Proposal to split California into 3 states

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Bad Ass
    ADMINISTRATOR
    Prince's Avatar


    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    71,271

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    379
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    917
    Thanked in
    705 Posts
    Rep Points
    2147483647


    Proposal to split California into 3 states

    Proposal to split California into 3 states will be on November ballot
    By ABC7.com staff
    Wednesday, June 13, 2018 02:06PM

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KABC) -- A proposal to divide California into three states will be on the November statewide ballot.

    Backers of CAL 3 said last month they collected and delivered 600,000 signatures to California Secretary of State Alex Padilla's Office, surpassing the 365,000 required by law to qualify for the ballot.

    The proposal calls for three states to be formed:

    Northern California, roughly the Bay Area to the Oregon border; California, which would include six coastal counties, including Los Angeles, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, San Benito and Ventura; and Southern California, which would go from Fresno to San Diego, excluding those six coastal counties.

    If the measure passes, the California Legislature and U.S. Congress would still have to approve it.

    Article IV of the U.S. Constitution discusses the process for admitting new states to the federal union. Specifically, section three of Article IV says if Congress approves a measure to create a new state, the measure would be presented to the president for approval or veto. In the event of a veto, the measure may be approved over the president's objections with a two-thirds vote of the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives.

    Four U.S. states were admitted to the union after being split from an existing state: Kentucky, Maine, Vermont and West Virginia. The last such split - West Virginia's split from Virginia - occurred in 1863 during the Civil War.

    Source: http://abc7.com/politics/plan-to-spl...allot/3595717/

  2. #2
    Registered User
    botamico's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    635

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    138
    Thanked in
    118 Posts
    Rep Points
    27012297

    Now that should be interesting to watch unfolds. Different parts of California have different views. Split them up and see which part is governed the best.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    ELITE MEMBER


    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    11,322

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    17
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    42
    Thanked in
    41 Posts
    Rep Points
    519604859


    I'm curious about how the states would work together afterward. The water for the LA area comes from that aqueduct system in the north. What happens if North Cal decides to keep their water?

  4. #4
    Bad Ass
    ADMINISTRATOR
    Prince's Avatar


    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    71,271

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    379
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    917
    Thanked in
    705 Posts
    Rep Points
    2147483647


    I think they should break it into two states, north and south.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    .45 ACP rules!


    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Michigan
    Age
    49
    Posts
    5,966

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    138
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    89
    Thanked in
    62 Posts
    Rep Points
    2147483647


    Let southern California keep their illegals and crime.
    Some mornings, it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps. - Emo Phillips

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    ELITE MEMBER


    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    11,322

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    17
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    42
    Thanked in
    41 Posts
    Rep Points
    519604859


    This one issue could make splitting California into three states virtually impossible

    Read more here: https://www.sacbee.com/latest-news/a...#storylink=cpy

    Splitting California into three new states would scramble nearly every segment of government that touches residents' lives, from taxes to Medi-Cal to driver's licenses.

    New agencies would have to be created to operate prisons, highways and universities. CalPERS, CalSTRS, Cal Fire and the California Highway Patrol, to name a few, would have to be reconfigured and replaced.

    But of all the gargantuan tasks facing Californians should they choose to divide themselves by three ? a proposal that has qualified for the November ballot ? none is arguably more daunting than carving up the state's water supply.

    California has spent more than a century crafting one of the world's most elaborate ? and interdependent ? networks for storing, allocating and delivering its water. Billions of dollars have been poured into reservoirs, pumping stations and aqueducts, mostly to move water from the rainy north to the arid and densely populated south.

    The entire apparatus is governed by two state agencies, one federal agency, hundreds of local districts and a convoluted pecking order of water rights, contracts and court rulings.
    Separating this intricate and almost hopelessly tangled web into three workable parts? Go ahead and try.

    "In a word, it would be a nightmare from a water standpoint," said Sacramento water lawyer Kevin O'Brien. "You have got multiple questions about how the different water-related assets would be divided. That would include water rights, reservoirs, conveyance facilities like the California Aqueduct. ... How exactly you would carve those assets up would be extremely complicated."

    The plan to split up California is the brainchild of venture capitalist Tim Draper, who argues that the state is so large that it has become ungovernable. If the plan is approved by voters and Congress gives its OK ? hardly a sure thing ? California would be replaced by Northern California, which would include Sacramento and the Bay Area; Southern California, covering much of the San Joaquin Valley along with San Diego and Orange counties; and the state known simply as California, a slimmed-down coastal area stretching from Monterey to Los Angeles.

    The implications for water supply are staggering. For instance: Could the new state of Northern California, blessed with ample water and the mechanism for delivering it as far away as San Diego, decide to shut off the spigot?

    Probably not, legal experts say, but no one really knows for sure. It's no secret that many Northern Californians resent the fact that much of the region's water winds up irrigating the south part of the state and would love to withhold or curtail deliveries.
    "People in Northern California have always been very protective of water and water rights and always will be," said David Guy of the Northern California Water Association, an alliance of mostly agricultural water agencies in the Sacramento Valley. "We don't know what that means if you start splitting the state."

    At the very least, the idea of a standoff with Northern California is unnerving for people like Jeff Kightlinger, general manager of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. Metropolitan's 19 million customers get a quarter of their water from Northern California through a decades-old contract with the State Water Project.

    "I would think you would have to somehow respect the pre-existing rights and contracts," said Kightlinger, whose own agency would be split in two by the Draper initiative.
    If the new Northern California tried playing hardball, "we would sue them," Kightlinger said.

    Right now, every drop of water in California is property of the state; it doesn't belong to one region or another. If the state gets dissolved into three parts, the question of ownership obviously becomes complicated. But water-law experts agree with Kightlinger: It's doubtful Northern California could simply hoard its supply and refuse to do business with the other two states.


    Even so, the prospect of chaos looms.

    "Every time you turn around, there's a new question that faces you, and none of them have ever been addressed before," said Barton Thompson, a water law expert at Stanford University.
    Draper says his "Cal 3" plan would remedy much of what ails the current state, including its almost chronic water shortages. But so far he hasn't offered many details about how California's water woes would be alleviated.

    "Cal 3 would allow for innovative solutions to California's current water crisis that empowers each region to cooperate more effectively than the current state system," his initiative's website says. Calls to Draper's public relations team went unanswered.

    Of course, states can and do cooperate with one another, even on water issues. California shares the Colorado River with six other states. But the arrangement, originally brokered in 1922 by then-U.S. Commerce Secretary and future President Herbert Hoover, is more of an uneasy truce than an olive-branched armistice, and the states periodically have engaged in major legal and political tussles over the river.

    Two major systems move much of California's water from north to south: the federal government's Central Valley Project and California's own State Water Project. They work in concert with one another, especially in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the hub of the two systems. How they would be affected by Draper's plan is unclear. But they have so many moving parts that dividing up the state seems like a huge complicating factor.

    Look at the State Water Project. Built in the 1960s by Gov. Pat Brown, the project takes water largely stored in Lake Oroville in Butte County and runs it down the Sacramento River to the Delta. From there it's pumped via the 444-mile California Aqueduct to parts of the Bay Area, a few coastal regions like San Luis Obispo County, the southern San Joaquin Valley and the vast urban stretches of Southern California.

    It's complicated enough as it is. Now the water would have to wend its way from the new Northern California, home to Oroville and the Delta pumps, to the mostly inland state called Southern California and the coastal entity known as California.
    "It's fraught with politics. Just imagine Southern California and Northern California, two new states, trying to figure out how much each would get," said Thompson, the Stanford law professor. "There's no easy way of doing it."

  7. #7
    Registered User
    heckler7's Avatar


    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    ventura, ca
    Posts
    7,446

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    273
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    377
    Thanked in
    253 Posts
    Rep Points
    2147483647


    the state is so big and there are too many issues that dont get attention due to other issues being more important to the politicians. in my opinion its like asking someone in savanah Ga worried about flooding to care about bridge repair from NJ to NY
    Aussies and Philadelphians are the only people here

  8. #8
    H-AS Board Rep
    BOARD REP
    BadGas's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    East of the Pacific. West of the Atlantic.
    Posts
    2,867

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    452
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    215
    Thanked in
    186 Posts
    Rep Points
    120651955


    3 states would almost guarantee that at least one of those states votes Red..

    Unbeatable brand new price list and insane VIP sales
    Please contact us regarding order and vip details.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    heckler7's Avatar


    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    ventura, ca
    Posts
    7,446

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    273
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    377
    Thanked in
    253 Posts
    Rep Points
    2147483647


    Quote Originally Posted by BadGas View Post
    3 states would almost guarantee that at least one of those states votes Red..
    I think only the coast would vote dem, the rest would be rep, most of california is country and farms
    Aussies and Philadelphians are the only people here

  10. #10
    Newbie


    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    2

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Rep Points
    100

    Quote Originally Posted by heckler7 View Post
    I think only the coast would vote dem, the rest would be rep, most of california is country and farms
    My thoughts exactly!

  11. #11
    Newbie


    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Gender
    Male
    Posts
    2

    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Rep Points
    100

    Quote Originally Posted by BadGas View Post
    3 states would almost guarantee that at least one of those states votes Red..
    I'm sure about it!

Similar Threads

  1. 2008 NPC California & IFBB California Pro Figure
    By Prince in forum Muscle Central
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-27-2011, 12:57 PM
  2. 2008 NPC California & IFBB California Pro Figure
    By Prince in forum Muscle Central
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-10-2008, 04:10 AM
  3. Proposal Rejection
    By shiznit2169 in forum Anything Goes
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-23-2008, 05:17 AM
  4. Proposal. Is it happening
    By Tough Old Man in forum Anything Goes
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 04-24-2006, 02:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Copyright© 2001-2018 IronMag® Bodybuilding Forums