can be no accountability.

    "This trust-me model that the government is advancing and CSEC is advancing ? 'Oh just trust us, we're doing the right thing, don't worry' ? yes, worry! We have very good reason to worry."

    In the U.S., Snowden exposed massive metadata collection by the National Security Agency, which is said to have scooped up private phone and internet records of more than 100 million Americans.

    A U.S. judge recently called the NSA's metadata collection an Orwellian surveillance program that is likely unconstitutional.

    The public furor over NSA snooping prompted a White House review of the American spy agency's operations, and President Barack Obama recently vowed to clamp down on the collection and use of metadata.

    Cavoukian says Canadians deserve nothing less.

    "Look at the U.S. ? they've been talking about these matters involving national security for months now very publicly because the public deserves answers.

    "And that's what I would tell our government, our minister of national defence and our prime minister: We demand some answers to this."

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    Big Brother has no borders!

    Quote Originally Posted by OfficerFarva View Post
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/csec...ents-1.2517881


    CSEC used airport Wi-Fi to track Canadian travellers: Edward Snowden documents



    A top secret document retrieved by U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden and obtained by CBC News shows that Canada's electronic spy agency used information from the free internet service at a major Canadian airport to track the wireless devices of thousands of ordinary airline passengers for days after they left the terminal.

    After reviewing the document, one of Canada's foremost authorities on cyber-security says the clandestine operation by the Communications Security Establishment Canada ( CSEC) was almost certainly illegal.

    Ronald Deibert told CBC News: "I can't see any circumstance in which this would not be unlawful, under current Canadian law, under our Charter, under CSEC's mandates."

    The spy agency is supposed to be collecting primarily foreign intelligence by intercepting overseas phone and internet traffic, and is prohibited by law from targeting Canadians or anyone in Canada without a judicial warrant.

    As CSEC chief John Forster recently stated: "I can tell you that we do not target Canadians at home or abroad in our foreign intelligence activities, nor do we target anyone in Canada.

    "In fact, it's prohibited by law. Protecting the privacy of Canadians is our most important principle."

    But security experts who have been apprised of the document point out the airline passengers in a Canadian airport were clearly in Canada.

    CSEC said in a written statement to CBC News that it is "mandated to collect foreign signals intelligence to protect Canada and Canadians. And in order to fulfill that key foreign intelligence role for the country, CSEC is legally authorized to collect and analyze metadata."

    Metadata reveals a trove of information including, for example, the location and telephone numbers of all calls a person makes and receives ? but not the content of the call, which would legally be considered a private communication and cannot be intercepted without a warrant.

    "No Canadian communications were (or are) targeted, collected or used," the agency says.

    In the case of the airport tracking operation, the metadata apparently identified travelers' wireless devices, but not the content of calls made or emails sent from them.
    Black Code

    Diebert is author of the book Black Code: Inside the Battle for Cyberspace, which is about internet surveillance, and he heads the world-renowned Citizen Lab cyber research program at the University of Toronto's Munk School of Global Affairs.

    He says that whatever CSEC calls it, the tracking of those passengers was nothing less than an "indiscriminate collection and analysis of Canadians' communications data," and he could not imagine any circumstances that would have convinced a judge to authorize it.

    The latest Snowden document indicates the spy service was provided with information captured from unsuspecting travellers' wireless devices by the airport's free Wi-Fi system over a two-week period.

    Experts say that probably included many Canadians whose smartphone and laptop signals were intercepted without their knowledge as they passed through the terminal.

    The document shows the federal intelligence agency was then able to track the travellers for a week or more as they ? and their wireless devices ? showed up in other Wi-Fi "hot spots" in cities across Canada and even at U.S. airports.

    That included people visiting other airports, hotels, coffee shops and restaurants, libraries, ground transportation hubs, and any number of places among the literally thousands with public wireless internet access.

    The document shows CSEC had so much data it could even track the travellers back in time through the days leading up to their arrival at the airport, these experts say.

    While the documents make no mention of specific individuals, Deibert and other cyber experts say it would be simple for the spy agency to have put names to all the Canadians swept up in the operation.

    All Canadians with a smartphone, tablet or laptop are "essentially carrying around digital dog tags as we go about our daily lives," Deibert says.

    Anyone able to access the data that those devices leave behind on wireless hotspots, he says, can obtain "extraordinarily precise information about our movements and social relationships."
    Trial run for NSA

    The document indicates the passenger tracking operation was a trial run of a powerful new software program CSEC was developing with help from its U.S. counterpart, the National Security Agency.

    In the document, CSEC called the new technologies "game-changing," and said they could be used for tracking "any target that makes occasional forays into other cities/regions."

    Sources tell CBC News the technologies tested on Canadians in 2012 have since become fully operational.

    CSEC claims "no Canadian or foreign travellers' movements were 'tracked,'" although it does not explain why it put the word "tracked" in quotation marks.

    Deibert says metadata is "way more powerful that the content of communications. You can tell a lot more about people, their habits, their relationships, their friendships, even their political preferences, based on that type of metadata."

    The document does not say exactly how the Canadian spy service managed to get its hands on two weeks' of travellers' wireless data from the airport Wi-Fi system, although there are indications it was provided voluntarily by a "special source."

    The country's two largest airports ? Toronto and Vancouver ? both say they have never supplied CSEC or other Canadian intelligence agency with information on passengers' Wi-Fi use.

    Alana Lawrence, a spokesperson for the Vancouver Airport Authority, says it operates the free Wi-Fi there, but does "not in any way store any personal data associated with it," and has never received a request from any Canadian intelligence agency for it.

    A U.S.-based company, Boingo, is the largest independent supplier of Wi-Fi services at other Canadian airports, including Pearson International in Toronto.

    Spokesperson Katie O'Neill tells CBC News: "To the best of our knowledge, [Boingo] has not provided any information about any of our users to the Canadian government, law enforcement or intelligence agencies."

    It is also unclear from the document how CSEC managed to penetrate so many wireless systems to see who was using them ? specifically, to know every time someone targeted at the airport showed up on one of those other Wi-Fi networks elsewhere.

    Deibert and other experts say the federal intelligence agency must have gained direct access to at least some of the country's main telephone and internet pipelines, allowing the mass-surveillance of Canadian emails and phone calls.
    'Blown away'

    Ontario's privacy commissioner Ann Cavoukian says she is "blown away" by the revelations.

    "It is really unbelievable that CSEC would engage in that kind of surveillance of Canadians. Of us.

    "I mean that could have been me at the airport walking around? This resembles the activities of a totalitarian state, not a free and open society."

    Experts say the document makes clear CSEC intended to share both the technologies and future information generated by it with Canada's official spying partners ? the U.S., Britain, New Zealand and Australia, the so-called Five Eyes intelligence network.

    Indeed, the spy agency boasts in its leaked document that, in an apparently separate pilot project, it obtained access to two communications systems with more than 300,000 users, and was then able to "sweep" an entire mid-sized Canadian city to pinpoint a specific imaginary target in a fictional kidnapping.

    The document dated May 2012 is a 27-page power-point presentation by CSEC describing its airport tracking operation.

    While the document was in the trove of secret NSA files retrieved by Snowden, it bears CSEC's logo and clearly originated with the Canadian spy service.

    Wesley Wark, a renowned authority on international security and intelligence, agrees with Deibert.

    "I cannot see any way in which it fits CSEC's legal mandate."

    Wark says the document suggests CSEC was "trying to push the technological boundaries" in part to impress its other international counterparts in the Five-Eyes intelligence network.

    "This document is kind of suffused with the language of technological gee-whiz."

    Wark says if CSEC's use of "very powerful and intrusive technological tools" puts it outside its mandate and even the law, "then you are in a situation for democracy where you simply don't want to be."

    Like Wark and other experts interviewed for this story, Deibert says there's no question Canada needs CSEC to be gathering foreign intelligence, "but they must do it within a framework of proper checks and balances so their formidable powers can never be abused. And that's the missing ingredient right now in Canada."

    The only official oversight of CSEC's spying operations is a retired judge appointed by the prime minister, and reporting to the minister of defence who is also responsible for the intelligence agency.

    CSEC's defanged watchdog: Greg Weston

    "Here we clearly have an agency of the state collecting in an indiscriminate and bulk fashion all of Canadian communications and the oversight mechanism is flimsy at best," Deibert says.

    "Those to me are circumstances ripe for potential abuse."

    CSEC spends over $400 million a year, and employs about 2,000 people, almost half of whom are involved in intercepting phone conversations, and hacking into computer systems supposedly in other countries.

    It has long been Canada's most secretive spy agency, responding to almost all questions about its operations with reassurances it is doing nothing wrong.

    Privacy watchdog Cavoukian says there has to be "greater openness and transparency because without that there can be no accountability.

    "This trust-me model that the government is advancing and CSEC is advancing ? 'Oh just trust us, we're doing the right thing, don't worry' ? yes, worry! We have very good reason to worry."

    In the U.S., Snowden exposed massive metadata collection by the National Security Agency, which is said to have scooped up private phone and internet records of more than 100 million Americans.

    A U.S. judge recently called the NSA's metadata collection an Orwellian surveillance program that is likely unconstitutional.

    The public furor over NSA snooping prompted a White House review of the American spy agency's operations, and President Barack Obama recently vowed to clamp down on the collection and use of metadata.

    Cavoukian says Canadians deserve nothing less.

    "Look at the U.S. ? they've been talking about these matters involving national security for months now very publicly because the public deserves answers.

    "And that's what I would tell our government, our minister of national defence and our prime minister: We demand some answers to this."

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    This will only get worse as technology advances. By the time enough people care it will be too late.


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