NapsGear.net


Free your Hamstrings, Improve your Performance, and Save your Knees

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Registered User
    fUnc17's Avatar


    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    1,857
    Rep Points
    195351

    Free your Hamstrings, Improve your Performance, and Save your Knees






    A surprising number of problems arise from tight hamstrings and, given the frequency of knee injuries among athletes and dancers, it's obvious that the methods used to keep them free could be better. This article presents a more effective way to free your hamstrings, improve your performance, and avoid injury. A Look at Your Hamstrings

    The hamstrings are the muscles that run from behind and below your knees up the backs of your thighs to your "sitbones". Soft tissue injuries, knee pain, torn menisci (the cartilage pads in your knees that cushion the bones), chondromalacia patelli (painful wearing of the cartilage behind the kneecaps), and poor posture often come from tight hamstrings. Tight hamstrings can prevent you from reaching full leg extension or from bending over completely. If you can't touch your toes or if you feel more comfortable slouching than sitting up straight, your hamstrings are probably tight.

    There are actually three hamstring muscles on the back of each thigh, two on the inside and one on the outside. They do several things. In addition to bending the knees, they help control the alternate forward-and-backward movements of walking and stability against twisting forces at the knee when you turn a corner or roller skate. They also position the menisci in the knees by means of fibers (of the biceps femoris) that pass into the knee joint.

    Tight hamstrings contribute to swayback by pulling the knees behind the body's vertical centerline (i.e., locking the knees). The whole body sways forward, accentuating the spinal curves. If the outer hamstrings are tighter than the inner ones, the lower leg rotates toe-outward. This twist in the knee joint contributes to knee pain, to knee injuries, and to ungainly movement. Finally, when standing, bent knees trigger tension in the muscles on the front of the thigh, the quadriceps muscles, to prevent your knees from buckling. If you keep your knees bent all the time, the patella, or kneecap, which is embedded in the tendon of the quadriceps muscles, continuously grinds against the front surface of the knee joint and may become irritated.

    As you can see, hamstring tension has far-reaching effects on movement, balance, and the health of joints.

    Why Stretching Doesn't Work for Long

    Knowing all this, athletes and dancers attempt to stretch their hamstrings. "Attempt" is the correct word because stretching produces only limited and temporary effects, which is one reason why so many athletes (and dancers) suffer pulled hamstrings and knee injuries.

    As anyone who has had someone stretch their hamstrings for them knows, forcible stretching is also usually a painful ordeal. In addition, stretching the hamstrings disrupts their natural coordination with the quadriceps muscles, which is why ones legs feel shaky after stretching the hamstrings.

    Fortunately, there is a more effective way to manage hamstring tension than by stretching. To understand how it works, one must first recognize that hamstrings that need stretching are usually holding tension -- that is, they are actively contracting. In that case, the person is holding them tense by habit, unconsciously. Oddly enough, if one tries to relax them, one is likely to find that one cannot; one may then assume that the muscles are completely relaxed and need stretching. You may not realize that those muscles are contracting "on automatic" due to postural habits stored in your central nervous system. Any attempt to stretch them simply re-triggers the impulse to re-contract them to restore the sense of what is "familiar". That is why hamstrings (and other muscles) tighten up again so soon after stretching or massage. Better results come by changing the person's "set-point" -- their sense of what "relaxed" is.

    What Works Better

    To change the set-point requires more than stretching or massaging; it requires a learning process that affects the brain, which controls the muscular system. Such a learning process is referred to in some circles as "somatic education". Somatic education systematically uses special coordination patterns to improve awareness and control the tension of the muscular system. Significant results come relatively quickly, and when they do, the benefits are second nature and require no special attention in daily life.

    The following coordination pattern, developed by Thomas Hanna, Ph.D., a pioneer in the field of somatic education, will show you. You may want to save this page so that you can try it on your own. Have someone read the instructions to you and follow along.



    http://www.somatics.com/pdf/somagic,_hamstrings.pdf
    www.monmouthkettlebells.blogspot.com
    AJ Oliva RKC, FMS
    Central NJ

  2. #2
    Registered User
    fUnc17's Avatar


    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    1,857
    Rep Points
    195351

    Also, another great article on this subject from a chirpractor's viewpoint.

    http://chetday.com/backchronicpain.htm
    www.monmouthkettlebells.blogspot.com
    AJ Oliva RKC, FMS
    Central NJ

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Brutus_G's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    5,011
    Rep Points
    3838647

    I just tried it and my knees feel like they are lubricated with butter. Great find func i'll do these every day.

  4. #4
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,410
    Rep Points
    2003272

    you find the best fucking articles lol, I did one shitty rep of this, and my knee feels a little better

  5. #5
    I am Rollo Tomassee..
    ELITE MEMBER
    AKIRA's Avatar


    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    10,500
    Rep Points
    68710456

    Quote Originally Posted by Brutus_G View Post
    I just tried it and my knees feel like they are lubricated with butter. Great find func i'll do these every day.
    Tried what? The stretches in the 2nd reply (the link)?

    Ive dont a stretch similiar to the towel around the foot. I just use a belt instead. Its some tough shit, but breathing REALLY helps with the tightness.
    6' 203lbs (12-10-12)
    Bench 365 (12/3)
    Weighted Pullups 80lbs 3x3 (3/19)
    Squat 370
    Deadlift after herniation 385lbs 3x3 (3/17)
    NASM certified 2/06
    Journal

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Brutus_G's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    5,011
    Rep Points
    3838647

    Quote Originally Posted by AKIRA View Post
    Tried what? The stretches in the 2nd reply (the link)?

    Ive dont a stretch similiar to the towel around the foot. I just use a belt instead. Its some tough shit, but breathing REALLY helps with the tightness.
    Yep the 2nd reply.

  7. #7
    SHRUG LIKE YOU MEAN IT
    MODERATOR
    Gazhole's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    11,121
    Rep Points
    187047969

    Thats brilliant. Good one, fUnc!
    http://www.getlifting.info

    Disclaimer: All health, fitness, diet, nutrition, anabolic steroid & supplement information posted here is intended for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice from a medical doctor. We do not condone the use of anabolic steroids (AAS), all information about AAS is for educational and entertainment purposes only. If you choose to use AAS it's your responsibility to know the laws of the country that you live in. Consult your physician or health care professional before performing any of the exercises, or following any diet, nutrition or supplement advice described on this website.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Lost Grizzly's Avatar


    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Near Food
    Posts
    301
    Rep Points
    11494304

    Tight Hams can also cause lower back pain as well. I have suffered from sciatica and have learned to keep my hams loose to keep the pain away.

    Your sciatica nerves run down from your lower back towards your knees through your hams. If your hams are tight they can pull on your sciatica nerves and cause pain as if you have a bulging disc.

  9. #9
    Moderator
    MODERATOR
    Dale Mabry's Avatar


    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Elsewhere
    Posts
    15,578
    Rep Points
    247492144

    Good alternative theory. Personally, I prefer stretching as it is good for recovery, but am always interested in alternatives. I agree you shouldn't just stretch the hammies, a comprehensive stretching strategy is key if you are going to even bother with stretching.
    If sense were common, everyone would have it.

    4/2007-Current 75th Ranked most popular image 1 spot behind Prince's bulge...

    Check out my world famous Bob Loblaw's Law Blog at http://www.synergyhw.blogspot.com/...Just kidding, it's a health and wellness blog.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    ELITE MEMBER
    assassin's Avatar


    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    egypt/cairo
    Posts
    2,355
    Rep Points
    2796119

    nice article I have this problem when trying to stretch my hamstring .... since I'm not using my computer I've sent a pm to myself with the link to keep it for reading later ........ good job func you have provided me with several great articles.

  11. #11
    I am Rollo Tomassee..
    ELITE MEMBER
    AKIRA's Avatar


    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    10,500
    Rep Points
    68710456

    Quote Originally Posted by Dale Mabry View Post
    Good alternative theory. Personally, I prefer stretching as it is good for recovery, but am always interested in alternatives. I agree you shouldn't just stretch the hammies, a comprehensive stretching strategy is key if you are going to even bother with stretching.
    But what IS an alternative? The first article just states that stretching isnt enough. I want suggestions!
    6' 203lbs (12-10-12)
    Bench 365 (12/3)
    Weighted Pullups 80lbs 3x3 (3/19)
    Squat 370
    Deadlift after herniation 385lbs 3x3 (3/17)
    NASM certified 2/06
    Journal

  12. #12
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    3,410
    Rep Points
    2003272






    Quote Originally Posted by AKIRA View Post
    But what IS an alternative? The first article just states that stretching isnt enough. I want suggestions!
    you have to go to this site, and then scroll down http://www.somatics.com/pdf/somagic,_hamstrings.pdf

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 33
    Last Post: 08-04-2011, 01:11 PM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 06-30-2011, 08:01 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-27-2011, 10:27 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-10-2009, 08:36 AM
  5. First NO Product Clinically Proven to Improve Performance
    By Prince in forum Bodybuilding Gossip
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-18-2009, 05:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
DISABLED END -->