Rich Protein foods

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  1. #1
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    Question Rich Protein foods

    What are some foods stacked full of natural protein? thanx

  2. #2
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    Tuna is always a winner - 26% protein

    All meats, especially Beef and red meat in general are high on Protein.

    But why not just read the label?

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    Re: Rich Protein foods

    Originally posted by Rlo
    What are some foods stacked full of natural protein? thanx
    Obviously all animal meats are protein.

    Dairy such as cottage cheese, cheese, milk, etc has protein, but also comes w/ carbs...mostly sugar.

    You can also find protein of varying qualities in foods such as beans, tofu, nuts, etc.

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    Complete Proteins: Lean cuts of beef, chicken, Ostrich, Duck, venison, tuna (80% of energy as protein), salmon, orange roughy, trout, other fish, eggs, milk, lean cuts of pork etc.

    Incomplete proteins: Peanuts, Walnuts, Almonds, other nuts, Whole wheat pasta, kidney beans, many types of grains and cereals etc.

    It is also important to note that mixing an incomplete protein with another incomplete protein will inturn create a complete protein if the right proteins are mixed together. The key is knowing the missing amino acid in one food and picking it up in another.

    Definitions:

    Complete Protein: Are proteins that contain all 8-9(*) essential amino acids.

    Incomplete Protein: Are proteins that are missing one or more of the 8-9(*) essential amino acids.

    Good mixes for incomplete proteins to make complete proteins are: red beans/rice, Soybeans/sesame seeds, Green Beans/Almonds, Corn Tortillas/Pinto Beans etc.

    *=Infants require 9 essential amino acids while adults only need 8. Histidine is the amino acid that is essential to infants and is not for adults do not.


    Athlete Protein intake ranges from 1.2-1.6 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight.

    This is just a brief overview of protein if you have anymore questions just ask. GOOD LUCK!!!

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    I should also add that 1 gram of protein=4 Kcal.

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    I believe they've all pretty much been mentioned.

    TJohn

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    Originally posted by john992
    Athlete Protein intake ranges from 1.2-1.6 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight.
    Are you sure? I've heard of people intaking much more than me, I'm using the 1.0 gram per pound "rule". I've heard anything from .8 grams per pound, to 3 grams per kilogram bodyweight.

    1.6 per kilogram would put me at about only 156 grams per day, weighing 215 pounds.

    I remember Flex Wheeler claiming 500 grams per day which was an insane amount even compared to guys alot larger than him, although he did have a fast metabolism, not sure that had anything to do with his decision.

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    I am by far an expert but that sounds awfully low to me as well. I weigh 114 and I eat 180 - 200 grams protein a day.

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    Actually it is too low for BB standards. John likes to go by the book and only believes in what has been scientifically proven.

    I think you'll find him in the minority in that belief in regards to BB.

    Most in this sport eat at least 1-2 g lb of LBM. It has been shown that athletes under physical stress require more than the RDA for protein. Also, your needs for protein increase under calorie restriction.

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    Oh, ok, so were talking based on a 1970's study of a college student and thier caloric needs, that clears it up

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    W8, your right in saying that athletes under stress ( being an athlete basically states that you are being put under some kind of physical stress) require more then the RDA, which is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight for sedentary individuals. But if you are referring to the RDA for atheltes, which is 1.2-1.6 grams of protein per kilogram of bodyweight I will have to disagree with your statement. I can post many articles/position statements/scientific studies proving this if someone could tell me how to post them on here.


    If a individual is experiencing DISEASE, ILLNESS or SEVERE MENTAL/PHYSICAL STRESS this may cause an individual to increase these numbers but only slightly. ANd when your health returns to normal it is important that you also return your protein intake to normal. EXcessive protein can cause your body to produce toxic byproducts like ammonia and uric acid. A very probable effect of excessive protein intake is the onset of bone demineralization (osteoporosis), Dehydration, kidney dysfunction etc.
    Last edited by john992; 06-13-2002 at 04:27 PM.

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    Lets not forget, that scientific study also proved that the 4 minute mile was not possible.

    It seems the enthusiast often finds what is truth, before the feds.

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    Lets also not forget that thousands of people die every day because they are going against science and experimenting with what science has proved dangerous.

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    True as well.

    Studies show weight lifters might need .72g/lb. of bodyweight, highly trained cyclists might need .8g/lb., rigorous exercise training might require 1.3g/lb., and world-class weight lifters may use upwards of 1.6g/lb.

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    The methodology that "more is better" is the basic theorizing of many protein supplement users, especially in the bodybuilding scene. Athletes(bodybuilders) often base their meal planning on nutritional advice from their friends, nonscientific mentors, heroes, or idols-rather than scientific evidence.

    There has not been any evidence showing a constant, linear increase in muscle mass or performance when consuming high-protein diets as opposed to using the RDA athlete protein requirements (1.2-1.6 grams per kg of bodyweight) .
    Last edited by john992; 06-13-2002 at 06:01 PM.

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