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Iraq insists on withdrawal timetable

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  1. #1
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    Iraq insists on withdrawal timetable






    Iraqi Prime Minister Calls for Date of Withdrawal for US Troops

    BAGHDAD (AP) - Iraq's national security adviser said Tuesday his country will not accept any security deal with the United States unless it contains specific dates for the withdrawal of U.S.-led forces.

    The comments by Mouwaffak al-Rubaie were the strongest yet by an Iraqi official about the deal now under negotiation with U.S. officials. They came a day after Iraq's prime minister first said publicly that he expects the pending troop deal with the United States to have some type of timetable for withdrawal.

    President Bush has said he opposes a timetable. The White House said Monday it did not believe Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki was proposing a rigid timeline for U.S. troop withdrawals.

    U.S. officials had no immediate comment Tuesday on al-Rubaie's statement.

    Al-Rubaie spoke to reporters after briefing Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani in Najaf on the progress of the government's security efforts and the talks.

    "Our stance in the negotiations underway with the American side will be strong ... We will not accept any memorandum of understanding that doesn't have specific dates to withdraw foreign forces from Iraq," al-Rubaie said.

    He provided no details. But Ali al-Adeeb, a Shiite lawmaker and a prominent official in the prime minister's party, told The Associated Press that Iraq was linking the timetable proposal to the ongoing handover of various provinces to Iraqi control.

    The Iraqi proposal stipulates that, once Iraqi forces have resumed security responsibility in all 18 of Iraq's provinces, U.S.-led forces would then withdraw from all cities in the country.

    After that, the country's security situation would be reviewed every six months, for three to five years, to decide when U.S.-led troops would pull out entirely, al-Adeeb said.

    So far, the United States has handed control of nine of 18 provinces to Iraqi officials.

    "This is what the Iraqi people want, the parliament and other Iraqi leaders," said al-Adeeb.

    The proposal, as outlined by al-Adeeb, is phrased in a way that would allow Iraqi officials to tell the Iraqi public that it includes a specific timetable and dates for a U.S. withdrawal.

    However, it also would provide the United States some flexibility on timing because the dates of the provincial handovers are not set.

    Some type of troop status agreement between the United States and Iraq is needed to keep U.S. troops in Iraq after a U.N. mandate expires at year's end.

    Iraq's government has felt increasingly confident in recent weeks about its authority and the country's improved stability. Iraqi officials have sharpened their public stance in the negotiations considerably in just the last few days.

    Violence in Iraq has fallen to its lowest level in four years. The change has been driven by the 2007 buildup of American forces, the Sunni tribal revolt against al-Qaida in Iraq and crackdowns against Shiite militias and Sunni extremists.

    In northern Baghdad Tuesday, guards opened fire, wounding 13 people when a crowd seeking aid payments for the poor, widows, orphans and disabled people became unruly, Iraqi officials said.

    The U.S. military said a soldier had died from injuries sustained when a roadside bomb hit a troop convoy in Baghdad.

    The U.S. military says five other soldiers were wounded in Tuesday's attack in the western Baghdad neighborhood of Amiriyah.

    Iraq insists on withdrawal timetable

  2. #2
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    Iraq says may agree timetable for U.S. withdrawal

    By Dean Yates and Ahmed Rasheed
    BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki raised the prospect on Monday of setting a timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. troops as part of negotiations over a new security agreement with Washington.
    It was the first time the U.S.-backed Shi'ite-led government has floated the idea of a timetable for the removal of American forces from Iraq. The Bush administration has always opposed such a move, saying it would give militant groups an advantage.
    The security deal under negotiation will replace a U.N. mandate for the presence of U.S. troops that expires on December 31.
    "Today, we are looking at the necessity of terminating the foreign presence on Iraqi lands and restoring full sovereignty," Maliki told Arab ambassadors in blunt remarks during an official visit to Abu Dhabi, capital of the United Arab Emirates.
    "One of the two basic topics is either to have a memorandum of understanding for the departure of forces or a memorandum of understanding to set a timetable for the presence of the forces, so that we know (their presence) will end in a specific time."
    Maliki was responding to questions from the ambassadors about the security negotiations with the United States. The exchange was shown on Iraqiya state television.
    U.S. officials in Baghdad had no immediate comment. Last month Maliki caught Washington off guard when he said talks on the security deal were at a "dead end" after he complained Iraq's sovereignty was being infringed by U.S. demands.
    Both sides later said progress was being made.
    Maliki said the Iraqi and U.S. positions had gotten closer, but added "we cannot talk about reaching an agreement yet".
    He said foreign forces would need Iraqi permission for many of their activities once the U.N. mandate ended.
    "This means the phenomena of unilateral detention will be over, as well as unilateral operations and immunity," he said.
    Maliki did not clarify who the immunity referred to.
    Officials have said contractors working for the U.S. government would lose immunity from Iraqi law, but Washington is highly unlikely to let the same thing happen to U.S. solders.
    MALIKI WOOS ARAB STATES
    Maliki, dismissed as weak and ineffective for most of his tenure since taking over as prime minister in May 2006, has been increasingly assertive in recent months.
    He has launched crackdowns on Shi'ite militias and also al Qaeda, with U.S. forces playing a mainly supporting role.
    He has also called on Arab states to re-engage with Iraq.
    Sunni Arab countries have long been reluctant to extend full legitimacy to the Iraqi government because of the U.S. presence, as well as Baghdad's close ties to non-Arab, Shi'ite Iran.
    But Arab ties have begun to improve.
    The United Arab Emirates has cancelled almost $7 billion of debt owed by Baghdad, officials said on Sunday. And Jordan's King Abdullah is expected to visit Baghdad this week, the first Arab leader to do so since the U.S.-led invasion in 2003.
    Maliki did not specifically refer to the 150,000 American troops in Iraq, but they comprise the vast bulk of foreign forces in the country.
    He indicated the memorandum of understanding would be used instead of the formal Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA) being negotiated. The MoU could be a stop-gap measure given some of the difficulties getting a full SOFA deal in place.
    Iraqi officials had said they would submit any SOFA to parliament, where it might be subject to long and bitter debate.
    Maliki has long come under pressure from the movement of powerful Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr to set a timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. forces. Sadr's movement quit Maliki's government last year when the prime minister refused to do so.
    Luwaa Sumaisem, head of the Sadr bloc's political committee, welcomed Maliki's comments on possibly setting a timetable.
    "This is a step in the right direction and we are ready to support him in this objective. We hope Maliki will show seriousness about it," Sumaisem said, without saying if the movement might then consider rejoining the government.
    Washington and Baghdad are also negotiating a separate long-term agreement on political, economic and security ties.
    After five years in Iraq, the Bush administration had set an end-July target for wrapping up the negotiations. Some Iraqi officials had questioned whether the deadline could be met.
    (Additional reporting by Ahmed Rasheed and Tim Cocks in Baghdad and Lin Noueihed in Abu Dhabi, Editing by Stephen Weeks

    Iraq says may agree timetable for U.S. withdrawal | Reuters

  3. #3
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    Good. We need to get out of that money pit, shit hole.


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    Quote Originally Posted by DOMS View Post
    Good. We need to get out of that money pit, shit hole.
    wait, I thought you wanted us there?





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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prince View Post
    wait, I thought you wanted us there?
    Hell no. I just wanted us to destroy the Iraqi army, get Saddam, and get out.

    Staying there to bring democracy to those incapable of living it, is a waste of American lives and money.


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    Quote Originally Posted by DOMS View Post
    Hell no. I just wanted us to destroy the Iraqi army, get Saddam, and get out.

    I think everyone wanted this in the beginning.

    Staying there to bring democracy to those incapable of living it, is a waste of American lives and money.

    And most are starting to feel like this now.

    We could stay there 'til the end of time, and I doubt our presence would ever insure Democracy. While I feel badly for the innocent people who have been caught in the middle of the madness, until they have had enough and defend themselves against the bad element that is destroying their homeland, they'll never be free of anything.

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