rolled oats vs "old-fashioned" rolled oats

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  1. #1
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    rolled oats vs "old-fashioned" rolled oats






    Well I just got back from my local co-op. I went to get some oats since I ran out of my usual Quaker Oat Old Fashioned you can get in any grocery store (not the quick-cooking instant).

    The co-op had 3 different choices:
    -Old Fashioned Rolled Oats
    -Rolled Oats
    -Quick Cooking Oats

    My guess is they are in order from least -> most processed. Am I right?
    I went with the Old Fashioned Rolled Oats. One of the workers said she thinks it is just a different sized roller used than on the regular rolled oats. I thought thicker oats = longer digestion time = best. Let me know if I made the right choice. Also, out of those, which is the same as your standard old fashioned quaker oats? Thanks

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    Yup. You are correct.

    Although sometimes rolled oats and old fashioned rolled oats are the same thing, usually the old fashioned are processed so they are rolled thicker - and these are therefore digested more slowly than the thinly rolled oats.

    In regards to quaker oats - I have never seen them, but I would imagine that they would be either rolled oats, or (as their name indicates) old fashioned rolled oats.
    ~


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    There are also steel-cut oats.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Emma-Leigh
    Yup. You are correct.

    Although sometimes rolled oats and old fashioned rolled oats are the same thing, usually the old fashioned are processed so they are rolled thicker - and these are therefore digested more slowly than the thinly rolled oats.
    thanks for your answer emma but this part confused me. you say that the old fashioned are processed yet they are digested slower? Doesn't it usually work the opposite way? But to get a concrete answer, the thicker oats are better right?

    I made them earlier today and they took about 4-5 minutes to cook rather than the quaker which take around 2-2.5 min to cook

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    Quote Originally Posted by cpush
    thanks for your answer emma but this part confused me. you say that the old fashioned are processed yet they are digested slower? Doesn't it usually work the opposite way? But to get a concrete answer, the thicker oats are better right?
    Yes, old fashioned oats ARE processed... But they are 'less' processed.

    Unless you go out into a field, take an oat plant and eat the grain right there - it has to have been processed in some way.

    So in the case of Old-fashioned rolled oats they are cleaned, the hull is removed and then they are rolled and steamed. The difference between these are regular oats is that they are rolled to be a thicker end product...

    And regular oats are not as processed as some other oats... With your quick oats being rolled finer again, and also steamed a second time and cut into smaller peices.

    Steel cut oats (irish oats) are one step UP from old fashioned. In this, the oats are not even steamed and rolled - they are just cut into 'chunks'.

    Then, above that again, you have the whole oats that simply have had the outer husk removed.

    I made them earlier today and they took about 4-5 minutes to cook rather than the quaker which take around 2-2.5 min to cook
    Yeah - they will take longer because they are thicker.

    Steel cut oats take longer again (I usually soak them in boiling water for 1 hr before cooking them)...
    ~


  6. #6
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    Interesting link I stumbled across:
    http://www.karenskitchen.com/a/recipe_oat.htm

    (from www.quakeroatmeal.com)

    Frequently Asked Questions:

    What is the difference between Quaker Old Fashioned Oatmeal and Quick Quaker Oats?
    Quaker Old Fashioned Oats are whole oat groats that are rolled to flatten them. They contain all parts of the oat grain including the bran, endosperm and germ portion. Quick Quaker Oats are made the same way but are simply cut into slightly smaller pieces so they cook faster.
    How does Instant Quaker Oatmeal differ from Old Fashioned Quaker Oats and Quick Quaker Oats?
    Instant Quaker Oats use the exact same oats, only they are rolled a little bit thinner and cut finer so that they cook very quickly. Additionally, they have some flavoring ingredients added.

    (from McCann's Irish Oatmeal website)

    Steel-cut Oatcakes

    Nutrition Information

    Serves 8
    Serving size per biscuit
    Calories 105
    Total Fat (g) 5.6
    Saturated Fat (g) 0.8
    Sodium (g) 0.2
    Total Carbohydrate (g) 11.3
    Protein (g) 2.5

    Ingredients

    1 cup McCann’s Steel Cut Oatmeal
    2 tablespoons Olive Oil
    Good Pinch Sea Salt
    3 tablespoons chopped fresh Parsley
    8 tablespoons Boiling Water


    Preparation


    1. Put the oatmeal, oil, salt and parsley into a food processor.
    2. Blend until all the parsley is chopped and everything is combined.
    3. With the motor running, pour in the boiling water and blend for about a minute.
    4. Allow to stand for about 10 minutes, then blend again until mixture comes together and looks sticky and thick.
    5. Gather dough into a ball and place on a floured board or work top.
    6. Dust with some flour and roll out thinly. Cut into oatcakes with a 2" cutter.
    7. Place on a greased baking sheet and bake in a preheated oven at 350 degrees.
    8. Bake for 15 minutes or until lightly coloured.
    9. Cool on a wire tray. When cold, store in an airtight container.
    10. Serve with cheese.

    Irish Oatmeal Risotto
    Serves 6-8

    Nutrition Information

    Serves 8
    Serving size 1 serving
    Calories 220
    Total Fat (g) 11.1
    Saturated Fat (g) 2.7
    Sodium (g) 0.2
    Total Carbohydrate (g) 22.7
    Protein (g) 7.2

    Ingredients
    2 cups McCann’s Steel Cut Irish Oatmeal
    3 tablespoons olive oil (or butter)
    1/4 cup minced shallots
    2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
    5-6 cups hot strong unsalted defatted chicken or beef broth
    2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
    1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
    1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
    salt & pepper to taste
    pinch saffron for color (optional)


    Preparation
    Heat olive oil in heavy saucepan over medium high heat. When hot, add shallots and garlic. Sauté for 3 minutes. Stir in the oats and sauté for about 5 minutes or until oats are glistening. Begin by adding the hot broth 1/2 cup at a time (and saffron if used), stirring continuously, until each 1/2 cup has been absorbed. When oats have absorbed enough broth to be a rich, creamy texture with a bit of bite left, remove from heat. Stir in parsley, lemon juice, cheese, salt and pepper.
    Serve hot.
    Last edited by aggies1ut; 02-15-2006 at 09:55 PM.

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    thanks emma you cleared it all up!!

    only problem with these oats is that since they have to cook so long they bubble up and almost spill over.. i need a bigger bowl

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    You can fix this by pouring boiling water over then am letting them soak for 30 mins before you cook them... Then they just take a few minutes as per normal.
    ~


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    awesome emma! I'll try it tonight.

    one last question (sorry!)- if they are soaked and cooked, they will be "mushier" does that increase the GI and digestion speed? Is the more you cook it sort of like processing it more? Can cooking longer affect the GI/digestion speed of the oats? Or does cooking consistency not matter?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpush
    awesome emma! I'll try it tonight.

    one last question (sorry!)- if they are soaked and cooked, they will be "mushier" does that increase the GI and digestion speed? Is the more you cook it sort of like processing it more? Can cooking longer affect the GI/digestion speed of the oats? Or does cooking consistency not matter?
    Don't worry about the GI that much... The only times it is important is:
    1. when you are talking about food immediately before, during or immediately after a training session...
    2. if you are eating a carb, and only a carb, first thing in the morning on an empty stomach
    3. if you are diabetic

    At all other times, because you will be mixing the carb with some protein, healthy fats and fibre... And because you will also have food in your intestines from your prior meals.... And because you are making healthy choices anyway (natural foods high in vitamins and minerals).... And because you are NOT diabetic - then GI is not hugely important...

    But to answer your question - Oats are odd in that they have a type of starch in them that is pretty resistant to cooking - so cooking them doesn't change the GI all that much.

    If you are REALLY worried about GI and speed of digestion then you can eat rolled oats without cooking them at all (because they have been 'pre-steamed')...

    But soaking them will help them to be digested with more ease... And you could just do this as well if you are not going to cook them. Simply pour over the boiling water, leave it for 30 minutes to soak, then stir in your protein and your fats and this would be fine.

    You can do the same thing but use cold water, cinammon and a squeeze of lemon juice and then leave it in the fridge overnight to soak. They absorb the flavours and soften.. Or you can use yoghurt or skim milk and soak them overnight. Then you simply mix in some protein and some fats in the morning (eg: add some whey, top with fruit and sprinkle over some walnuts).

    Makes a yummy meal!
    ~


  11. #11
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    thanks emma, you have been most helpful.

    ps - I understand worrying about GI during/after workouts (so food gets to muscles quickly) and diabetes (insulin spikes) but why should one worry in the morning on an empty stomach?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cpush
    ps - I understand worrying about GI during/after workouts (so food gets to muscles quickly) and diabetes (insulin spikes) but why should one worry in the morning on an empty stomach?
    Because this is when they actually test the GI - on starving uni students, first thing in the morning, empty stomach. Then they feed then 25 or 50g of CARBS from the given food they are testing (eg: some student may just have to eat 86.5g of strawberry jam). Then they test blood glucose over the next 2 hrs to see what happens.

    It is a REALLY artificial environment.... And so once you remove all these factors and you add in variables, the usefulness of the actual GI decreases substantially.
    ~


  13. #13
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    try Muscle Milk and oats in an post, post workout meal. It's a amazing.
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