Dextrose over plain Sugar

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Registered User
    musclepump's Avatar


    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    America! Fuck yeah!
    Posts
    6,671
    Rep Points
    9223879

    Dextrose over plain Sugar

    Can anyone give me the scientific rundown on why dextrose (glucose) is preferred over plain table sugar when added to PWO shakes? It has to do with dextrose being a monosaccharide and cane sugar being a disaccharide, correct? Whereas cane sugar has to be broken down to glucose (thus dextrose) before use?
    Let's all join together and SPEAK ENGLISH IN AMERICA.


  2. #2
    Donkey Punch Elite
    El Hefe's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    107
    Rep Points
    10

    because its less complex, so it is absorbed into the blood faster, which helps your body replenish lost glycogen stores quicker
    Last edited by El Hefe; 01-09-2007 at 06:20 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    ELITE MEMBER


    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    18,563
    Rep Points
    66150743

    I think Dextrose is pure glucose, where as Table suger is a combination of Glucose and Fructose.

  4. #4
    Creator of Chaos
    MODERATOR
    juggernaut's Avatar


    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    11,423
    Rep Points
    319172539

    Just use oats.
    Disclaimer: All health, fitness, diet, nutrition, anabolic steroid & supplement information posted here is intended for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice from a medical doctor. We do not condone the use of anabolic steroids (AAS), all information about AAS is for educational and entertainment purposes only. If you choose to use AAS it's your responsibility to know the laws of the country that you live in. Consult your physician or health care professional before performing any of the exercises, or following any diet, nutrition or supplement advice described on this website.

  5. #5
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    307
    Rep Points
    2119044

    Quote Originally Posted by musclepump View Post
    Can anyone give me the scientific rundown on why dextrose (glucose) is preferred over plain table sugar when added to PWO shakes? It has to do with dextrose being a monosaccharide and cane sugar being a disaccharide, correct? Whereas cane sugar has to be broken down to glucose (thus dextrose) before use?
    Studies have shown no difference between different types of carbohydrates eaten post exercise and the rate of glycogen replenishment as long as sufficient quantities of carbohydrate are consumed (Burke 1997).

    http://www.mesomorphosis.com/article...-nutrition.htm

  6. #6
    On a River Named Emotion
    Luke95's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    261
    Rep Points
    111443

    Quote Originally Posted by juggernaut View Post
    Just use oats.



  7. #7
    Creator of Chaos
    MODERATOR
    juggernaut's Avatar


    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    11,423
    Rep Points
    319172539

    Jodi recommended it, I used it, it works a helluva lot better than any simple sugar has ever worked (for me that is).
    Disclaimer: All health, fitness, diet, nutrition, anabolic steroid & supplement information posted here is intended for educational and informational purposes only, and is not intended as a substitute for proper medical advice from a medical doctor. We do not condone the use of anabolic steroids (AAS), all information about AAS is for educational and entertainment purposes only. If you choose to use AAS it's your responsibility to know the laws of the country that you live in. Consult your physician or health care professional before performing any of the exercises, or following any diet, nutrition or supplement advice described on this website.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    musclepump's Avatar


    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    America! Fuck yeah!
    Posts
    6,671
    Rep Points
    9223879

    Plain table sugar is sucrose, isn't it?
    Let's all join together and SPEAK ENGLISH IN AMERICA.


  9. #9
    Senior Member
    ELITE MEMBER


    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    Earth
    Posts
    18,563
    Rep Points
    66150743

    Right sucrose is a disacchride(sp?) a bond of Glucose and Fructose.

  10. #10
    Metrosexual
    ELITE MEMBER
    DOMS's Avatar


    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    In a van, down by the river...
    Posts
    32,686
    Rep Points
    1862244849

    I thought is was because dextrose didn't need to be converted in the liver and cane sugar did.

    Ah, I find this over at Yahoo! answers and jives with what I've read before. Pretty much, is says that monosaccharides (like glucose) are the most simple for of carbohydrates and don't need to be converted in the liver, unlike disaccharides which do.


    Carbohydrates: Simple vs. Complex

    What Are Carbohydrates?
    Carbohydrates are combinations of carbon (C), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O). The basic formula: CnH2nOn. All carbohydrates are made up of one or more molecules of simple sugars. They are classified by structure:

    Monosaccharides or one-molecule sugars. Those commonly found in food are:

    glucose (dextrose or blood sugar)
    fructose (levulose or fruit sugar)
    galactose (occurs mainly in milk)
    Disaccharides are two monosaccharides linked together. Those common to food always contain at least one glucose molecule.

    sucrose (table sugar) = glucose + fructose
    lactose (milk sugar) = glucose + galactose
    maltose (malt sugar) = glucose + glucose

    Polysaccharides (complex carbohydrates) are made up of simple sugars (monosaccharides) or their derivatives linked together in different ways. Those found in food include:

    starch - made up of several hundred glucose units joined together.
    dietary fiber - consists of glucose, galactose or other monosaccharides linked together in such manners that the long chains are indigestible.

    Energy From Carbohydrates
    To utilize carbohydrates for energy, your body converts them to glucose. Carbohydrates--from sugars, fruits, vegetables or grains--follow a similar route in the process of digestion. Monosaccharides are absorbed and carried unchanged to the liver before distribution throughout the body. Disaccharides and the more complex starches are broken into their simple sugar constituent parts, then routed to the liver.

    Sucrose, for example is broken down in the intestine to its components, glucose and fructose. These two sugars are absorbed into the bloodstream and carried directly to the liver. Some fructose is converted into glucose in the liver before it is returned to the blood for use as energy.

    If the glucose is not needed right away to meet energy needs, it is converted preferentially to glycogen, the starch-like compound that is the energy reserve of human metabolism. Glycogen can be converted back to glucose when the body needs energy. Once the body's glycogen reserves are filled, any remaining glucose and fructose become involved in the metabolism of dietary fats and their physiological products.

    All carbohydrate foods, such as potatoes, broccoli, apples, grapes, sugar, honey, have the same ultimate destination: they become glucose, fuel for the body.

    Carbohydrates: Simple vs. Complex
    In recent years, nutrition scientists have reexamined traditional views about the physiological differences between "simple" and "complex" carbohydrates. The old view was that any simple carbohydrate raised blood sugar levels very quickly because it was metabolized rapidly, while any complex carbohydrate caused a slower and more moderate rise in blood sugar.

    However, research on the "glycemic index of foods" shows no defined nutritional difference between simple and complex carbohydrates. Some simple sugars cause a slow, moderate rise in blood sugar levels; some complex carbohydrates cause a rapid rise. Table sugar has a moderate effect on blood sugar--about the same as potatoes and less than bread or rice. This new knowledge has led to a better understanding of carbohydrate's role in nutrition and to increased flexibility in meal planning for people with diabetes. Carbohydrates provide the most easily accessible energy source for your body. The other main sources of energy are protein and fats. However, carbohydrates are efficiently converted into glucose which will be used for energy. Glucose is used directly by your muscles and brain. Excess glucose is stored as glycogen in your muscles. Where a supply of glucose is not available, your muscles will burn fat as a source of energy.


    By being converted into glucose, levels of carbohydrates will affect your blood sugar levels. Your blood sugar levels are important because your brain uses glucose from your blood. This explains why people often get depressed and down beat whilst on diets. Your blood sugar levels are not something that should be neglected!

    Carbohydrates come in two forms: Simple carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates contain naturally occurring sugars, such as those found in fruit (fructose) for example. The sugars that make up simple carbohydrates also include table sugar (sucrose) and a variety of syrups.

    Because simple carbohydrates are already simple sugars they can rapidly be converted into glucose and enter the bloodstream very soon after consumption. This where the term "sugar fix" comes from. After drinking a sugary cup of tea, for example, you may notice a sudden release of energy and an accompanying lift in your mood. However, have too much and your body will produce insulin to counteract the effect and, depending on how much sugar you've ingested, this will likely result in a rapid drop in blood sugar level and leave you feeling more tired than before!

    So what are complex carbohydrates then? Complex carbohydrates are present in most grain products, vegetables and potatoes. Unlike simple carbohydrates, complex carbs are digested at a much slower rate. As a result of this, the conversion to glucose also happens at a slower rate and your blood sugar levels will not fluctuate as rapidly as they do when digesting simple carbohydrates.

    Many people will try and avoid all types of carbohydrates where possible, particularly when on weight loss diets. This is not a good idea. Carbohydrates in general are not normally a problem. It's the quality of carbohydrates that should be taken into account. Highly processed foods should be avoided. This is because they normally contain a higher proportion of simple carbohydrates. For example, whole grain bread (complex carbs) should be eaten instead of white bread which uses refined white flour (simple carbs).

    Complex carbohydrates are often also lower in fat and provide higher amounts of other essential nutrients like dietary fiber. It is for the above reasons that a diet of complex carbohydrates is preferable.


  11. #11
    Bodybuilder & Moneymaker


    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    197
    Rep Points
    166849

    Dextrose is a horrid carbohydrate. You almost go into a coma an hour after you drink it cause of the backlash from the initial surge going the other way. I wont ever touch even maltodextrin either. They are all bad for you especially if your predisposed to diabetic gene like me.

  12. #12
    Registered User


    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    159
    Rep Points
    10

    Quote Originally Posted by DOMS View Post
    I thought is was because dextrose didn't need to be converted in the liver and cane sugar did.

    Ah, I find this over at Yahoo! answers and jives with what I've read before. Pretty much, is says that monosaccharides (like glucose) are the most simple for of carbohydrates and don't need to be converted in the liver, unlike disaccharides which do.


    Carbohydrates: Simple vs. Complex

    What Are Carbohydrates?
    Carbohydrates are combinations of carbon (C), hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O). The basic formula: CnH2nOn. All carbohydrates are made up of one or more molecules of simple sugars. They are classified by structure:

    Monosaccharides or one-molecule sugars. Those commonly found in food are:

    glucose (dextrose or blood sugar)
    fructose (levulose or fruit sugar)
    galactose (occurs mainly in milk)
    Disaccharides are two monosaccharides linked together. Those common to food always contain at least one glucose molecule.

    sucrose (table sugar) = glucose + fructose
    lactose (milk sugar) = glucose + galactose
    maltose (malt sugar) = glucose + glucose

    Polysaccharides (complex carbohydrates) are made up of simple sugars (monosaccharides) or their derivatives linked together in different ways. Those found in food include:

    starch - made up of several hundred glucose units joined together.
    dietary fiber - consists of glucose, galactose or other monosaccharides linked together in such manners that the long chains are indigestible.

    Energy From Carbohydrates
    To utilize carbohydrates for energy, your body converts them to glucose. Carbohydrates--from sugars, fruits, vegetables or grains--follow a similar route in the process of digestion. Monosaccharides are absorbed and carried unchanged to the liver before distribution throughout the body. Disaccharides and the more complex starches are broken into their simple sugar constituent parts, then routed to the liver.

    Sucrose, for example is broken down in the intestine to its components, glucose and fructose. These two sugars are absorbed into the bloodstream and carried directly to the liver. Some fructose is converted into glucose in the liver before it is returned to the blood for use as energy.

    If the glucose is not needed right away to meet energy needs, it is converted preferentially to glycogen, the starch-like compound that is the energy reserve of human metabolism. Glycogen can be converted back to glucose when the body needs energy. Once the body's glycogen reserves are filled, any remaining glucose and fructose become involved in the metabolism of dietary fats and their physiological products.

    All carbohydrate foods, such as potatoes, broccoli, apples, grapes, sugar, honey, have the same ultimate destination: they become glucose, fuel for the body.

    Carbohydrates: Simple vs. Complex
    In recent years, nutrition scientists have reexamined traditional views about the physiological differences between "simple" and "complex" carbohydrates. The old view was that any simple carbohydrate raised blood sugar levels very quickly because it was metabolized rapidly, while any complex carbohydrate caused a slower and more moderate rise in blood sugar.

    However, research on the "glycemic index of foods" shows no defined nutritional difference between simple and complex carbohydrates. Some simple sugars cause a slow, moderate rise in blood sugar levels; some complex carbohydrates cause a rapid rise. Table sugar has a moderate effect on blood sugar--about the same as potatoes and less than bread or rice. This new knowledge has led to a better understanding of carbohydrate's role in nutrition and to increased flexibility in meal planning for people with diabetes. Carbohydrates provide the most easily accessible energy source for your body. The other main sources of energy are protein and fats. However, carbohydrates are efficiently converted into glucose which will be used for energy. Glucose is used directly by your muscles and brain. Excess glucose is stored as glycogen in your muscles. Where a supply of glucose is not available, your muscles will burn fat as a source of energy.


    By being converted into glucose, levels of carbohydrates will affect your blood sugar levels. Your blood sugar levels are important because your brain uses glucose from your blood. This explains why people often get depressed and down beat whilst on diets. Your blood sugar levels are not something that should be neglected!

    Carbohydrates come in two forms: Simple carbohydrates and complex carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates contain naturally occurring sugars, such as those found in fruit (fructose) for example. The sugars that make up simple carbohydrates also include table sugar (sucrose) and a variety of syrups.

    Because simple carbohydrates are already simple sugars they can rapidly be converted into glucose and enter the bloodstream very soon after consumption. This where the term "sugar fix" comes from. After drinking a sugary cup of tea, for example, you may notice a sudden release of energy and an accompanying lift in your mood. However, have too much and your body will produce insulin to counteract the effect and, depending on how much sugar you've ingested, this will likely result in a rapid drop in blood sugar level and leave you feeling more tired than before!

    So what are complex carbohydrates then? Complex carbohydrates are present in most grain products, vegetables and potatoes. Unlike simple carbohydrates, complex carbs are digested at a much slower rate. As a result of this, the conversion to glucose also happens at a slower rate and your blood sugar levels will not fluctuate as rapidly as they do when digesting simple carbohydrates.

    Many people will try and avoid all types of carbohydrates where possible, particularly when on weight loss diets. This is not a good idea. Carbohydrates in general are not normally a problem. It's the quality of carbohydrates that should be taken into account. Highly processed foods should be avoided. This is because they normally contain a higher proportion of simple carbohydrates. For example, whole grain bread (complex carbs) should be eaten instead of white bread which uses refined white flour (simple carbs).

    Complex carbohydrates are often also lower in fat and provide higher amounts of other essential nutrients like dietary fiber. It is for the above reasons that a diet of complex carbohydrates is preferable.

    in simpler terms,

    fructose is more likely to be converted to fat.

    here is the geeky shit,

    dextrose is pure glucose molecules. On the other hand, table sugar(sucrose) is made up of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of fructose. Dextrose is preferable over sucrose because of the way fructose and glucose are metabolised.

    the major enzyme that metabolises glucose is glucose-6-phosphotases, this enzyme is abundant. On the other hand, the enzyme that metabolise fructose is fructose-1-phosphotase,which is found at a lower level. whwn you ingest a lot of fructose in the form of table sugar, you are overwhelming your fructose-1-phosphatase system. The fructose in excess is going to be converted to fat, whereas higher level of glucose cab be converted to glycogen.

    finally, I think the benefits are marginal. using dextrose is a bit of an overkill for me.
    Last edited by zl214; 01-16-2007 at 05:23 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. How often do you fly in a plain?
    By Jo-Anna in forum Open Chat
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 02-22-2008, 03:21 PM
  2. Plain...
    By -mr. tuff in forum Healthy Recipes
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-19-2006, 12:47 PM
  3. Corn Sugar - Dextrose
    By Alaric in forum Diet & Nutrition
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-04-2004, 10:42 AM
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-06-2004, 03:50 PM
  5. is dextrose a form of sugar?
    By omegaman in forum Diet & Nutrition
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-12-2001, 05:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
-->