No trump - russian collusion ... What say you ???

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  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaphod View Post
    Slaves were already here when Europeans arrived. Indians regularly captured people from other tribes and used them as slaves. The Mexicans did the same thing before they were called Mexicans.
    In 1619, Dutch traders brought African slaves taken from a Spanish ship to Jamestown; in North America, theAfricanswere also generally treated as indentured servants in the early colonial era. Several colonial colleges held enslaved people as workers and relied on them to operate.learn your history

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaphod View Post
    What are you complaining about? Without Europeans you'd still be living in wigwam somewhere getting ass raped by a rival tribe that put up a better fight. You say you're a badass fighter (you're still a keyboard warrior) but you're descended from a people who ultimately lost. If they were all like you it's no surprise they did.
    California was lost to the USA in the US Mexican War of 1846. Before the war, it belonged to the Mexicans. But before the Mexicans, it was colonised by the Spaniards. And before the Spaniards, it was the land of the native Americans. And before the native Americans, well . . . history is sketchy there.

    The war was provoked by the US' annexation of Texas. Mexico was unwilling to negotiate; so the war began. The US gained California, Arizona, New Mexico, the Rio Grande boundary for Texas, and portions of Utah, Nevada, and Colorado.


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  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaphod View Post
    Slaves were already here when Europeans arrived. Indians regularly captured people from other tribes and used them as slaves. The Mexicans did the same thing before they were called Mexicans.
    The earliest record of African and Native American contact occurred in April 1502, when Spanish explorers brought an African slave with them and encountered a Native American band.[45][bettersourceneeded]Thereafter, in the early colonial days, Native Americans interacted with enslaved Africans and African Americans in every way possible; Native Americans were enslaved along with Africans, and both often worked with Europeanindenturedlaborers.[24][13][46]"They worked together, lived together in communal quarters, produced collective recipes for food, shared herbal remedies, myths and legends, and in the end they intermarried."[24][47]Because both races were non-Christian, Europeans considered them other and inferior to Europeans. They worked to make enemies of the two groups. In some areas, Native Americans began to slowly absorb white culture, and in time some Native American tribes came to own slaves.[2][3]




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  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swiper View Post
    i believe in the Easter bunny
    We know what we?re taught in mainstream media and in schools is made up. What?s the Wampanoag version of what happened?

    Yeah, it was made up. It was Abraham Lincoln who used the theme of Pilgrims and Indians eating happily together. He was trying to calm things down during the Civil War when people were divided. It was like a nice unity story.

    So it was a political thing?

    Yes, it was public relations. It?s kind of genius, in a way, to get people to sit down and eat dinner together. Families were divided during the Civil War.

    So what really happened?

    We madea treaty. The leader of our nation at the time?Yellow Feather Oasmeequin [Massasoit] made a treaty with (John) Carver [the first governor of the colony]. They elected an official while they were still on the boat. They had their charter. They were still under the jurisdiction of the king [of England]?at least that?s what they told us. So they couldn?t make a treaty for a boatload of people so they made a treaty between two nations?England and the Wampanoag Nation.

    What did the treaty say?

    It basically said we?d let them be there and we would protect them against any enemies and they would protect us from any of ours. [The2011 Native American $1 coincommemorates the 1621 treaty between the Wampanoag tribe and the Pilgrims of Plymouth colony.] It was basically an I?ll watch your back, you watch mine? agreement. Later on we collaborated on jurisdictions and creating a system so that we could live together.

    What?s the Mashpee version of the 1621 meal?

    You?ve probably heard the story of how Squanto assisted in their planting of corn? So this was their first successful harvest and they were celebrating that harvest and planning a day of their own thanksgiving. And it?s kind of like what some of the Arab nations do when they celebrate by shooting guns in the air. So this is what was going on over there at Plymouth. They were shooting guns and canons as a celebration, which alerted us because we didn?t know who they were shooting at. So Massasoit gathered up some 90 warriors and showed up at Plymouth prepared to engage, if that was what was happening, if they were taking any of our people. They didn?t know. It was a fact-finding mission.

    When they arrived it was explained through a translator that they were celebrating the harvest, so we decided to stay and make sure that was true, because we?d seen in the other landings?[Captain John] Smith, even theVikingshad been here?so we wanted to make sure so we decided to camp nearby for a few days. During those few days, the men went out to hunt and gather food?deer, ducks, geese, and fish. There are 90 men here and at the time I think there are only 23 survivors of that boat, the Mayflower, so you can imagine the fear. You have armed Natives who are camping nearby. They [the colonists] were always vulnerable to the new land, new creatures, even the trees?there were no such trees in England at that time. People forget they had just landed here and this coastline looked very different from what it looks like now. And their culture?new foods, they were afraid to eat a lot of things. So they were very vulnerable and we did protect them, not just support them, we protected them. You can see throughout their journals that they were always nervous and, unfortunately, when they were nervous they were very aggressive.

    So the Pilgrims didn?t invite the Wampanoags to sit down and eat turkey and drink some beer?

    [laughs] Ah, no. Well, let?s put it this way. People did eat together [but not in what is portrayed as ?the first Thanksgiving]. It was our homeland and our territory and we walked all through their villages all the time. The differences in how they behaved, how they ate, how they prepared things was a lot for both cultures to work with each other. But in those days, it was sort of like today when you go out on a boat in the open sea and you see another boat and everyone is waving and very friendly?it?s because they?re vulnerable and need to rely on each other if something happens. In those days, the English really needed to rely on us and, yes, they were polite as best they could be, but they regarded us as savages nonetheless.

    So you did eat together sometimes, but not at the legendary Thanksgiving meal.

    No. We were there for days. And this is another thing: We give thanks more than once a year in formal ceremony for different season, for the green corn thanksgiving, for the arrival of certain fish species, whales, the first snow, our new year in May?there are so many ceremonies and I think most cultures have similar traditions. It?s not a foreign concept and I think human beings who recognize greater spirit then they would have to say thank you in some formal way.

    What are Mashpee Wampanoags taught about Thanksgiving now?

    Most of us are taught about the friendly Indians and the friendly Pilgrims and people sitting down and eating together. They really don?t go into any depth about that time period and what was going on in 1620. It was a whole different mindset. There was always focus on food because people had to work hard to go out and forage for food, not the way it is now. I can remember being inOklahomaamongst a lot of different tribal people when I was in junior college andThanksgivingwas coming around and I couldn?t come home?it was too far and too expensive?and people were talking about, Thanksgiving, and, yeah, the Indians! And I said, yeah, we?re the Wampanoags. They didn?t know! We?re not even taught what kind of Indians, Hopefully, in the future, at least for Americans, we do need to get a lot brighter about other people.




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