Trans-Fatty Acids

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    Trans-Fatty Acids

    http://www.mercola.com/2003/jul/19/trans_fat.htm

    Key Quotes:

    Trans fat is known to increase blood levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL), or "bad" cholesterol, while lowering levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL), known as "good" cholesterol. It can also cause major clogging of arteries, type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems, and was found to increase the risk of heart disease.
    You can also add up the amount of fat in a product (saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated), provided the amounts are listed, and compare the total with the total fat on the label. If they don’t match up, the difference is likely trans fat, especially if partially hydrogenated oil is listed as one of the first ingredients.





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    What are trans fats?

    Trans fats are unsaturated fatty acids formed when vegetable oils are processed and made more solid or into a more stable liquid. This processing is called hydrogenation. Trans fats also occur naturally in low amounts in some foods.

    Trans fats from all sources provide two to four percent of total calories compared with 12 percent from saturated fat and 34 percent from total fat in the American diet. The majority of trans fats come from processed foods. About one-fifth of trans fats in the diet come from animal sources such as meats and dairy products.

    What foods contain trans fats?

    Trans fats are present in variable amounts in a wide range of foods, including most foods made with partially hydrogenated oils, such as baked goods and fried foods, and some margarine products. Trans fats also occur naturally in low amounts in meats and dairy products.

    Why are trans fats in foods?

    Trans fats form when an oil is partially hydrogenated. The process converts oils into a more stable liquid or semi-solid form. Partially hydrogenated oils are used in processed foods because they help produce high quality food products that stay fresh longer and have a more desirable texture. It is not always possible to substitute unhydrogenated oils because of differences in the way the oils work to produce acceptable food products. For example, by partially hydrogenating vegetable oils to make some margarine products, manufacturers can produce a spreadable topping that is lower in saturated fat than butter and can be used immediately upon removal from the refrigerator. Likewise, manufacturers can produce shortenings to make French fries, flaky piecrusts and crispy crackers. Partially hydrogenated oils also resist rancidity (when fats develop an off-flavor) longer than unhydrogenated oils. Foods that contain these oils must list "partially hydrogenated vegetable oil" in the ingredient statement of the food label.

    Are partially hydrogenated oils used for any other reasons?

    Fats and oils containing trans fats are used in place of baking and frying fats that have higher levels of saturated fats. Examples of fats with higher levels of saturated fats include lard, butter and highly saturated vegetable oils like palm, palm kernel and coconut oils. In the mid-1980s, the food industry responded to recommendations from health authorities and interest from consumers to reduce the amount of highly saturated vegetable oils along with animal fats in the food supply. The best, and in many cases the only, available alternative was to reformulate products by substituting partially hydrogenated vegetable oils for the highly saturated fats.

    What is the difference between saturated fats and trans fats?

    Although trans fats are unsaturated, they appear similar to saturated fats in terms of their effect on blood cholesterol levels. Some studies suggest that trans fats may raise LDL- and total blood cholesterol levels much like saturated fats do. Other studies have indicated trans fats have lesser effects on blood cholesterol levels than do saturated fats.

    Will eating a diet high in trans fats increase the risk of heart disease?

    The knowledge that diets high in saturated fats raise LDL-cholesterol and promote atherosclerosis has evolved through a tremendous amount of research. Additional scientific information about trans fats is needed to determine their overall role in cardiovascular disease.

    Research animals fed diets high in trans fats develop almost no atherosclerosis compared to animals fed diets high in saturated fats. Human epidemiological studies have suggested a possible link between cardiovascular disease risk and high intakes of trans fats. Epidemiological studies do not prove a cause-and-effect relationship. Still, these findings generate important hypotheses that require future study.

    Source: International Food Information Council, Washington, D.C.



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    For the first time since the enactment of the National Labeling and Education Act of 1990, the nutrient list on food labels may be expanded to include trans-fatty acids. As the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to consider amending the required nutrients to include trans-fatty acid levels, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recently released a report that reviews the content and effects of trans-fatty acids (1). The proposed amendment and IOM report raises a concern for me as a nutrition professional and scientist: if we oversimplify the facts about trans-fatty acids,. we are misrepresenting the major foundations of our discipline of dietetics, namely, biochemistry and nutritional and food sciences.

    In terms of both structure and function, all trans-fatty acids are not alike (see Figure). If trans-fatty acids are grouped together as one structural entity, as is proposed for labeling by the FDA panel, there exists the possibility for mass confusion and misinformation, especially as we continue to unravel the links of each isomeric structure to physiological effects. With subtle differences in structures, 5ans-fatty acids are likely to have profoundly different physiological functions. For example, structural differences within the class known as conjugated dienoic trans-fatty acids (eg conjugated linoleic acid, CLA) may have profoundly different effects on genomic regulation, metabolic function and physiological outcomes (2). This and other findings regarding the divergent activity of various isomers of conjugated dienoic trans-fatty acids, illustrate the complexity and potential confusion of oversimplifying the nutritional messages concerning trans-fatty acids. While it is proposed that this group of tra ns-fatty acids not be included in the trans-fatty acids required for labeling, this decision is pending.

    In terms of CLA, this group of fatty acids is a naturally occurring trans-fat found in foods from ruminant animal sources and a derivative of the fatty acid linoleic acid. The potential benefits and biological activities of this unique group of fatty acids are still being identified. Research concerning the anticarcinogenic effects of CLA has recently been extended to antiatherogenic properties, anti-diabetic properties, enhanced immune response and positive effects on energy partitioning and growth. We expect further research to find even more significant health benefits being derived from GLA. And, in fact, the American Dietetic Association identified CLA as a component contributing to the functional food properties of beef, lamb and dairy products (3). CLA cannot and should not be categorized in the same way as the man-made trans-fats found in baked goods or snack foods

    Without more answers about the role of various types of trans-fatty acid isomers in health and disease, are we ready to add further confusion to the public's perception about the potentialiy large and complex role this heterogeneous group of fatty acids may play in our health? If trans-fatty acids are lumped together on a food label, or worse yet, combined with saturated fats, there are many risks to our professional identity, including our integrity as practitioners and scientists. But greater than this, we risk misinforming the public who each of us serves as practitioners, teachers, researchers, mentors and messengers. It is important that consumers make knowledgeable decisions to choose foods based on sound, peer-reviewed, replicable and definitive information. In terms of transfatty acids, it is imperative that the content of trans-fatty acids that are associated with increasing risks for cardiovascular diseases (eg elaidic and translinolelaidic acids) be distinguished from those that do not induce ather osclerotic lesions (eg CLA). Furthermore, the designation of trans-fatty acids as separate entities from saturated fatty acids is crucial for pariaying accurate and correct information to consumers. Is this too complex for the public whom we serve? In light of the alternatives, I think not.

    References:

    (1.) Institute of Medicine: Food and Nutrition Board. Letter report on dietary reference intakes for trans fatty acids. In: Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids. National Academy of Sciences, 2002.

    (2.) Belury MA. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid in health: Physiological effects and mechanisms of action. Annu Rev Nutr. 2002;22:505-531.



    Disclaimer: All health, fitness, diet, nutrition & supplement information presented on IronMagazineForums.com's pages is intended as an educational resource and is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice. We do not condone the use of anabolic steroids (AAS), all information about AAS is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Consult your physician or health care professional before performing any of the exercises, or following any diet, nutrition or supplement advice described on this website. As well as any exercise technique or regimen, diet, supplement, etc., particularly if you are pregnant or nursing, or if you are elderly or have chronic or recurring medical conditions. Discontinue any exercise that causes you pain or severe discomfort and consult a medical expert. The statements made about products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (U.S.). They are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any condition or disease. Please consult with your own physician or health care practitioner regarding the suggestions and recommendations made at IronMagazineForums.com. Neither the author of the information, nor the producer, nor distributors of such information make any warranty of any kind in regard to the content of the information presented on this website. Except as specifically stated on this site, neither IronMagazineForums.com, nor any of its authors or other representatives will be liable for damages arising out of, or in connection with the use of this site. This is a comprehensive limitation of liability that applies to all damages of any kind, including (without limitation) compensatory, direct, indirect or consequential damages, loss of data, income or profit, loss of or damage to property and claims of third parties. Sponsors pay for advertising space, we have no affiliation with the companies that have banners displayed on our websites. Please be advised it is your responsibility to check the laws that govern your country, state, or province in regards to items offered by some companies you may read about on this site.

  4. #4
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    Yuck!! Too bad I did an error today. I am carbing up and I ate a box of tricuits. I failed to see that it had Paritally Hydrogenated Soybean Oil. I feel like choking myself. Ahhhh!!!! This sucks. And the crazy thing about it is I was thinking twice about it.
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    U-turn bars also have partially hydrogenated oils......sorry to break it to you guys
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    lol... Havent had one in months. Yaye!!! I stay shy of protien bars.
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    Apart from all the “benefits” and positive motivations that food manufacturer’s ostensibly claim to have motivated their simultaneous mass migration to trans fats (at the precise time the low fat craze hit the country) the public should be highly suspicious that the more likely motivation was to maliciously get around fat labeling laws. It is much the same practice that protein bar manufacturers claimed for very similar benefits as a motivation in the use of alcohol based sugars to circumvent the same labeling laws as they related to carbohydrates when low-carb became the craze. It would only take an elementary statistician to prove this correlation beyond 2 sigmas of standard deviation (98% certainty) and form a basis for legal proof. Soon I predict it will be proven in the courts made up of obese and medically-unfit jurists that this industry practice represented conspirational behavior (if not out and out fraud) and was in fact purposely conceived to evade and deceive the public. Given the current 60% overweight and obesity statistic for the country the cost to date on human quality of life, loss of worker productivity and morbidity rates are likely to be staggering when computed. Also, given that this similar conspirational behavior is still being successfully prosecuted against the tobacco industry in excess of $100 billion in potential awards, we should soon expect to see jury awards in much greater excess for the elements of the much larger food and nutrition markets that behaved thusly. I suspect that the monies involved are as large as Gross Domestic Products and entire National Budgets of many small countries for this grand a market. The prosecuting lawyers are soon to become wealthy beyond belief.
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    Here are some additional interesting links to trans-fats along with some interesting digests.

    “Furthermore, the panel concluded that the only safe intake of trans fat is ‘zero.’ National Academy of Science

    And You Think Saturated Is Bad? "...And a recent study shows that trans fatty acids (TFAs)—a type of fat that is frequently added to commercially processed foods—are probably even more harmful to the heart than had previously been thought. John Hopkins Heart Disease Resource Center


    "...trans fat is a big player in Syndrome X, a cluster of health problems characterized by a beer belly, high blood pressure and out-of-whack blood fats and sugars…. There should be a warning on food made with this stuff like there is on nicotine products. It's that bad for you," says Dr. Jeffrey Aron, a University of California at San Francisco professor of medicine"
    San Francisco Chronicler


    "...Five most deadly foods in the US: Hamburger, Hot-Dogs, French-Fries, Oreo Cookies, Pizza."
    FitAmerica


    The Skinny on Fats - The Lipid Hypothesis

    "...Concerns have been raised for several decades that consumption of trans fatty acids might have contributed to the 20th century epidemic of coronary heart disease."
    TRANS FATTY ACIDS AND CORONARY HEART DISEASE.



    "...On July 9, 2003, FDA issued a regulation requiring manufacturers to list trans fatty acids, or trans fat, on the Nutrition Facts panel of foods and some dietary supplements"
    USFDA


    Grass Roots organization to ban trans fats - currenbtly sueing major food producers
    "Doc, If I had known I was going to live this long I would have taken better care of myself..."

    Est unusquisque faber ipsae suae fortunae.

    We Americans scoff at the likes of African witch doctors yet spend 100's of millions of dollars on fake reducing systems.

    The only regular exercise he gets is stretching the truth.

    His intellect is not replenished, he is only an animal, only sensible in the duller parts...

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    I'm a little confused about something. I thought that any time there was partially hydrogenated oil listed on the ingredients, this means theres trans fat. However I saw this light margarine stuff that had it listed as it's third ingredient yet in large letters on the tub it said free of trans fat. What's up with this?
    Homer: Hey! I saved your life! That egg sandwich could have killed you by cholesterol.
    Lenny: Pfft, forget it, Homer. While it has been established that eggs contain cholesterol, it has not yet been proven conclusively that they actually raise the level of serum cholesterol in the human
    blood stream.


  10. #10
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    Hey folks, if you think this transfat is bad, read your labels. I just checked my fridge and that stuff is in alot of foods. Coffeemate too which I like. I gotta throw it out!
    Partially Hydrogenated is the key word.

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    Yes, that is why I check my labels on EVERYTHING before I buy it.



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    Originally posted by derekisdman
    I'm a little confused about something. I thought that any time there was partially hydrogenated oil listed on the ingredients, this means theres trans fat. However I saw this light margarine stuff that had it listed as it's third ingredient yet in large letters on the tub it said free of trans fat. What's up with this?
    JIF peanut butter will also be trans fat free... eventhough it contains partially hydrogenated oils... it's because they have such a miniscule amount, less than .0005g... they dont' have to list it...
    Are you kidding me????

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    Originally posted by donescobar2000
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    Bulking Lee Priest Style -- haha. Have you seen that free Twinlab CD at GNC? Has multible workouts + diets and stuff used by Lee Priest supposidly. Probally can order off line for free if you're interested.
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    Trans fat is made when manufacturers add hydrogen to vegetable oil-(hydrogenation). Hydrogenation increases the shelf life and flavor stability of foods containing these fats.


    Basically, stay away from cookies, cakes, chips, crackers, frozen dinners, micro-wave popcorn, as well as fast food and chain restaurants.

    Although some food products already have trans fat on the label, food manufacturers have until January 2006 to list it on all their products.

    Some dietary supplements contain trans fat from partially hydrogenated vegetable oil as well as saturated fat or cholesterol. An example would be the protein or energy many of you consume by the truck load.

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    Scary thing is restaurants put it in their food when cooking, so if you are adamant about, ask if they use it and hope you get an honest answer.

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    just eat grilled foods or uncooked and stay away from sauces...
    Are you kidding me????

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