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Aerobic vs. Anaerobic Activity which is best. Find out here.

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  1. #1
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    Aerobic vs. Anaerobic Activity which is best. Find out here.






    Anaerobic means "requiring no oxygen." In exercise physiology, the term refers to activities that require a high energy expenditure but last for a shorter duration than aerobic exercises. Quick, explosive running sprints qualify as anaerobic exercise, whereas longer, steadily paced jogs are aerobic.

    The preferred fuel for anaerobic metabolism is creatine phosphate, produced in the sarcoplasm of the cells, or carbohydrates used in the lactic acid system. Its advantage is that it produces a very high intensity, almost 95 percent of your maximum output. Its disadvantage is that you can become fatigued in less than 90 seconds and go only go for a short distance.

    Aerobic exercise uses carbohydrates, fats or protein, all used in the presence of oxygen within the mitochondria of the cells. The power it generates is moderate, but it takes a very long time to fatigue the system.

    Examples of Aerobic Exercise:
    Brisk Walking
    Running
    Cycling
    Swimming
    Dancing
    Racquetball
    Basketball
    Football
    Sex
    Baseball

    Examples of Anaerobic Exercise:
    Weight Lifting
    Sit Ups
    Push Ups
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    Football is actually anaerobic...as are many sports you would think are chiefly aerobic...soccer, hockey, etc. At least that is how they are classified. You would think at least soccer is aerobic, but according to many sources it's not.
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    I can see how Football can be Anaerobic.
    Don't hate the player, hate the game!http://pages.prodigy.net/rogerlori1/...the%20wave.GIF
    Before you talk about what you want - appreciate what you have.

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    Heart rate is key

    Another general guidline is your heart rate. If you are maintaining it above approx. 75-80% of your max, then you are in the anaerobic range, in the 50-75% range is aerobic, no matter what the type of activity you are doing, but certain sports do dictate the heart rate range.
    If you are training weights, you can specify which range you are training in: short rest between sets should put most in the anaerobic range, longer rests in the aerobic range and will of course allow for longer sessions.

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    Football, soccer... etc... are not exactly anaerobic I think. They are like the middle ground between aerobic and anaerobic. Probably employing both methods for energy.

    Sprinting is the same... which is one of the reasons that sprinters are alot more muscled than long distance. Well, that and the fact that they only need lug their bodies... unlike long distance runners who are in a more catabolic state and their bodies know it doesnt pay to be muscley.

    Isnt CP utilized after ATP is already exhausted to donate phosphate to the ADP to turn it back into ADP? Then after CP and ATP are depleted the body turns to glycogen... which doesnt transfer energy as quickly as CP does. Either way, ATP and CP last about 10 seconds I believe. Or about as long as a quick set. Either way, once your body turns to glycogen for fuel you're going to start building up lactic acid, which is its by-product.

    maddog, where'd yo get the figures that 50-75% is aerobic. I'm not sure about that... I'd say more along the lines if you can do more than 16-20 reps or so its aerobic. Which could be 75% of your 1RM, but its not for me! Either way

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